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ACT 001 Accounting Associate Competency Review

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Accounting and Finance
Course Syllabus
ACT 001:  Accounting Associate Competency Review
Credit Hours: non-credit

Course Description: This non-credit, no cost course is a review component of all accounting materials presented for the Associate of Science Degree in Accounting. This course is a review of all materials that culminates in a comprehensive examination.  The course is pass/fail. 

Course Prerequisite: Last Quarter of AS Degree

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Describe product/service costing techniques
2. Describe basic asset management practices and planning documents
3. Describe working capital management practices and policies
4. Prepare consolidated financial statements
5. Describe strategic cost management issues including its design and use
6. Describe the components of performance of an accounting information system
7. Identify FASB pronouncements
8. Describe long term financing and capital structure
9. Compute individual taxes and related personal finance calculations

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on the Course Outline       

Grading System:

 This is a pass/fail course

 Letter Grade

 % Range

 Definition

 A

 90-100

 Excellent

 B

 80-89

 Above Average

 C

 70-79

 Average

 D

 60-69

 Below Average

 F

 0-59

 Failing

 W

 -----

 Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

 WF

 -----

 Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

 NF

 -----

 Failing - not actively engaged

 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook. 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.  

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:  {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.}

 

Effective date: Spring 2018

 

ACT 002 Accounting Bachelor Competency Review

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Accounting and Finance
Course Syllabus
ACT 002:  Accounting Bachelor Competency Review
Credit Hours: non-credit

Course Description: This non-credit, no cost course is a review component of all accounting materials presented for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting. This course is a review of all materials that culminates in a comprehensive examination.  The course is pass/fail. 

Course Prerequisite: Last Quarter of BS Degree

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.  Develop a budget and explain its impact on the business organization
2.  Explain and solve product/service costing techniques
3.  Interpret basic asset management practices and planning documents
4.  Explain consolidated financial statements
5.  Summarize strategic cost management issues including its design and use
6.  Appraise the components of performance of an accounting information system
7.  Appraise the major components of performance evaluation systems
8.  Translate FASB pronouncements
9.  Summarize the internal audit function
10. Compute and explain corporate income taxes
11. Explain the procedures used within the external audit function

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on the Course Outline       

Grading System:

 This is a pass/fail course

 Letter Grade

 % Range

 Definition

 A

 90-100

 Excellent

 B

 80-89

 Above Average

 C

 70-79

 Average

 D

 60-69

 Below Average

 F

 0-59

 Failing

 W

 -----

 Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

 WF

 -----

 Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

 NF

 -----

 Failing - not actively engaged

 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook. 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.  

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:  {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.}

 

Effective date: Spring 2018

 

ACT 101 Principles of Accounting I

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Accounting and Finance
Course Syllabus
ACT 101:  Principles of Accounting I
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This is the first course in accounting, stressing accounting procedures.  The class covers rules of debit and credit for service companies, adjusting and closing procedures, cash and accounts receivable. 

Course Prerequisite:  none

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Describe the components of an accounting information system

2.       Identify FASB pronouncements

Assessment of Outcomes:

 

 Measurement Tool

 Points

 Tests

 500

 Homework Review Assignments

 200

 Final Exam

 200

 Computerized Problems

 100

 

Grading System:

 

 Letter Grade

 % Range

 Definition

 A

 90-100

 Excellent

 B

 80-89

 Above Average

 C

 70-79

 Average

 D

 60-69

 Below Average

 F

 50-59

 Failing

 W

 -----

 Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

 WF

 -----

 Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

 NF

 -----

 Failing - not actively engaged

 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook. 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.  

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:  {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.}

 

Effective date: Fall 2017

ACT 102 Principles of Accounting II

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Accounting and Finance
Course Syllabus
ACT 102:  Principles of Accounting II
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This is the second course in accounting.  The class covers an introduction to merchandising procedures, current assets, current liabilities, inventory, and long-term assets.  It is intended to broaden the student's general understanding of financial accounting and to provide a strong foundation for future courses and financial decision making.  (Pre-requisite: ACT101) 

Course Prerequisite:  ACT 102

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Describe basic asset management and planning document

2.       Describe working capital management practices and policies

3.       Identify FASB pronouncements

Note:  Within these SLOs the student will be able to do the following after completing this course:

The student will be able to:

1.       Journalize transactions for a merchandising business.

2.       Exhibit an understanding of inventory costing methods, and how the choice of methods impact financial statements.

3.       Exhibit an understanding of depreciation methods, and how the choice of methods impact financial statements.

4.       Exhibit an understand of the acquisition and disposal of long term assets

5.       Analyze uncollectible accounts.  Select appropriate methods for estimating bad debts and the effect of on the financial statements.

6.       Exhibit an understanding of promissory notes.             

7.       Complete an entire cycle for a merchandising business with a beginning look at FASB pronouncements.

Assessment of Outcomes:
 

Measurement Tool

Points

 Tests

 500

 Homework Review Assignments

 200

 Final Exam

 200

 Computerized Problems 

 100

 

 

Grading System:

 Letter Grade

 % Range

 Definition

 A

90-100

 Excellent

 B

80-89

 Above Average

 C

70-79

 Average

 D

60-69

 Below Average

 F

0-59

 Failing

 W


 Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

 WF


 Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

 NF


 Failing - not actively engaged

 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook. 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.  

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:  {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.}


Effective date: Fall 2017

ACT 103 Principles of Accounting II

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Accounting and Finance

Course Syllabus

ACT 103:� Principles of Accounting III

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: This is the third introductory course in accounting, covering accounting for liabilities, equity, partnerships and corporations.  An in-depth study of financial statements and their analysis culminates the course.  (Pre-requisite: ACT102)

 

 

Course Prerequisite:� ACT 102

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Student Learning Outcomes:� Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and utilize various GAAP principles and procedures

 

��������� Note:� Within the SLOs above, the student will be able to do the following after completing this course:

1.       Understand and prepare entries for a partnership;

2.       Understand and journalize transactions for a corporation;

3.       Understand and journalize transactions for bonds;

4.       Prepare a statement of cash flows;

5.       Understand financial analysis and its uses.

 

 

Assessment of Outcomes:

 

Measurement Tools

Points

 

 

Tests   

500

 

 

Homework and Discussion Assignments 

200

 

 

Final exam

200

 

 

Essay/Research paper    

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

% Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation:� Students must be actively engaged in the course.� For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:� Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.� They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.� For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.��

 

Students with Disabilities:� Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.�

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:� {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.}

 

 

Effective date: Fall 2017

 

 

ACT 111 Computerized Accounting

ULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Accounting and Finance
Course Syllabus
ACT 111:  Computerized Accounting
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description:  The course is an introduction to the computerized accounting environment including automated journalizing, report preparation, end of cycle procedures, specialized journal, and analysis.  

Course Prerequisite:  ACT 102 and CSC 118

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�         Describe and Interpret the components of an accounting information system

Note:  Within the SLOs above, the student will be able to do the following after completing this course:

o    The understanding of principles of accounting will broaden as it is applied to QuickBooks Pro software. Specifically you will: 

o    Apply and practice accounting transactions for companies

o    Create financial reports useful in decision making

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on the Course Outline

Grading System:
 

Letter Grade

% Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W


Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF


Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF


Failing - not actively engaged

 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook. Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.  

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:  {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.}



Effective date: Fall 2017

 

ACT 121 Payroll Accounting

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Accounting and Finance

Course Syllabus

ACT 121:  Payroll Accounting

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: This course is an in-depth coverage of financial accounting theory and practice relating to financial statement presentation, cash flow analysis and financial ratio analysis.

Course Prerequisite: ACT 103

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Describe and interpret the components of payroll within an accounting information system

2.       Identify payroll items within individual income taxes and related personal finance calculations

Note:  Within the SLOs above, the student will be able to do the following after finishing this course:

�         Analyze various accounting theory concepts within financial accounting.

�         Explain and apply income statement concepts of financial accounting

�         Explain and apply balance sheet concepts of financial accounting

�         Explain and apply statement of cash flow concepts of financial accounting

�         Critically read and write on accounting literature topics at an intermediate level

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on the Course Outline       

Grading System:

 Letter Grade

 % Range

 Definition

 A

 90-100

 Excellent

 B

 80-89

 Above Average

 C

 70-79

 Average

 D

 60-69

 Below Average

 F

 0-59

 Failing

 W

 -----

 Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

 WF

 -----

 Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

 NF

 -----

 Failing - not actively engaged

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook. 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.  

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:  {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.}

 

Effective date: Spring 2018

ACT 201 Intermediate Accounting I

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Accounting and Finance

Course Syllabus

ACT 201:  Intermediate Accounting I

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: This course is an in-depth coverage of financial accounting theory and practice relating to financial statement presentation, cash flow analysis and financial ratio analysis. 

Course Prerequisite: ACT 103

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Describe various elements within consolidated financial statements.

2.       Identify various elements of GAAP and iGAAP with the use of financial statements.

Note:  Within the SLOs above, the student will be able to do the following after finishing this course:

�         Analyze various accounting theory concepts within financial accounting.

�         Explain and apply income statement concepts of financial accounting.

�         Explain and apply balance sheet concepts of financial accounting.

�         Explain and apply statement of cash flow concepts of financial accounting.

�         Critically read and write on accounting literature topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on the Course Outline       

Grading System:

 

 Letter Grade

 % Range

 Definition

 A

 90-100

 Excellent

 B

 80-89

 Above Average

 C

 70-79

 Average

 D

 60-69

 Below Average

 F

 0-59

 Failing

 W

 -----

 Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

 WF

 -----

 Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

 NF

 -----

 Failing - not actively engaged

 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook. 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.  

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:  {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.}

 

Effective date: Fall 2017

ACT 202 Intermediate Accounting II

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Accounting and Finance
Course Syllabus
ACT 202:  Intermediate Accounting II
Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: This course is an in-depth coverage of financial accounting theory and practice relating to various asset categories including current, Investments, PPE, natural resources and Intangible Assets.)

Course Prerequisite: ACT 201                                    

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Identify various elements of information systems with the use of financial statements

2.       Summarize various elements of GAAP and iGAAP with the use of financial statements

3.       Describe long-term financing and capital structures 

Note:  Within the SLOs above, the student will be able to do the following after finishing this course:

�         Explain and apply the revenue/receivables/cash cycle concepts of financial accounting

�         Explain and apply cost of goods sold and inventory concepts of financial accounting

�         Explain and apply investment concepts of financial accounting

�         Explain and apply plant asset concepts of financial accounting

�         Critically read and write on accounting literature topics at an intermediate level

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on the Course Outline

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

% Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook. 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog. 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:  {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.}

Effective date: Fall 2017

ACT 203 Intermediate Accounting III

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Accounting and Finance
Course Syllabus
ACT 203:  Intermediate Accounting III
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This course covers financial accounting theory and practice relating to liabilities, owner�s equity, and special topic areas within financial accounting. 

Course Prerequisite: ACT 201

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Identify various elements of information systems with the use of financial statements

2.       Summarize various elements of GAAP and iGAAP with the use of financial statements

3.       Describe long-term financing and capital structures 

Note:  Within the SLOs above, the student will be able to do the following after finishing this course:

�         Explain and apply current and long-term liability concepts of financial accounting

�         Explain and apply equity concepts of financial accounting

�         Critically read and write on accounting literature topics at an intermediate level

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on Course Outline

Grading System:

Letter Grade

% Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W


Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF


Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF


Failing - not actively engaged

 


For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.  

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:  {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.}

 

Effective date: Fall 2017

ACT 211 Cost Accounting

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Accounting and Finance
Course Syllabus
ACT 211:  Cost Accounting
Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description:  This course introduces cost terminology and the basic principles and techniques of job order costing, process costing, standard cost accounting and related topics.

 

Course Prerequisite:  ACT 102

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  With the completion of this course, the student will be able to:

 

1.       Develop and/or explain a budget and its impact on business organizations

2.       Describe and explain various product costs

3.       Describe various cost management concepts and issues

 

Note:  Within these SLOs the student will be able to do the following after completing this course:

 

The student will be able to:

 

1.       Understand the basic components of a cost accounting system.

2.       Account for materials, labor and overhead in a job-order system

3.       Understand the basic components of a process accounting system

4.       Understand and prepare budgets

5.       Understand basic planning and control tools using standard costing

6.       Exhibit an understanding of cost behavior and types of costs

7.       Utilize various cost-volume-profit techniques for management decision

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified within the Course Outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.  Note: please ask your instructor for their late policy on assignments.

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Sullivan University cares that students attend their courses. Just as showing up for work is critically important to job security and work effectiveness, showing up for class is critically important for mastering the career skills and concepts necessary to obtain, maintain, and be promoted on a job. Every effort should be made to attend and academically engage in every class and/or laboratory session.

 

Attendance will be recorded for each class meeting and absences that exceed the standards of this policy will result in students being administratively dropped from the course(s) affected.  Please ask your instructor if you have any attendance policy questions.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.  Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the current catalog.  They can include failure for the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

 

ACT264X Federal Tax I (online)

Sullivan University

College of Accounting and Finance

ACT264X

Federal Tax I (online)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

An introduction to federal income tax with primary focus on laws and theories that affect the individual and the individual income tax return.

 

COURSE PREREQUISITE: ACT 102


COURSE OUTCOMES:  

1. Explain the general workings of the Federal Tax Law and role of the IRS code.

2. Apply general understanding and knowledge of IRS provisions and issues.

3. Demonstrate understanding of IRS tax code by basic research and valuation of recent changes in tax laws.

4. Complete Basic Individual Tax Returns using Computerized Tax Software.

5. Analyze completed Individual Tax Returns for completeness and adherence to IRS provisions.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
 

1.       Students are expected to read and prepare the assigned material to be discussed each week.

2.       Homework will be assigned. Homework assignments will be completed in the Cengage CNow program which we will be using in conjunction with this site. Homework assigned for points (class participation) will not be accepted late. All work is due on Sunday by 11:55 p.m. of the week assigned. Once a student has completed an assignment, they will be required to upload a screenshot to the appropriate week's dropbox, showing the assignment has been completed.

3.       All tests will be given online through the Cengage CNow program. Tests will consist of multiple choice questions. Tests will be due on Sunday by 11:55 p.m. of the week assigned. No makeup exams will be allowed. Once a student has completed a test, they will be required to upload a screenshot to the appropriate week's dropbox, showing the test has been completed.

4.       One computer problem will be assigned. If not turned in during the week in which they are due, there is a 10 point penalty per day late up to two days late. Problems are due Sunday by 11:55 p.m. of the week they are assigned.

5.       One writing assignment is required. This will be on a topic covered in class and will be two typed pages in length. This will not be accepted late. It will be due Sunday by 11:55 p.m. of the week it is assigned.

6.       Please do not wait until the last minute to upload work or exams to the appropriate week's drop boxes in case there is a computer problem. Homework counts as your class participation grade.

7.       Discussion boards are placed in your week for your communication with other students as you wish. Please email me at my Sullivan email address with any questions or post to the Ask the Professor forum.

8.       Email is my only way of communicating with you so please check your Sullivan email on a daily basis. I do check emails everyday throughout the week; however, I rarely check email on the weekend so please be sure to address any questions to me before then.

9.       Since each week automatically opens and closes, please sure to read the syllabus to stay informed of upcoming work. Some weeks are very busy and looking ahead will help you stay on task and not get overwhelmed during the busier weeks.

10.    If you have any computer issues, you can contact the Learning Management System support for 24/7 assistance by clicking on the �?� icon in the left navigational frame in the Learning Management System.

 

ASSESSMENT OF OUTCOMES:

 

Exams � 4

40%

Computer problem

20%

Writing assignment

20%

Class participation

20%

Total

100%

 

 Letter Grade

 % Range

 Definition

 A

 90-100

 Excellent

 B

 80-89

 Above Average

 C

 70-79

 Average

 D

 60-69

 Below Average

 F

 0-59

 Failing

 W

 -----

 Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

 WF

 -----

 Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

 NF

 -----

 Failing - not actively engaged

 

 

Programs: For this course, a grade of C or better is required for successful completion.


General Education: Depending on the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

  

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog. 

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

 

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

ACT 334 Federal Tax II

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Accounting and Finance

Course Syllabus

ACT 334:  Federal Tax II

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: This course covers the aspects of federal tax report preparation for partnerships, corporations, estates, trusts and gifts. 

  

Course Prerequisite:  ACT 264 � Federal Tax I 

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

         1.      Compute and explain corporate income taxes 

 

Additional Course Outcomes:    

2.    Demonstrate understanding of the workings and logic of the IRS tax code concerning C-Corporations, Partnerships or S-Corporations. 

3.    Apply general understanding and knowledge of IRS provisions relative to the above Business organizations. 

4.    Compare Federal tax ramifications to a Business organized as a Sole Proprietor, C-Corporation, Partnership or S-Corporation and the distributions thereof. 

5.    Explain recent changes in tax laws through basic research.  

6.    Complete C-Corporation, Partnership, and S-Corporation Tax Returns using Computerized Tax Software. 

 

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  

 

Measurement Tool 

 

Tests--5 @ 100 Points each 

500 Points 

Homework--Class Participation--10 Weeks  

300 Points 

Tax Research Problem  

50 Points 

Writing Assignment   

50 Points 

Computerized Tax Return Problems--3 @ 33.33 each 

100 Points 

 

 

Grading System: 

 

Letter Grade 

Range 

Definition 

90-100 

Excellent 

80-89 

Above Average 

70-79 

Average 

60-69 

Below Average 

0-59 

Failing 

----- 

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks 

WF 

----- 

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks 

NF 

----- 

Failing � not actively engaged 

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.   

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog. 

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog. 

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity. 

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.    

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.   

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:  {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.} 

 

 

Effective date: Fall 2017

 

 

ACT 344 - Not-For-Profit Accounting

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Accounting and Finance

Course Syllabus
ACT 344 - Not-For-Profit Accounting
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This course covers accounting theory and practice relating to Not-For-Profit and Governmental Accounting.

Course Prerequisite: ACT202 and ACT203

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Identify and solve various government and not-for-profit accounting issues

Note: Within the SLO above, the student will be able to do the following after finishing this course:

�        Differentiate the accounting framework for specialized organizations

�        Evaluate the nature and purpose of fund based accounting

�        Explain accounting principles for governmental units and not-for-profit organizations

�        Create financial statements for specialized organizations

Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on the Course Outline

Grading System:

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

Effective date: Summer 2018

ACT404X - Managerial Accounting

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Accounting and Finance
Course Syllabus
ACT404X - Managerial Accounting

Course Description: This course is a study of the area of accounting that provides relevant information to management for use in planning, organizing, directing, and controlling in the decision making process. 

Course Prerequisite: ACT 211

Student Learning Outcomes: 

With the completion of this course, the student will be able to:

1.      Develop a budget and explain its impact on the business organization

2.      Describe, explain and solve product/service costing techniques

3.      Describe and interpret basic asset management and planning documents

4.      Describe and summarize strategic cost management issues including its design and use

5.      Appraise the major components of performance evaluation systems

Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on course outline

Grading System:

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student's academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.  Note: please ask your instructor for their late policy on assignments.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation: Active Participation: Sullivan University cares that students attend their courses. Just as showing up for work is critically important to job security and work effectiveness, showing up for class is critically important for mastering the career skills and concepts necessary to obtain, maintain, and be promoted on a job. Every effort should be made to attend and academically engage in every class and/or laboratory session.

Attendance will be recorded for each class meeting and absences that exceed the standards of this policy will result in students being administratively dropped from the course(s) affected. Please ask your instructor if you have any attendance policy questions.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure for the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.


NOTE: The items below do not apply to online or hyprid courses.

Plus Friday: Plus Friday is one of Sullivan University�s unique approaches to assist students academically. This academic �extra� is designed to provide more individualized help for students who are behind in their studies, miss class during the week, or just want to get ahead for the next week. Full time faculty are on campus from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon (part time faculty are available by appointment) to provide assistance. For more details about Plus Friday, please see the catalog.

General Dress Standards: Students are expected to review and understand the dress guidelines under the heading Dress Standards in the current catalog. Although these standards may not satisfy everyone�s desire for personal dress freedom, we believe appropriate dress is important for the overall professional business image. Because we believe this is a constructive and vital part of your professional development, students are asked to follow these dress standards. These general dress standards will be enforced by the University faculty, staff and administration.

Professional Dress Wednesday: On Wednesdays, day students are to dress as if they were going on a job interview. Students who are not appropriately and professionally dressed will not be permitted to attend class. This particular dress requirement is not applicable to evening students.

Effective date: Fall 2017

ACT 405 Advanced Financial Accounting

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Accounting and Finance

Course Syllabus

ACT 405: Advanced Financial Accounting
Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: This course covers accounting issues related to business combinations, consolidated statements, foreign currency transactions and partnerships.

 

Course Prerequisites: ACT 202 and ACT 203

 

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course the student will be able to:

1.      Prepare and explain consolidated financial statements.

2.      Identify and translate FASB pronouncements

Note: Within the SLOs above, the student will be able to do the following after finishing this course:

�        Explain various elements of consolidations with the use of financial statements.

�        Summarize various elements of GAAP and iGAAP with the use of financial statements

�        Demonstrate other outcomes including: 

o   Explain and calculate various transactions related to foreign currency

o   Explain and contrast international accounting standards with U.S. based GAAP

o   Explain and calculate various transactions related to partnership formation and organization 

Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on the Course Outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

Effective date: Summer 2018

 

ACT 414 Senior Accounting Seminar

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Accounting and Finance
Course Syllabus
ACT 414: Senior Accounting Seminar
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This class is an analysis of GAAP related and managerial accounting concepts with an emphasis on practical applications and literature review. Research papers and case analysis are integral parts of the course coverage.

Course Prerequisite: ACT211

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will review and/or have a working knowledge on the following from a managerial accounting basis:

1.       Develop a budget and explain its impact on the business organization

2.       Explain and solve product/service costing techniques

3.       Interpret basic asset management and planning documents

4.       Describe working capital management practices and policies

5.       Explain consolidated statements

6.       Summarize strategic cost management issues, including its design and use

7.       Appraise the major components of performance evaluation systems

8.       Translate FASB pronouncements

9.       Describe long term financing and capital structures

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on the Course Outline       

Grading System:

 Letter Grade

 % Range

 Definition

 A

 90-100

 Excellent

 B

 80-89

 Above Average

 C

 70-79

 Average

 D

 60-69

 Below Average

 F

 0-59

 Failing

 W

 -----

 Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

 WF

 -----

 Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

 NF

 -----

 Failing - not actively engaged

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook. 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.  

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:  {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.}

Effective date: Summer 2018

ACT424X: Auditing

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY 
College of Accounting and Finance
Course Syllabus
ACT424X: Auditing
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This course is an introduction to auditing theory with an emphasis on auditing techniques for both internal and external auditing. The role of the auditor is examined: duties, legal responsibilities, and ethical issues.  

Course Prerequisite: ACT202 and ACT203

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.      Summarize the internal audit function

2.      Explain the procedures used within the external audit function

Note: Within the SLOs above, the student will be able to do the following after finishing this course:

* Summarize the role of the auditor, differentiating between internal and external auditing needs, procedures and types of audits with additional focus on the auditor's ethics
* Analyze a company's accounting information system and Financial Statements to determine audit risk to determine appropriate audit procedures, audit evidence required, test of internal control, and substantive tests
* Assess internal controls to support Financial Statement results

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on the Course Outline 

Grading System:

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.}

Effective date: Summer 2018

 

ACT425X Advanced Auditing

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY 
College of Accounting and Finance
Course Syllabus
ACT425X: Advanced Auditing
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This course builds on the student�s knowledge of auditing and an auditor�s responsibilities that were introduced in the prerequisite course. The audit process and methods are stressed through a combination of review and practical assignments. The course will cover terminology of information systems and the practical application of how to audit a computerized accounting system

Course Prerequisite: ACT424

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will have a working knowledge and/or reviewed the following SLOs:                   

1.      Describe and Interpret the components of an accounting information system

2.      Identify and translate FASB pronouncements

3.      Summarize the audit function

4.      Explain the procedures used within the external audit function

In addition to the SLOs mentioned above, the student will also do the following within these SLOs:

�        Regarding Information Systems, upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

o   Appraise a company's accounting information system as to audit risk, business risk, and audit planning

�        Regarding GAAP and IFRS, upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

o   Explain scope of an integrated audit and compliance with GAAP, Sarbanes-Oxley, and projected adaptation with IFRS.

�        Regarding internal audits and external audits, upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

o   Differentiate among audit approaches by internal auditors, external auditors and government auditors

o   Determine how best to manage audit risk by planning an audit

o   Critique effectiveness of testing and sampling results

o   Conduct a simulated audit and evaluate results using a hands-on approach by completing a practice case.

 

Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on the Course Outline

Grading System:

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus.}

 

Effective date: Summer 2018

ACT 430 Financial Accounting Seminar

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Accounting and Finance
Course Syllabus
ACT 430 � Financial Accounting Seminar
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This course is a study of GAAP and IASB related standards with an emphasis on practical application and literature review. Research papers and case analysis are integral parts of the course coverage.

Course Prerequisite: ACT 203

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will review and/or have working knowledge on the following from a financial accounting basis:

1.       Analyze and interpret long-term asset management concepts using financial statements 

2.       Analyze and interpret working capital concepts using financial statements

3.       Critique and explain various elements of consolidations with the use of financial statements

4.       Critique and explain various elements of information systems with the use of financial statements

5.       Critique and explain various elements of GAAP and iGAAP with the use of financial statements

6.       Analyze various finance concepts with the use of financial statements

7.       Critique and explain audit opinions used in external audit documents with the use of financial statements

Assessment of Outcomes:

�         Internet assignments

�         Problem review assignments

�         Case/problem analysis and discussion

�         Project assignments and discussion

Grading System:

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged


For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: {Any discipline (program)-specific needs should be addressed on the master course syllabus}

Effective date: Summer 2018

FIN354X SECURITY ANALYSIS & PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

SECURITY ANALYSIS & PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

FINANCE 354 Online

 

         
 

 

TEXT:  Herbert B. Mayo, Investments: An Introduction - 12th Edition ISBN-9781305638419  

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

 

The course is intended to provide in-depth understanding of security analysis and portfolio management.  The course will emphasize both theoretical and applied aspects of portfolio analysis, financial planning and security analysis.  Topics include:  risk analysis, equity portfolio construction, bond portfolio construction, equity analysis, bond analysis, portfolio performance evaluation, and international diversification.

 

 

PREREQUISITES:

 

Finance 324 (Financial Management) and Finance 334 (Investments) are required.  A good foundation is also therefore expected in the areas of economics, accounting, financial statement analysis, statistics, time value of money, technical and fundamental analysis, and the use of the computer.  If you are deficient in any of these areas, it is your responsibility to correct that deficiency for this class since very little time will be devoted to review of these fundamentals.

 

 

POLICIES:

 

A. Cheating will not be tolerated and will be dealt with in accordance with university regulations.

B. Students are responsible for any readings assigned whether discussed in class or not.

C. A grade of incomplete will not be given for failing or marginal work. 

D. An HP-10BII calculator is required for this course. 

E. ALL ASSIGNMENTS ARE TO BE SUBMITTED TO THE ASSIGNMENT'S DROP BOX NO LATER THAN SUNDAY AT 6PM EST. AT THE CONCLUSION OF THE WEEK THEY HAVE BEEN ASSIGNED.  NO EXCEPTIONS AS LATE WORK WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION:

 

Exam 1 15%

Exam 2 20%

Weekly Assignments 45%

Final Exam       20%

 

Grades:

A=90-100%    B=80-90%       C=70-79%      D=60-69%      F=59%

 

 

Also note that I reserve the right to raise a student�s grade if the student show above average input and/or participation and the upgrade is not unreasonable in my opinion.  Similarly, when students are not prepared to participate in class, or do not post assignments as required, I reserve the right to reduce grades for what I ascertain to be below average input and/or participation.  You are expected to participate!!

 

 

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

 

The University Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities establishes rights to which the student is entitled and the responsibilities which the student must assume.

 

Along with preparing for and attending class, each student has the responsibility of promoting high academic standards.  High academic standards will not allow Sullivan Universityto tolerate cheating, plagiarism, disruption of class, or other inappropriate behavior.  The University has a strong policy of action against students who cheat, plagiarize, or conduct themselves inappropriately in the classroom (onground or online).

 

Active Participation: Sullivan University cares that students attend their courses. Just as showing up for work is critically important to job security and work effectiveness, showing up for class is critically important for mastering the career skills and concepts necessary to obtain, maintain, and be promoted on a job. Every effort should be made to attend and academically engage in every class and/or laboratory session. If it becomes necessary for a student to drop a course, or to withdraw from school entirely, an official withdrawal form should be completed in Enrollment Services at the Louisville campus, in Academic Services at the Lexington campus, in the Administrative Office at the Fort Knox campus, and/or for online courses, by contacting the online academic services staff at online@sullivan.edu. All students who withdraw or are withdrawn from the University are required to complete a Financial Aid Exit Interview with the Financial Planning Department.


For attendance purposes, students in online classes are required to log into and participate within their online courses each week of the quarter. Students not in contact with the faculty member or active in the course risk being dropped from the course by the faculty member with a �NF� grade. See the attendance policy.

Attendance will be recorded for each class meeting and absences that exceed the standards of this policy will result in students being administratively dropped from the course(s) affected.  Attendance is taken and instructors are directed to report student attendance through the University�s student records management system.

Students should be aware that credit hours associated with a course require a significant amount of work outside formal instruction.

For more information about attendance and credit hours�including the variations that apply to labs, live, and online courses�please see the current catalog online, accessible through the student portal. 

 

 

 

 

COURSE CONTENT

 

         

WEEK 1:        Chapter 1 An Introduction to Investments.  

 

WEEK 2:         Chapter 2 The Investment Process and Financial Concepts Q 6,7 & 9  

                       

WEEK 3:         Chapter 4 Financial Planning, Taxation, and the Efficiency of Financial Markets    Prob. 1, 3 and 5. you Must show work.

 

WEEK 4:         EXAM 1 

 

WEEK 5:         Chapter 9 The Valuation of Common Stock  P.1,2,4,5 and 8 SHOW WORK 

 

WEEK 6:         Chapter 11 The Macroeconomic Environment for Investment Decisions Q1,2,3,5 & 7 

 

WEEK 7:         EXAM 2 

                       

WEEK 8:         Chapter 12 Behavioral Finance & Technical Analysis Q. 1,2,5,7 and 8 

 

WEEK 9:         Chapter 14 The Valuation of Fixed Income Securities  Q. 8 and P. 3,12,17,& 25. Also Financial Advisor's Case "Teaching Guides for the Financial Advisor's Case: High Yield Secuities and Relative Risk".  

 

WEEK 10:       Chapter 20 Investing and Portfolio Management in an Efficient Market Context The Financial Advisor's Case, page 770 

 

WEEK 11:       FINAL EXAM 

 

 

All Rights Reserved Sullivan University System

 

FIN324 Financial Management

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration
Course Syllabus
FIN324 - Financial Management
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: A study of the techniques which enable firms to efficiently manage their financial resources and maximize the value of their owner�s investment. Topics include: financial analysis and planning, markets and institutions, time value of money and bond and stock valuation.

Course Prerequisite: ACT103

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�         Explain the concept of firm intrinsic value and how business formations, corporate governance and ethics contribute to firm value

�         Demonstrate the flow of capital from savers to borrowers in an efficient process

�         Analyze financial statement in order to find potential problems

�         Demonstrate the importance of measuring cash flows at different times and apply these techniques in financial situations

�         Describe interest rates and how these rates are calculated for corporate debt

�         Calculate the value of corporate debt and investor return for corporate debt

�         Describe how return and risk works together and how investor use this model to determine the return require for stock investors

�         Calculate the value of an asset

�         Calculate the cost borrowing money and selling stocks in a corporation�s capital structure


Assessment of Outcomes: Weekly homework, quizzes, final project, discussions

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged


Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

FIN334 Investments

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration
Course Syllabus
FIN334:  Investments 

Course Description:

This is an introductory course intended to develop the student�s knowledge and understanding of domestic and foreign financial markets, investment vehicles and investment strategies. Topics include investment goals and objectives, market efficiency, market operations, technical and fundamental analysis, sources of information, and valuation techniques. Social, ethical and political factors are considered where appropriate.

Course Prerequisite: FIN 324

Course Outcomes:

Upon successful conclusion of FIN334 the student will be able to:

�         Construct a well diversified investment portfolio

�         Discuss how various financial markets operate

�         Perform a fundamental and technical analysis of common stock

Assessment of Outcomes:

Student learning will be assessed by weekly study questions and quizzes, a final exemption, and a written Investment Project

Grading System:

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

 

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

FIN 344 Analysis of Financial Statements

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration
FIN 344: Analysis of Financial Statements 
Syllabus

Course Description: The construction of financial statements for planning and reporting purposes and the analysis and interpretation of financial statements for management and investment purposes is undertaken. Applications include the evaluation of statements of actual businesses. Legal and theoretical concepts as well as financial are considered. Use of the statements in areas such as credit analysis, acquisition, and investment are considered.

Course Prerequisite: ECO202, FIN324
 

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of the course and in order to demonstrate mastery of the course goals, you will:

�        Calculate and interpret relevant financial ratios from financial statements.

�        Do a top-down analysis of a firm to determine its strengths and weaknesses.

�        Read, comprehend and interpret financial statement footnotes.

�        Perform a cash flow analysis of a firm.

�        Identify areas where rules of income or expense recognition may mislead the novice investor.

�        Make and defend analytic adjustments where warranted.

�        Integrate financial data with other information to form a corporate strategy.

Assessment of Outcomes:

�        Homework problems

�        Quizzes

�        Project

Grading System:

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

 

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

 

FIN364x International Finance

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business
Course Syllabus
FIN364x - International Finance

Course Description: Study of corporate finance within an international context.  Discusses exchange rates, parity conditions, capital flows, country risk analysis, foreign investment, and international banking.  Examines the financing strategies and capital budgeting techniques of multinational corporations.

Course Prerequisite: FIN 324 - Principles of Finance (or equivalent)

Course Outcomes:           

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

�         Compare and contrast MNCs� decision-making processes

�         Differentiate between ethical and unethical behaviors for U.S. businesses operating in foreign markets

�         Analyze foreign exchange markets and the factors and risks influencing exchange rates

�         Demonstrate different methods of arbitrage and interest rate parity used by international governments

�         Analyze the relationships among inflation, interest rates, and foreign exchange rates

�         Make use of forecasting exchange rate methods for business modeling

�         Illustrate a MNCs capital budget process

�         Outline a country�s risk analysis, by using risk measurement techniques and benchmarking risk ratings across countries

�         Analyze the impact of long-term debt financing and match it to the inflow currency

�         Discover international cash management by optimizing cash flow and assessing the impact of liquidity requirements
 

Assessment of Outcomes: 

Assessment of learning will be done through discussions, short papers, a research project, and Mid-term and Final exams

Grading System:

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

College of Allied Health

MED173 - Anatomy and Physiology II

Sullivan University
College of Allied Health 
Course Syllabus
Course #MED173 Anatomy and Physiology II
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This is a continuation of Course MSS123 with emphasis on the circulatory system, body defenses and immunity, urinary, respiratory, digestive, and reproductive systems.  Further discussion of disease processes will be included.

Course Prerequisite:  MSS123 (or MED172)
 

Class Time:
Residential: 4 days per week, 11 weeks, 50 minutes per day or                       
1 evening per week, 11 weeks, 3 hours and 20 minutes per evening

Distance Education: 11 weeks

Required Text(s) and Resources:
The Human Body in Health and Disease- 13th Edition, Barbara Janson Cohen; Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins 2015.

Study Guide for The Human Body in Health and Disease- 13th Edition.  Kerry L. Hull & Barbara Janson Cohen; Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins 2015.

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.            List major organs for each listed body system

2.            Describe the normal function of each listed body system

3.            Identify common pathology related to each listed body system

4.            Analyze pathology as it relates to the interaction of listed body systems

5.            Discuss implications for disease and disability when homeostasis not maintained 

6.            Describe implications for treatment related to pathology of the listed body systems

7.            Describe the relationship between anatomy and physiology of the listed body systems and medications used for treatment in each

8.            Compare body structure and function of the human body across the life span

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

Grading System:


 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing – not actively engaged

                                                                                     

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.  

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog.  

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: *** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

A minimum of 70% (“C”) is required to pass the course for the overall grade.

MED173 – Anatomy and Physiology II
MAERB 2015 Standards

Cognitive
I.C.1 Describe structural organization of the human body
I.C.2 Identify body systems
I.C.3 Describe: 
I.C.4 List major organs in each body system
I.C.5 Identify the anatomical location of major organs in each body system
I.C.6 Compare body structure and function of the human body across the life span
I.C.7 Describe the normal function of each body system
I.C.8 Identify common pathology related to each body system including:

a.        Signs

b.       Symptoms

c.        Etiology

I.C.9 Analyze pathology for each body system including:       

a.        diagnostic measures

b.       treatment modalities

IV.C.1 Describe dietary nutrients including:

a.            Carbohydrates

b.            Fat

c.            Protein

d.            Minerals

e.            Electrolytes

f.             Vitamins

g.            Fiber

h.            Water

IV.C.2 Define the function of dietary supplements
IV.C.3 Identify the special dietary needs for:

a.            Weight control

b.            Diabetes

c.            Cardiovascular disease

d.            Hypertension

e.            Cancer

f.             Lactose sensitivity

g.            Gluten-free

h.            Food allergies

V.C.10 Define both medical terms and abbreviations related to all body systems

MED176 - Medical Terminology

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Allied Heatlh

Course Syllabus

Course #176:  Medical Terminology

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: Students learn the prefixes, roots and suffixes used in medical terminology.  Medical specialties, operative terms and medical records terms complete the instruction.

 

Course Prerequisite:  None

 

Class Time:

Residential: 4 days per week, 11 weeks, 50 minutes per day or

                       1 evening per week, 11 weeks, 3 hours and 20 minutes per evening

Distance Education: 11 weeks

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Recognize and understand words in the daily use of medical terminology.

2.       Build appropriate medical terms from word parts learned, given the meaning of the word

3.       Identify new word parts in other medical terms and having learned the meaning, to be able to use these new words to both build and understand further medical terms.

4.       Build a complete professional vocabulary with expected proficiency in usage and spelling.

5.       Be recognize the importance and definition of words commonly used in medical transcription of routine medical report

 

COURSE TEXTBOOK & RESOURCES

Leonard, P. Building a medical vocabulary: With Spanish translations (10th ed.), 2018. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.

 

Stedman, Stedman’s Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing 7th Edition, 2011; Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing – not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: A minimum grade of 70% C is required to pass the class.

*** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies (see attached addendum list) prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA or MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

COMPETENCY EVALUATIONS COMPLETED IN THIS COURSE

The following evaluations are graded.  Students must attain a score of 90 or above on each competency skill to successfully complete the course.  Participation in plus Friday tutoring is strongly advised for any student having difficulty in meeting these competencies. 

The student must successfully complete all of the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competencies may be completed as an independent check off, as a component of another competency check off, or evaluation by means of course exams.

MED211 Medical Terminology
MAERB 2015 Standards


Cognitive

V.C.9 Identify medical terms labeling the word parts
V.C.10 Define medical terms and abbreviations related to all body systems

CCS110 - College Success Strategies

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

Allied Health Division

Course Syllabus

Course #CCS110:  College Success Strategies

Credit Hours: 2

 

Course Description: This course is designed to assist new students in developing strategies for a successful college experience, as well as strategies for achieving career goals.  Students will develop oral communication skills, learn time management strategies, and improve study skills necessary to be successful in the college environment and the workplace. 

Course Prerequisites:  None

Class Participation Requirements:  Attendance is taken on Mondays and Wednesdays.  Adhering to Sunday and Wednesday assignment deadlines will ensure that attendance requirements are met.                                           

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.      Create an action plan of steps to achieve a goal. 

2.      Describe active learning and how to use it in a college class.

3.      Discuss the different learning styles and how each style can learn in a class setting.

4.      Demonstrate critical thinking and writing skills.

5.      Discuss academic skills, time management, listening and learning, reading the text and test taking strategies. 

6.      Utilize the Learning Resource Center (LRC) to complete course assignments.

7.      Demonstrate computer skills, including use of campus email.

8.      Complete Which Way training module 1

9.      Discuss chemical dependency- risks and prevention

10.   Develop strategies for prevention and awareness of domestic violence and sexual assault by learning to recognize abusive behavior- including dating violence, stalking, and rape

11.   Critique speaking and presentation skills.

12.   Describe stress management skills.

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing – not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog. 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:

Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

The student must successfully complete all of the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competencies may be completed as an independent check off, as a component of another competency check off, or evaluation by means of course exams.

1.      Compose professional correspondence utilizing electronic technology

2.      Demonstrate respect for diversity in approaching patients and families

3.      Coach patients appropriately considering: cultural diversity, developmental life stage, communication barriers

4.      Use appropriate body language and other non-verbal skills in communicating with patients, family, and staff with an understanding of nonverbal communication

5.      Analyze communications in providing appropriate responses/feedback

6.      Demonstrate respect for individual diversity, incorporating awareness of one’s own biases in areas including gender, race, religion, age, and economic status

 

 

 

                             

 

 

 


All Rights Reserved Sullivan University System

 

 

 

CLS302X - Genetics

Sullivan University

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #CLS302X Genetics

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: This course includes basic genetic principles, with emphasis on biochemical and molecular technologies that are used to study human health and disease.

Course Prerequisite:  BCHE301

 

Class Time:

Distance Education: 11 weeks

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       describe all areas of classic Mendelian genetics

2.       distinguish between population and evolutionary genetics

3.       define molecular genetics

4.       describe recombinant DNA technologies

5.       recognize the genetic principles of human health and disease

6.       gain a basic knowledge of clinical application with regards to genetics.

Text:

Brooker, Robert J. (2015) Genetics: Analysis and Principles, 5th edition. New York: McGraw Hill.    ISBN-13: 978-0073525341

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing – not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: 

A mandatory overall course grade of 70% or higher (“C” grade) is required in the class for credit/pass.

CLS402X - Parasitology,Mycology

Sullivan University

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #CLS402X Parasitology/Mycology

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: The course is designed to provide the student with extensive coverage of parasitic and fungal organisms and the disease processes associated with these organisms. Parasitic life cycles, transmission, and the correlations of clinical signs and symptoms of infections are discussed. The course presents the biology and physiology of fungi including epidemiology, disease states, and laboratory identification.

Course Prerequisite:  BIO202

 

Class Time:

Distance Education: 11 weeks

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       identify pathogenicity of fungal groups

2.       demonstrate an understanding of the laboratory methods used for identification of parasites and fungi

3.       identify common fungi

4.       identify pathogenicity of fungal groups

5.       demonstrate an understanding of the laboratory methods used for identification of parasites and fungi

 

Text:

Clinical Parasitology – A Practical Approach; 2nd Edition, Zeibig, E., Elseveir: 2013.

Medical Mycology, Kern& Blevins; F.A. Davis: 2012.

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing – not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: 

A mandatory overall course grade of 70% or higher (“C” grade) is required in the class for credit/pass.

HIM001X - Medical Coding Practicum and CCA Review

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health

Health Information Management

Course Syllabus
HIM001X - Medical Coding Practicum and CCA Review

Credit Hours: 0

Course Description: This course provides students with an opportunity to practice coding skills linking those skills to the Medical Coding Diploma Learning OUtcomes.  Students will submit coded case studies in preparation for the CCA exam upon graduation.

Course Prerequisite: To be taken in final quarter

Required Text(s) and Resources:

Green, M.A. (2016). 3-2-1 Code It! Workbook (7th ed.). Clifton Park, NY:Delmar Cengage Learning. ISBN-13: 9781337902816.

Certified Coding Associate (CCA) Exam Prep 6th ed., bundled with Exam Voucher. AHIMA. ISBN: 9781584265764.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

·        Apply coding guidelines to code case studies

·        Prepare for a job interview

·        Schedule CCA exam

Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on Course Outline.

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog. It is also contained in the page titled Academic Integrity Policy within the Syllabus and Important Course Documents folder.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

Course Outline

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is made available Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at midnight, on Sunday, January 17. Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.

Assignments

Due

View Dates

Week 1: Introduction to the CCA Review Course

 

 Assignment 1.1 - Case Studies

 Sunday

 Assignment 1.2 - Career Services

 Sunday

 Assignment 1.3 - Registration for the CCA Exam

 Sunday

Week 2: Continuing Education Units (CEUs)

 

 Assignment 2.1 - Case Studies

 Sunday

 Assignment 2.2 - Continuing Education Unit

 Sunday

Week 3: Domain I: Clinical Classification Systems

 

 Assignment 3.1 - Case Studies

 Sunday

Week 4: Domain II: Reimbursement Methodologies

 

 Assignment 4.1 - Case Studies

 Sunday

Week 5: Mock CCA Exam

 

 Assignment 5.1 - Case Studies

 Sunday

 Assignment 5.2 - Mock CCA Exam

 Thursday

 Assignment 5.3 - Required Books for the CCA Exam

 Sunday

 Assignment 5.4 - CCA Exam Date

 Sunday

Week 6: Domain III: Health Records and Data Content

 

 Assignment 6.1 - Case Studies

 Sunday

Week 7: Domain IV: Compliance

 

 Assignment 7.1 - Case Studies

 Sunday

Week 8: Domain V: Information Technology

 

 Assignment 8.1 - Case Studies

 Sunday

Week 9: Domain VI: Confidentiality and Privacy

 

 Assignment 9.1 - Case Studies

 Sunday

Week 10: Wrapping It Up

 

 Assignment 10.1 - Case Studies

 Sunday

Week 11: Finals Week

 

Assignment 11.1 - Mock CCA Exam

 Thursday

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Written assignments, Case studies,  and Mock exams

Grading Criteria

Assignment

Weight

 Written Assignments

10%

 Case Studies

55%

 Mock Exams

35%

 Total 

 100%

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy
Late assignments are NOT permitted in this course.  All assignments are due per the calendar/course schedule.  

Assignment Descriptions

Case Studies: You are required to submit weekly case studies that you will need to utilize your knowledge from your prior courses and the coding guidelines to assign ICD-10-CM/PCS and CPT codes.


Mock Exams: 
You will have two mock practice exams (Week 5 and Week 11). These will simulate what you will see during your CCA exam. You will provide a copy of your exam results along with a 100-150 word paper that outlines which domains were your weakest and strongest along with a plan to improve your score.

Written Assignments/Papers:  Required written assignments will consist of researching and developing plans for achieving your continuing education units upon receipt of your CCA credential, registering for your CCA exam and conducting research on what items are allowed during your CCA exam.


Grading Explanation
 

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking, show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area, highly developed communication and presentation skills. Work is of outstanding quality.

B
Above Average
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category. Work is of very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects of the subject matter. Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or creative thinking. Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.

F
Failing
0-59%

Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements, shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills. Work is of unacceptable quality.

 

HIM002X - Health Information Technology

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health

Health Information Management

 

Course Syllabus
HIM002X - Health Information Technology

Credit Hours: 0

Course Description: This course reviews the practical aspects of health information technology, health data structure, content, standards, data monitoring and compliance reporting, National Healthcare Information Infrastructure and documentation requirements are reviewed as well as the types and content of the health record. 

Course Prerequisite: To be taken in last quarter

Required Text(s) and Resources: Carter, D. and Shaw P. (2018). Registered health information technician (RHIT) exam preparation 7th ed. Bundled with RHIT exam, voucher. AHIMA Press. ISBN 9781584265801

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

·         Create a professional resume and work with Career Services for job placement

·         Complete six domain practice exams with an 85% or higher

·         Complete two mock exams with an 85% or higher

·         Complete research and develop a plan to obtain continuing education units (CEUs)

·         Develop a study plan for the RHIT exam

Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on Course Outline

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog. It is also contained in the page titled Academic Integrity Policy within the Syllabus and Important Course Documents folder.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

Course Schedule

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is made available Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at 11:55 p.m., on Sunday, January 17.

Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.

Assignments

Due Dates

View Dates 

Week 1: Introduction to the RHIT Review Course

 

Assignment 1.1 - Career Services Appointment 

 Sunday

Week 2: Continuing Education Units

 

Assignment 2.1 - Continuing Education Units

Sunday

Week 3: Study Plan for the RHIT Exam

 

Assignment 3.1 – Study Plan for the RHIT Exam

Sunday

Week 4: Data Content, Structure and Information Governance

 

Assignment 4.1 - Domain I – Data Content, Structure and Information Governance
Assignment 4.2 - Reflection Paper

Sunday

Week 5: Mock RHIT Exam

 

Assignment 5.1 - Mock RHIT Exam
Assignment 5.2 - Reflection Paper  

Thursday
Sunday

Week 6: Access, Disclosure, Privacy and Security

 

Assignment 6.1 - Domain II – Access, Disclosure, Privacy and Security
Assignment 6.2 - Reflection Paper

Sunday

Week 7: Data Analytics and Use

 

Assignment 7.1 - Domain III – Data Analytics and Use
Assignment 7.2 - Reflection Paper

Sunday

Week 8: Revenue Cycle Management

 

Assignment 8.1 - Domain IV – Revenue Cycle Management
Assignment 8.2 - Reflection Paper

Sunday

Week 9: Compliance

 

Assignment 9.1 - Compliance
Assignment 9.2 - Reflection Paper

Sunday 

Week 10: Leadership

 

Assignment 10.1 - Domain VI - Leadership
Assignment 10.2 – Reflection Paper            

Sunday 

Week 11: Mock RHIT Exam

 

Assignment 11.1 - Mock RHIT Exam
Assignment 11.2 - Reflection Paper

Thursday

Assessment of Outcomes       

Assignments

Weight

Domain Practice Exams

40%

Mock Exams

45%

Written Assignments

10%

Discussions

5%

Total

100%

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy
All assignments are due Sunday each week.  Each student will be allowed two late assignments.  The request to submit a late assignment must be received by the instructor no later than 12:00pm, Eastern on Monday after the week closes.  The late assignment(s) will be due by Thursday, 11:55pm, Eastern and five points per day will be deducted.  Any subsequent late assignment (assignment three forward) will be scored as a zero if not completed by Sunday each week. This policy only applies to assignments.  Quizzes, exams and discussions are not eligible for late submissions.

If you experience technical difficulties in the LMS that may result in a late assignment, you must immediately contact the 24/7 Online Support Center (toll free) at 1-888-720-6684 and try to resolve the issue. The Online Support Center keeps track of all support calls made by students.

Assignment Descriptions

Domain Practice Exams
The practice exams provide you timed practice in the six domains for the RHIT exam. 

Mock Exams
The mock exam provides you with timed practice for the RHIT exam (includes all seven domains).

Written Assignments
The written assignments include an appointment with Career Services, which will assist you in preparing your resume, interviewing techniques and schedule interviews for you. You also complete a study plan which helps you develop a plan of study for the RHIT exam. You write a paper after completing research on Continuing Education Units, which helps you begin the thinking process on CEUs required for the credential and begin planning on obtaining the required CEUs. Each week, you write a reflection paper to be submitted with your practice exam. 

 

 

Grading Explanation

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking,
show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area,
highly developed communication and presentation skills.  Work is of outstanding quality.

B
Above Average
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity
with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and
presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category.  Work is of
very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects
of the subject matter.  Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability
to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or
creative thinking.  Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.  

F
Failing
0-59%

Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements,
shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills.  Work is of
unacceptable quality.

 

Active Participation
Sullivan University cares that students attend their courses. Just as showing up for work is critically important to job security and work effectiveness, showing up for class is critically important for mastering the career skills and concepts necessary to obtain, maintain, and be promoted on a job. Every effort should be made to attend and academically engage in every class and/or laboratory session.

For attendance purposes, students in online classes are required to log into and participate within their online courses each week of the quarter. Students not in contact with the faculty member or active in the course risk being dropped from the course by the faculty member with a “NF” grade. See the attendance policy. Attendance will be recorded for each class meeting and absences that exceed the standards of this policy will result in students being administratively dropped from the course(s) affected. Attendance is taken and instructors are directed to report student attendance through the University’s student records management system.

HIM101 - Medical Terminology

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health

Health Information Management

HIM101 Medical Terminology
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This course is designed to teach the skills necessary for helping students understand and properly use medical terminology by presenting a foundation of roots, prefixes and suffixes. It integrates word building and definitions to body systems, anatomy and physiology, examination, procedures, treatment and abbreviations used in oral communications, written correspondence and medical records.

Course Prerequisite: None

Required Text(s) and Resources: Fremgen and Frucht. Medical Terminology: A Living Language. Pearson. 7th Edition. ISBN: 9780134701202.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

·        Master the fundamentals of word analysis, including the separation of terms into word roots or combining forms, prefixes, and suffixes

·        Correctly spell medical terms

·        Define medical terms organized by body systems

·        Define the relationships among illnesses, procedures, and diagnostic terms

·        Identify abbreviations and pathological terms associated with body systems

·        Identify lab and radiological terms related to procedures

·        Identify the relationship between medical terms and their synonyms used in word phrases and symbols used to describe the various states of health and disease of the human body

·        Develop the ability to read and understand the language of medicine in various contexts

·        Analyze medical phrases for the meaning of prefixes, suffixes, physiological, pathologic, procedural, and diagnostic terms, lab tests, x-rays, and abbreviations

·        Build a professional vocabulary for communicating in writing as preparation for working in the medical field 

Assessment of Outcomes: Assignments, Examinations

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog. It is also contained in the page titled Academic Integrity Policy within the Syllabus and Important Course Documents folder.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Course Schedule

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is made available Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at 11:55 p.m., on Sunday, January 17.

Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.

Assignments

Due Dates
View Dates

Week 1: Introduction to Medical Terminology

 

Readings 
Chapters 1 and 2

Sunday

Discussions 
Discussion 1.1 - Introductions
Discussion 1.2 - Orientation
Discussion 1.3  - Pre-Competency Exam

First post by
Wednesday
Responses to 
peers by Sunday

Assignment
Assignment 1.1 - Pre-Competency Exam

Wednesday

Assessments 
Quiz 1.1

Sunday

Week 2: Integumentary System

 

Readings 
Chapter 3

Sunday

Discussions 
Discussion 2.1 - Integumentary System

First post by
Wednesday
Responses to 
peers by Sunday

Assignments 
Assignment 2.1 - Medical Term Exercise

Sunday

Assessments
Quiz 2.1

Sunday

Week 3: Musculoskeletal System

 

Readings
Chapter 4

Sunday

Discussions
Discussion 3.1 - Medical Terminology

First post by Wednesday
Responses to 
peers by Sunday

Assignments
Assignment 3.1 - Medical Term Exercise

Sunday

Assessments
Quiz 3.1

Sunday

Week 4: Cardiovascular System

 

Readings
Chapter 5

Sunday

Discussions

Discussion 4.1 – Signs vs. Symptoms

 

First post by Wednesday
Responses to 
peers by Sunday

Assignments

Assignment 4.1 – Medical Term Exercise
 

Sunday

Assessments

Quiz 4.1

Sunday

Week 5: Blood, Lymphatic and Immune Systems

 

Readings

Chapter 6

Sunday

Discussions

Discussion 5.1 - Syndromes

First post by Wednesday
Responses to 
peers by Sunday

Assignments

Assignment 5.1 – Medical Term Exercise

Sunday

Assessments

Quiz 5.1

Sunday 

Midterm Exam

Thursday

Week 6: Respiratory System

 

Readings

Chapter 7

Sunday 

Discussions

Discussion 6.1 – Respiratory Diagnosis

First post by WednesdayResponses to 
peers by Sunday

Assignments

Assignment 6.1 Medical Term Exercise

Sunday

Assessments

Quiz 6.1

Sunday

Week 7: Digestive System

 

Readings

Chapter 8

Sunday

Discussions

Discussion 7.1 - GERD

First post by Wednesday
Responses to 
peers by Sunday

Assignments

Assignment 7.1 – Medical Term Exercise

Sunday

Assessments

Quiz 7.1

Sunday

Week 8: Urinary and Reproductive Systems

 

Readings

Chapters 9 and 10

Sunday

Discussions

Discussion 8.1 – Diagnosis Pyelonephritis

 

First post by Wednesday
Responses to 
peers by Sunday

Assignments

Assignment 8.1 – Medical Term Exercise

Sunday

Assessments

Quiz 8.1

Sunday

Week 9: Endrocrine System

 

Readings

Chapter 11

Sunday 

Discussions

Discussion 9.1 – Diabetes Mellitus

First post by Wednesday
Responses to 
peers by Sunday

Assignments

Assignment 9.1 – Medical Term Exercise

Sunday

Assessments

Quiz 9.1

Sunday 

Week 10: Nervous System and Special Senses

 

Readings

Chapters 12 and 13

Sunday 

Discussions

Discussion 10.1 – Parkinson’s Disease

First post by Wednesday
Responses to 
peers by Sunday

Assignments

Assignment 10.1 – Medical Term Exercise

Sunday 

Week 11: Finals Week

 

Discussions

Discussion 11.1 – Final Thoughts

First post by Wednesday
Responses to 
peers by Thursday

Assessments

Final Exam

Thursday

Assessment of Outcomes       

Assignments

Weight

Discussions

15%

Assignments

20%

Quizzes

25%

Midterm

20%

Final

20%

Total

100%

 

 

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy
All assignments are due Sunday each week.  Each student will be allowed two late assignments.  The request to submit a late assignment must be received by the instructor no later than 12:00pm, Eastern on Monday after the week closes.  The late assignment(s) will be due by Thursday, 11:55pm, Eastern and five points per day will be deducted.  Any subsequent late assignment (assignment three forward) will be scored as a zero if not completed by Sunday each week. This policy only applies to assignments.  Quizzes, exams and discussions are not eligible for late submissions.

If you experience technical difficulties in the LMS that may result in a late assignment, you must immediately contact the 24/7 Online Support Center (toll free) at 1-888-720-6684 and try to resolve the issue. The Online Support Center keeps track of all support calls made by students.

Assignment Descriptions

Discussions
Discussions in online courses attempt to equal discussions in a face-to-face class. The quality of online discussions depends upon the quality and thoughtfulness of your input. Your initial contribution in your own words is due by Wednesday each week, and your follow-up responses to at least two peers are due by Sunday. Your contributions are evaluated by means of the discussion rubric. The forums are set to "post first," which means you must post your contribution before you can see the contributions of others. This is to encourage independent thought. You are free to disagree with your peers, but courtesy is always expected. The textbook is a great starting point for your discussions, but is not considered scholarly, therefore it is not a valid reference.

Assignments

The weekly assignment(s) provides exercise for you to practice prior to taking the weekly quiz. 

Each week there is an ungraded Medical Term Analysis Practice Exercise for you to parse medicinal terms into their word parts and identify their meaning.  Your instructor will send you an answer key each week for the worksheets included in the week. If you do not receive an answer key by Wednesday after the week is opened, be sure to contact your instructor.

Each week there is also a graded Medical Term Exercise that emulates the quiz. The exercise consists of approximately 20 terms to identify, analyze, and spell. You will be able to review the right answers in order to prepare for the quiz.

Grading Explanation

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking, show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area, highly developed communication and presentation skills. Work is of outstanding quality.

B
Above Average
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category. Work is of very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects of the subject matter. Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or creative thinking. Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.

F
Failing
0-59%

Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements, shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills. Work is of unacceptable quality.

 

HIM110 - Pathophysiology with Pharmacology

 SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Health Information Management
Course Syllabus
HIM110 - Pathophysiology with Pharmacology 
Credit hours: 4

Course Description: Introduction to the study of the functions of the body systems, diseases of the body systems and the medications used in treatment of the diseases. The study is enhanced through analysis of case studies and application of the knowledge for diagnosis and procedure coding.

Course Prerequisite: None

Required Text(s) and Resources:  VanMeter, K.C., & Hubert, R.J. (2017). Pathophysiology for the Health Professions (6th Ed.). St. Louis, MO: Saunders. 
ISBN: 9780323414425
 

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 
 

·         Recognize the sequence of cellular injury, immune response, and inflammation that can underlie allergic, infectious, and autoimmune processes

·         Discuss the role of pathophysiology and how it guides health care professionals in planning, selecting, and evaluating the treatments used in specific diseases
 

·         Describe common disorders of specific body systems in terms of etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic testing, complications, treatment modalities, and expected outcomes
 

·         Use appropriate medical terminology
 

·         Evaluate and explain clinical manifestations of specific diseases
 

·         Discuss the differences in disease processes as they relate to age, heredity, environment, stress and immune response
 

·         Discuss the differences in acute and chronic disease processes

 

Assessment of Outcomes: The course assesses achievement of objectives using discussions, quizzes, case studies, a research paper, midterm and final examinations.
 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  It is also contained in the page titled Academic Integrity Policy within the Syllabus and Important Course Documents folder.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

Course Outline

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is made available Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at midnight, on Sunday, January 17.

Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.

Assignments

View Dates

Week 1: Introduction to Pathophysiology

Readings
Chapters 1, 5 & 7

Sunday

Discussions
Discussion 1.1 - Cellular Adaptations and Immunity

First post by Wednesday
Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments
Assignment 1.1 - Case Study
Research Paper topic selection

Sunday

Assessments
Quiz 1.1

Sunday

Week 2: Effects of Altered Status/Growth and Development on Disease Processes 

Readings
Chapters 2, 6, & 20-13

Sunday

Discussions
Discussion 2.1 - Scoliosis/Infectious Mononucleosis

First post by Wednesday
Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments
Assignment 2.1 - Case Study

Sunday

Assessments
Quiz 2.1

Sunday

Week 3: The Influence of Stress, Pain, Substance Abuse, Environmental Hazards and Introduction to Basic Pharmacology 

Readings
Chapters 4 & 24-27

Sunday

Discussions
Discussion 3.1 - Pain Control/Means of Administration

First post by Wednesday
Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments
Assignment 3.1 - Case Study

Sunday

Assessments
Quiz 3.1

Sunday

Week 4: Blood and Lymphatic Disorders 

Readings
Chapters 3, 10-12, & 28

Sunday

Discussions
Discussion 4.1 - Substances in the Blood/Shock

First post by Wednesday
Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments
Assignment 4.1 - Case Study

Sunday

Assessments
Quiz 4.1

Sunday

Week 5: Respiratory Disorders 

Readings
Chapter 13

Sunday

Discussions
Discussion 5.1 - Pneumonia Respiratory Infection

First post by Wednesday
Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments
Assignment 5.1 - Case Study

Sunday

Assessments
Midterm Exam

Thursday

Week 6: Digestive System and Urinary System Disorders 

Readings
Chapters 17 & 18

Sunday

Discussions
Discussion 6.1 - Liver Functions/Cystitis and Pyelonephritis

First post by Wednesday
Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments
Assignment 6.1 - Case Study

Sunday

Assessments
Quiz 6.1

Sunday

Week 7: Nervous System Disorders 

Readings
Chapter 14

Sunday

Discussions
Discussion 7.1 - Pathophysiology and Effects

First post by Wednesday
Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments
Assignment 7.1 - Case Study

Sunday

Week 8: Eye, Ear and Endocrine Disorders 

Readings
Chapters 15, 16 & 22

Sunday

Discussions
Discussion 8.1 - Thyroid/Otitis Media

First post by Wednesday
Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments
Assignment 8.1 - Case Study
Research Paper

Sunday

Assessments
Quiz 8.1

Sunday

Week 9: Musculoskeletal and Skin Disorders 

Readings
Chapters 8 & 9

Sunday

Discussions
Discussion 9.1 - Skin Functions/Contagious Skin Disorders

First post by Wednesday
Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments
Assignment 9.1 - Case Study

Sunday

Assessments
Quiz 9.1

Sunday

Week 10: Reproductive System Disorders 

Readings
Chapters 19

Sunday

Discussions
Discussion 10.1 - Testosterone/Uterine Wall

First post by Wednesday
Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments
Assignment 10.1 - Case Study

Sunday

Week 11 

Assessments
Final Exam

Thursday

 

 

Grading Criteria

Assignment

Weight

 Discussions

20%

 Case studies

 20%

 Research Paper

 10%

 Quizzes

 10%

 Midterm Exam

 20%

 Final Exam

20%

 TOTAL

100%

 

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy 
All assignments are due Sunday each week. Each student will be allowed two late assignments. The request to submit a late assignment must be received by the instructor no later than 12:00pm, Eastern on Monday after the week closes. The late assignment(s) will be due by Thursday, 11:55pm, Eastern and five points per day will be deducted. Any subsequent late assignment (assignment three forward) will be scored as a zero if not completed by Sunday each week. This policy only applies to assignments. Quizzes, exams and discussions are not eligible for late submissions.

Assignment Descriptions

Discussions 
Participation in the weekly discussions is required. You are required to answer one weekly question and respond to two (2) of your peers’ answers. The response must be scholarly, informative, and include how it applies to what the class is studying. The response must have a reference. When responding to your peers, you must include the same information. The textbook is a great starting point, but is not considered scholarly, therefore, it is not a valid reference.

Case Studies 
Each week, you are graded on your responses to one of the case studies from your textbook. Case studies will not be provided.

Research Paper 
You are to write a scholarly paper, due in Week 8. You are to email the instructor during Week 1 to state what disease you would like to research. After reviewing the information, you write a paper outlining the pathophysiology of the disease process, including the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, current treatments including medications, and expected outcomes. The care of the patient must include three (3) scholarly references cited throughout your paper. You must write your paper in the approved APA format, 12 point font, double spaced, minimum of four pages. References must be utilized properly.

Quizzes 
Quizzes are based on information from the textbook, case studies, and all materials presented.

Exams 
Midterm Exam - The midterm exam is a comprehensive exam based on information from the textbook, case studies, and all materials presented. It covers information from Weeks 1-5.

Final Exam - The final exam is a comprehensive exam based on information from the textbook, case studies, and all material presented. It covers information from Weeks 6-10.

Grade Explanation

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking, show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area, highly developed communication and presentation skills. Work is of outstanding quality.

B
Good
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category. Work is of very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects of the subject matter. Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or creative thinking. Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.

F
Failing
0-59%

Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements, shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills. Work is of unacceptable quality.

 

 

HIM131 - CPT Coding I

Sullivan University
College of Allied Health
Health Information Management
Course Syllabus
HIM131 CPT Coding I 
Credit Hours: 4


Course Description: The focus of this class is learning the coding rules for the CPT coding systems and then applying the rules to code patient services. In addition, students will become proficient in the use of the Current Procedural Terminology manual. Students will be able to assign the correct CPT code to any surgical and/or diagnostic procedure with the application of the correct CPT and/or HCPCS modifier.

Course Prerequisites: HIM101 and BIO103

Required Text(s) and Resources:

·        Green, M. (2016). 3-2-1 Code It! 7th Edition. ISBN: 9781337902809

·        Workbook: Green, M. (2016). Workbook for 3-2-1 Code It! 7th Edition. ISBN: 9781337902816

·        CPT Professional Edition 2019, AMA. ISBN: 9781622027521

·        Download the current Alpha-Numeric HCPCS File, Table of Drugs, and Alpha-Numeric Index from the CMS Website: https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Coding/HCPCSReleaseCodeSets/Alpha-Numeric-HCPCS.html

 

Course Outcomes: 

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

·        Identify the symbols used in the CPT manual

·        List the major sections found in the CPT manual

·        Interpret information in section guidelines and notes

·        Apply modifiers

·        State the purpose and contents of a special report

·        Locate terms in the CPT index

·        Identify content of CPT appendices

Assessment of Outcomes

·        Written assignments

·        Examinations

·        Class discussions

Grading System

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W


Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF


Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF


Failing - not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

Course Schedule

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is made available Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at midnight, on Sunday, January 17.

Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.

Assignments

Due

View Dates

Week 1: Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS)

Read 
Chapter 7 of textbook

Sunday

Discussion 1.1 - HCPCS Code Update

Initial post due Wednesday,
response posts due Sunday

Drop Box 1.1

Sunday

Quiz 1.1

Sunday

Week 2: Introduction to CPT Coding

Read
Chapter 8 Introduction to CPT Coding, Introduction-CPT Sections, Subsections, Categories and Subcategories

Sunday

Discussion 2.1 - Diagnostics and Surgical Procedures

Initial post due Wednesday,
response posts due Sunday

Drop Box 2.1
Drop Box 2.2

Sunday

Quiz 2.1

Sunday

Week 3: CPT Modifiers

Read

·        Textbook - Chapter 8, CPT Coding System, CPT Modifiers

·        CPT Code book, Appendix A

Sunday

Discussion 3.1 - Modifier 59 Usage

Initial post due Wednesday,
response posts due Sunday

Drop Box 3.1
Drop Box 3.2

Sunday

Quiz 3.1

Sunday

Week 4: Anesthesia Coding and Modifier Usage

Read
Chapter 10 of textbook, CPT Anesthesia
CPT Code book, Anesthesia Guidelines

Sunday

Discussion 4.1 - Anesthesia Coding

Initial post due Wednesday,
response posts due Sunday

Drop Box 4.1
Drop Box 4.2

Sunday

Quiz 4.1

Sunday

Week 5: Evaluation and Management (E/M): Outpatient, Consultation, and Emergency Room Coding

Read

·        Textbook - Chapter 9, CPT Evaluation and Management, Introduction - Office or Other Outpatient 
Services and Consultations and Emergency Department Services

·        CPT Code book, Evaluation and Management Guidelines

Sunday

Discussion 5.1 - Evaluation and Management

Initial post due Wednesday,
response posts due Sunday

Drop Box 5.1
Drop Box 5.2

Sunday

Midterm Exam

Thursday

Week 6: Surgery Coding

Read
Chapter 11 of textbook
CPT Code book, Integumentary subsection guidelines and procedures

Sunday

Discussion 6.1 - Integumentary Surgery Coding

Initial post due Wednesday,
response posts due Sunday

Drop Box 6.1
Drop Box 6.2

Sunday

Quiz 6.1

Sunday

Week 7: Musculoskeletal System Coding

Read

·        Textbook - Chapter 12 CPT Surgery II, Musculoskeletal System Subsection

·        CPT Code book, Musculoskeletal subsection guidelines and procedures

Sunday

Discussion 7.1 - Treatment for Fractures

Initial post due Wednesday,
response posts due Sunday

Drop Box 7.1
Drop Box 7.2

Sunday

Quiz 7.1

Sunday

Week 8: Respiratory Surgery Coding

Read

·        Textbook - Chapter 12 - CPT Surgery II, Respiratory System Subsection

·        CPT Code book, Respiratory subsection guidelines and procedures

Sunday

Discussion 8.1 - Lung Transplants

Initial post due Wednesday,
response posts due Sunday

Drop Box 8.1
Drop Box 8.2

Sunday

Quiz 8.1

Sunday

Week 9: Cardiovascular Surgery Coding

Read

·        Textbook - Chapter 13 - CPT Surgery III, Cardiovascular System Subsection

·        CPT Code book, Cardiovascular subsection guidelines and procedures

Sunday

Discussion 9.1 - Women and Heart Disease

Initial post due Wednesday,
response posts due Sunday

Drop Box 9.1
Drop Box 9.2

Sunday

Quiz 9.1

Sunday

Week 10: Hemic and Lymphatic Systems Coding

Read

·        Textbook - Chapter 13 - CPT Surgery III, Hemic and Lymphatic Systems Subsection

·        CPT Code book, Hemic and Lymphatic Systems, Mediastinum and Diaphragm subsection guidelines
and procedures

Sunday

Discussion 10.1 - Stem Cell Research

Initial post due Wednesday,
response posts due Sunday

Drop Box 10.1
Drop Box 10.2

Sunday

Quiz 10.1
Practice Exam

Sunday

Week 11: Final Exam

Discussion 11.1 - Course Reflections

Thursday

Final Exam

Thursday

 

 

Grading Criteria

Assignment

Weight

Discussions

10%

Drop Box Assignments

40%

Quizzes

10%

Midterm Exam

20%

Final Exam

20%

Total

100%

 

 

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy
All assignments are due Sunday each week.  Each student will be allowed two late assignments.  The request to submit a late assignment must be received by the instructor no later than 12:00pm, Eastern on Monday after the week closes.  The late assignment(s) will be due by Thursday, 11:55pm, Eastern and five points per day will be deducted.  Any subsequent late assignment (assignment three forward) will be scored as a zero if not completed by Sunday each week. This policy only applies to assignments.  Quizzes, exams and discussions are not eligible for late submissions.

If you experience technical difficulties in the online LMS that may result in a late assignment, you must immediately contact the 24/7 Online Support Center (toll free) at 1-888-720-6684 and try to resolve the issue. The Online Support Center keeps track of all support calls made by students. 

Discussions: Your initial post is due Wednesday and at least two responses your peers are due Sunday. This is a post first discussion. You cannot see any other students post until you have posted your initial post. A response of “I agree” or “Good post” is not acceptable. See the discussion rubric for additional discussion guidelines. The textbook is a great starting point, but is not a valid reference for this course. The codebook is a valid reference.

Grade Explanation

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking, show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area, highly developed communication and presentation skills. Work is of outstanding quality.

B
Good
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category. Work is of very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects of the subject matter. Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or creative thinking. Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.

F
Failing
0-59%

Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements, shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills. Work is of unacceptable quality.

 

 

 

 

HIM142 - ICD-10-CM Coding I

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Health Information Management
Course Syllabus
HIM142 - ICD-10-CM Coding I 
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This course focuses on the processes for clinical coding. Students learn to accurately code clinical data using ICD-10-CM.

Course Prerequisite: None

Required Text(s) and Resources

Green, Michelle, 3-2-1 Code It! 7th Edition, Text, Delmar, ISBN: 9781337902809

Green, Michelle, 3-2-1 Code It! Workbook, 7th Edition. Delmar, ISBN: 9781337902816

ICD-10-CM 2019 The Complete Official Codebook ISBN: 9781622027736

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

·         Explain ICD-10-CM coding guidelines

·         Accurately assign ICD-10-CM codes for:

o    External Causes codes and Z codes

o    signs and symptoms for inpatient hospital charts

o    Pregnancies

o    infectious diseases

o    mental disorders

o    circulatory disorders

o    Neoplasms

Assessment of Outcomes:
Weekly coding assignments, case studies, quizzes, weekly discussion posts, midterm coding exam, final coding exam  

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W


Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF


Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF


Failing - not actively engaged

 

 

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

Course Schedule

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is made available Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at midnight on Sunday, January 17.

Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.

NOTE: Textbook and Workbook Drop Box Assignment Instructions. Complete all assignments by creating a Word document and submitting it to the appropriate drop box. Label each exercise and questions. IF the instructions state "underline a term", you may either type the question in the Word document and underline the term, or use the following format:

Exercise 1.1
1. Main term:
Code: 
Assignments will receive a zero grade if the exercises are not labeled and numbered as described above.

Assignments

Due
View Dates

Week 1: Introduction to Medical Coding 

Read
Textbook Chapter 1 - Coding Overview

Sunday

Discussion 1.1 - Introduction

Initial post due by Wednesday
Follow-up posts due by Sunday

Practice Exercises

 

Dropbox 1.1
Dropbox 1.2

Sunday

Quiz 1.1

Sunday

Week 2: Introduction to ICD-10-CM Coding 

Read
Textbook Chapter 2 - Introduction to ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS Coding

Sunday

Discussion 2.1 - Ethical Coding

Initial post due by Wednesday
Follow-up posts due by Sunday

Dropbox 2.1
Dropbox 2.2

Sunday

Quiz 2.1

Sunday

Week 3: Coding Conventions and Guidelines 

Read
Textbook Chapter 3
Codebook: ICD-10-CM Coding Conventions and General Coding Guidelines

Sunday

Discussion 3.1 - ICD-10-CM Primary Sources

Initial post due by Wednesday
Follow-up posts due by Sunday

Dropbox 3.1
Dropbox 3.2

Sunday

Quiz 3.1

Sunday

Week 4: Z Codes and External Cause Codes 

Read

·         Textbook: Chapter 4 – ICD-10-CM Coding Guidelines – ICD-10-CM Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting and ICD-10-CM Chapter 19 - 21

·         Codebook: ICD-10-CM Guideline Chapters 19 - 21

Sunday

Discussion 4.1 - Z codes and pregnancies

Initial post due by Wednesday
Follow-up posts due by Sunday

Dropbox 4.1
Dropbox 4.2

Sunday

Quiz 4.1

Sunday

Week 5: Coding Infectious, Metabolic, and Nervous System Diseases 

Read

·         Textbook: Chapter 4 – ICD-10-CM Coding Guidelines – ICD-10-CM Chapters 1, 3, 4 and 6

·         Codebook: ICD-10-CM Guideline Chapters 1, 3, 4, and

Sunday

Discussion 5.1 - Combination and Multiple Codes

Initial post due by Wednesday
Follow-up posts due by Sunday

Dropbox 5.1
Dropbox 5.2

Sunday

Midterm Exam covering weeks 1-4

Thursday

Week 6: Coding Pregnancies 

Read

·         Textbook: Chapter 4 – ICD-10-CM Coding Guidelines – ICD-10-CM Chapter 9

·         Codebook: ICD-10-CM Guidelines Chapter 15

Sunday

Discussion 6.1 - Pregnancy Scenario

Initial post due by Wednesday
Follow-up posts due by Sunday

Dropbox 6.1
Dropbox 6.2

Sunday

Quiz 6.1

Sunday

Week 7: Coding Various Disorders 

Read

·         Textbook: Chapter 4 – ICD-10-CM Coding Guidelines – ICD-10-CM Chapter 5 and Chapters 10-14

·         Codebook: ICD-10-CM Guidelines Chapters 5, and 10 - 14

Sunday

Discussion 7.1 - Chronic versus Acute

Initial post due by Wednesday
Follow-up posts due by Sunday

Dropbox 7.1
Dropbox 7.2

Sunday

Quiz 7.1

Sunday

Week 8: Coding Diseases of the Circulatory System 

Read

·         Textbook Chapter 4 – ICD-10-CM Guidelines – ICD-10-CM Chapter 9

·         Codebook: ICD-10-CM Guideline Chapter 9 

·         View this video on the circulatory system (6:34)

Sunday

Discussion 8.1 - Emergency versus Urgency

Initial post due by Wednesday
Follow-up posts due by Sunday

Dropbox 8.1
Dropbox 8.2

Sunday

Quiz 8.1

Sunday

Week 9: Coding Neoplasms 

Read

·         Textbook Chapter 4 -ICD-10-CM Guidelines – ICD-10-CM Chapter 2

·         Codebook: ICD-10-CM Guideline Chapter 2

Sunday

Discussion 9.1 - Malignant versus Benign

Initial post due by Wednesday
Follow-up posts due by Sunday

Dropbox 9.1
Dropbox 9.2

Sunday

Quiz 9.1

Sunday

Week 10: Coding Signs & Symptoms 

Read

·         Textbook, Chapter 4 – ICD-10-CM Guidelines – ICD-10-CM Chapter 18

·         Codebook: ICD-10-CM Guideline Chapter 1

Sunday

Discussion 10.1 - Coding Signs and Symptoms

Initial post due by Wednesday
Follow-up posts due by Sunday

Dropbox 10.1
Dropbox 10.2

Sunday

Quiz 10.1

Sunday

Week 11: Finals Week 

Discussion 11.1 - Accurate Codding

Thursday

Final Exam - Covers all course materials

Thursday

 

 

Grading Criteria

Assignment

Weight

Discussions

10%

Drop Box Assignments          

40%

Quizzes

10%

Midterm

20%

Final Exam

20%

Total

100%

 


Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy
All assignments are due Sunday each week.  Each student will be allowed two late assignments.  The request to submit a late assignment must be received by the instructor no later than 12:00pm, Eastern on Monday after the week closes.  The late assignment(s) will be due by Thursday, 11:55pm, Eastern and five points per day will be deducted.  Any subsequent late assignment (assignment three forward) will be scored as a zero if not completed by Sunday each week. This policy only applies to assignments.  Quizzes, exams and discussions are not eligible for late submissions.            

Assignment Descriptions

Discussions
Weekly discussions are designed to engage critical thinking regarding the readings and provide a forum to interact with other students. Your initial discussion post is due Wednesday, with meaningful responses to at least two peers by Sunday. The textbook is a great starting point, but is not a valid reference for this course. The codebook is a valid reference.

Quizzes
Quizzes are given to ensure the textbook and article material is being understood.

Assignments
Weekly assignments include exercises from the textbook and applying codes to particular situations.           

Grade Explanation

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking, show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area, highly developed communication and presentation skills. Work is of outstanding quality.

B
Good
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category. Work is of very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects of the subject matter. Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or creative thinking. Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.

F
Failing
0-59%

Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements, shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills. Work is of unacceptable quality.

 

 

HIM151X - Healthcare Reimbursement

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Health Information Management
Course Syllabus
HIM151X - Healthcare Reimbursement
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This course provides the students with information about various healthcare reimbursement programs, health insurance plans and the role of health information technologists. Students apply their knowledge of ICD-10-CM, ICD-10-PCS and CPT coding to the various healthcare reimbursement programs. 

Course Prerequisites: None

Required Text(s) and Resources: Casto, A.& Forrestal, E. (2013). Principles of Healthcare Reimbursement. 6th Ed. Chicago, IL: AHIMA.
ISBN: 9781584266464

Available through EBSCOhost ebooks. Please click the following link to access: 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=667499&site=ehost-live&user=s8864281&password=password

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

·         Analyze and use current third-party payer guidelines for reimbursement

·         Apply managed care policies and procedures

·         Apply third-party payer guidelines• Complete insurance claim forms

·         Maintain records for accounting and banking purposes

·         Use manual and computerized bookkeeping systems

·         Establish and maintain the financial records

·         Identify and respond to issues of confidentiality

·         Respond to and initiate written communications

·         Establish and implement office and insurance collection strategies

HIM Associate Degree Entry Level Competencies

This course will focus on the following AHIMA competencies:

IV.A.1 – Apply policies and procedures for the use of data required in healthcare reimbursement.

IV.B.2 – Evaluate the revenue cycle management processes.

Assessment of Outcomes: 

Student learning will be assessed by the following methods:

·         Class discussions

·         Written assignments

·         Weekly examinations

·         Mid-term and final exams

Grading System:

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W


Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF


Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF


Failing - not actively engaged

 

 

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Note: Questions used in tests, exams and Test Your Knowledge assignments are copyright protected by AHIMA. Copyright ©2012 by the American Health Information Management Association. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, recording or otherwise without prior permission from the publisher.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

 

Course Schedule

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is made available Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at midnight, on Sunday, January 17.

Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.

Assignments

Due

View Dates

Week 1: Healthcare Reimbursement Methodologies 

·         Read chapter 1, the lecture, and view the
associated PowerPoints.  Answer the "Check
Your Understanding 1.1" questions as well as
the "Cheapter 1 Review Quiz" for review.

Sunday

·         Homework Assignment 1.1 - Test Your Knowledge

·         Homework Assignment 1.2 - Definitions of Terms

·         Homework Assignment 1.3 - Real World Case

Sunday

·         Discussion 1.1 - Federal Trade Commission Website

First post due
Wednesday by 11:55 p.m.,
replies due Sunday by 
11:55 p.m.

·          Assessment 2.1 - Week 2 Exam

Sunday 

 Week 3: Voluntary Healthcare Insurance Plans 

·         Read chapter 3, the lecture, and view the 
associated PowerPoints.  Answer questions in
"Check Your Understanding 3.1" and "Check 
Your Understanding 3.2". Also, answer the 
questions of the "Chapter 3 Review Quiz" for
review.

Sunday 

·         Homework Assignment 3.1 - Test Your Knowledge

·         Homework Assignment 3.2 - Definitions of Terms

·         Homework Assignment 3.3 - CMS-1500 for Darlene 
Watson

 Sunday

·          Discussion 3.1 - Breach of Confidentiality?

First post due
Wednesday by 11:55 p.m.,
replies due Sunday by
11:55 p.m. 

·          Assessment 3.1 - Week 3 Exam

Sunday 

 Week 4: Government-Sponsored Healthcare Program 

·         Read chapter 4, the lecture, and view the
associated PowerPoints.  Answer questions in
"Check Your Understanding 4.1" and "Check
Your Understanding 4.2".  Also, answer the 
questions in the "Chapter 4 Review Quiz" for 
review. 

Sunday 

·         Homework Assignment 4.1 - Test Your Knowledge

·         Homework Assignment 4.2 - Definitions of Terms

·         Homework Assignment 4.3 - Ledger Card for Donnie
Watson

Sunday 

·         Discussion 4.1 - Government Sponsored Health
Programs

First post due
Wednesday by 11:55 p.m.,
replies due Sunday by
11:55 p.m. 

·          Assessment 4.1 - Week 4 Exam

Sunday 

 Week 5: Managed Care Plans 

·         Read chapter 5, the lecture, and view the 
associated PowerPoints.  Answer questions in 
"Check Your Understanding 5.1" and "Check 
Your Understanding 5.2".  In addition, answer 
the questions in the "Chapter 5 Review Quiz"
for review.

Sunday 

·         Continue to work on Homework Assignment 9.3 - 
CMS Research Paper (due week 9)

·         Homework Assignment 5.1 - Test Your Knowledge

·         Homework Assignment 5.2 - Definitions of Terms

Sunday 

·          Discussion 5.1 - Continuum of Care

First post due
Wednesday by 11:55 p.m.,
replies due Sunday by
11:55 p.m. 

·          Assessment 5.1 - Mid-Term Exam (Weeks 1-5)

Thursday 

Week 6: Medicare-Medicaid Prospective Payment Systems 
for Inpatients 

·         Read chapter 6, the lecture, and view the 
associated PowerPoints.  Answer questions in
"Check Your Understanding 6.1" and "Check
Your Understanding 6.2".  In addition, answer
the questions in the "Chapter 6 Review Quiz"
for review. 

 Sunday

·         Homework Assignment 6.1 - Test Your Knowledge

·         Homework Assignment 6.2 - Definitions of Terms

·         Homework Assignment 6.3 - Ledger Card for 
Darlene Watson

Sunday 

·          Discussion 6.1 - Prospective Payment Systems

First post due
Wednesday by 11:55 p.m.,
replies due Sunday by
11:55 p.m.   

·          Assessment 6.1 - Week 6 Exam

Sunday 

Week 7: Ambulatory and Other Medicare-Medicaid Reimbursement 
Systems 

·         Read chapter 7, the lecture, and view the
associated PowerPoints.  Answer questions in
"Check Your Understanding 7.1" and "Check
Your Understanding 7.2".  In addition, answer
the questions in the "Chapter 7 Review Quiz"
for review.

Sunday 

·         Homework Assignment 7.1 - Test Your Knowledge

·         Homework Assignment 7.2

·         Homework Assignment 7.3 - UB-04 Assignment for
Donnie Watson 

Sunday 

·         Discussion 7.1 - Your HIM Career 

First post due
Wednesday by 11:55 p.m.,
replies due Sunday by
11:55 p.m.   

·         Assessment 7.1 - Week 7 Exam 

Sunday 

Week 8: Medicare-Medicaid Prospective Payment Systems for 
Post-Acute Care  

·         Read chapter 8, the lecture, and view the
associated PowerPoints.  Answer questions in
"Check Your Understanding 8.1" and "Check
Your Understanding 8.2".  In addition, answer
the questions in the "Chapter 8 Review Quiz"
for review. 

Sunday 

·         Continue work on Homework Assignment 9.3 - 
CMS Research Paper (due next week)

·         Homework Assignment 8.1 - Test Your Knowledge

·         Homework Assignment 8.2 - Theory into Practice

·         Homework Assignment 8.3 - UB-04 for Darlene
Watson

Sunday 

·          Discussion 8.1 - Workers' Compensation

First post due
Wednesday by 11:55 p.m.,
replies due Sunday by
11:55 p.m.   

·         Assessment 8.1 - Week 8 Exam 

Sunday 

Week 9: Revenue Cycle Management  

·         Read Chapter 9 and answer questions in
"Check Your Understanding 9.1" and "Check
Your Understanding 9.2" as well as the
"Chapter 9 Review Quiz" for review. 

Sunday 

·         Homework Assignment 9.1 - Application Exercise

·         Homework Assignment 9.2 - Theory into Practice

·         Homework Assignment 9.3 - Application Exercise

Sunday 

·         Discussion 9.1 - Breach in HIPAA Regulations 

First post due
Wednesday by 11:55 p.m.,
replies due Sunday by
11:55 p.m.   

·         Assessment 9.1 - Week 9 Exam 

Sunday 

Week 10: Value-Based Purchasing  

·         Read Chapter 10 and answer questions in
"Check Your Understanding 10.1" and "Check
Your Understanding 10.2" as well as the
"Chapter 10 Review Quiz" for review. 

Sunday 

·         Homework Assignment 10.1 - Test Your Knowledge

·         Homework Assignment 10.2 - Definitions of Terms

·         Homework Assignment 10.3 - Real World Case

·         Homework Assignment 10.4 - CMS Research Page 

Sunday 

·         Discussion 10.1 - Article Discussion 

First post due
Wednesday by 11:55 p.m.,
replies due Sunday by
11:55 p.m.   

·         Assessment 10.1 - Week 10 Exam 

Sunday 

Week 11: Finals Week  

·         Assessment 11.1 - Final Exam 

Thursday 

·         Discussion 11.1 - Moving Forward 

Thursday 

 

 

Grading Criteria

Assignment

Weight

Assignments

30%

Discussions

25%

Weekly Exams

10%

CMS Research Paper

10%

Mid Term and Final Exams

25%

Total

100%

 

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the term.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy
All assignments are due Sunday each week. Each student will be allowed two late assignments. The request to submit a late assignment must be received by the instructor no later than 12:00pm, Eastern on Monday after the week closes. The late assignment(s) will be due by Thursday, 11:55pm, Eastern and five points per day will be deducted. Any subsequent late assignment (assignment three forward) will be scored as a zero if not completed by Sunday each week. This policy only applies to assignments. Quizzes, exams and discussions are not eligible for late submissions.  

Assignment Descriptions
Assignments - Most weeks feature two assignments. The first is usually a check on learning, based on the readings, lectures, and PowerPoints. The second is usually an assignment to produce a medical coding document or to answer questions based upon a scenario.

Discussions - Weekly discussions are designed to engage critical thinking regarding the readings and provide a forum to interact with other students. Your initial discussion post is due Wednesday, with meaningful responses to at least two peers by Sunday. The textbook is a great starting point, but is not scholarly, therefore, it is not a valid reference for this course.

Written Assignments are an opportunity for you to apply knowledge and skills. Each written assignment requires independent reflection and analysis of the concepts. All written work must follow APA style which provides a way to acknowledge others’ ideas in your written work. Follow the APA link in Course Material. You will be graded on the originality of your paper.

Weekly Exams - Each week (excepting weeks 5 and 11), you take an exam that measures your mastery of the learning content for that week. Note: Questions used in tests, exams and Test Your Knowledge assignments are copyright protected by AHIMA. Copyright ©2012 by the American Health Information Management Association. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, recording or otherwise without prior permission from the publisher.

CMS Research Paper -Using your textbook and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services website, explain how the appeals process works when disputing a claim. Make sure these sources are cited at the end of the paper using APA style. (See APA Style at Sullivan University).

Discuss two ways the Center of Medicare and Medicaid Website is beneficial for the public, and two ways it might be confusing to the public.

Paper should be approximately 500 words, typed, double spaced, using APA style. Spelling, grammar, and punctuation count.

Compliance Plan - The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Inspector General (OIG) has established requirements for Compliance Programs for different entities identified on the OIG’s website http://oig.hhs.gov/compliance/compliance-guidance/index.asp.

The purpose of this assignment is to evaluate the differences between the seven components of an effective compliance program outline by OIG for Hospitals and Individual and Small Group Physicians Practices using the current documents in effect for Hospitals and Individual and Small Group Physicians Practices provided by OIG at http://oig.hhs.gov/compliance/compliance-guidance/index.asp. After reading the requirements for both entities select one component of an effective compliance program from either entity and explain your strategy to ensure your department is in compliance.

The paper will be a minimum of 2 pages and no more than 3 pages NOT including the cover or reference pages. Standard APA formatting applies.

Mid-Term Exam - In week 5, you take the mid-term exam over chapters 1-5.

Final Exam - In week 11, you take the comprehensive final-exam over chapters 1-10.

HIM161 - Legal Aspects of Health Information

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Course Syllabus
HIM161: Legal Aspects of Health Information
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description:

This course begins with an introduction to legislative and regulatory processes, legal terminology, health information laws and regulations. It continues with the examination of the HIPAA Security Rule, the evaluation of patients’ rights regarding the authorized and non-authorized release of personal health information (PHI) and legal terminology. It also reviews risk management, organization compliance and the release of PHI. The course continues with an evaluation of security threats and security protection of a Health Information Management organization. Last, the course evaluates professional and ethical workplace behavior and workplace laws of medical staff and medical facilities.

 

Course Prerequisite: 

None

 

Required Text(s) and Resources:

Brodnik, M. S., Rinehart-Thompson, L. A., & and Reynolds, R. B. (2017). Fundamentals of Law for Health Infomatics and Information Management, 3rd ed. Chicago: AHIMA.

 

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of HIM 161, students should be able to:

·         Utilize healthcare legal terminology

·         Identify the use of legal documents

·         Apply legal concepts and principles to HIM practice

·         Discuss retention and destruction policies for health information

·         Identify potential abuse or fraudulent trends through data analysis

·         Evaluate policies and procedures to ensure organizational compliance with regulations and standards

·         Prepare the organization for accreditation, licensure, and/or certification through collaboration with staff

·         Describe legal and regulatory requirements related to health information management

·         Apply ethical standards of practice

·         Describe the consequences of a breach of healthcare ethics

·         Assess a complete health record according to organizational policies, external regulations and standards

 

HIM Associate Degree Entry Level Competencies

This course will focus on the following AHIMA competencies:

·         I.B.3 - Identify a complete health record according to, organizational policies, external regulations and standards

·         II.A.1 - Apply healthcare legal terminology

·         II.A.2 - Identify the use of legal documents

·         II.A.3 - Apply legal concepts and principles to the practice of HIM

·         II.B.2 - Apply retention and destruction policies for health information

·         V.C.1 - Identify potential abuse or fraudulent trends through data analysis

·         V.A.1 - Analyze policies and procedures to ensure organizational compliance with regulations and standards

·         V.A.2 - Collaborate with staff in preparing the organization for accreditation, licensure, and/or certification

·         V.A.3 - Adhere to the legal and regulatory requirements related to health information management

·         VI.H.1 - Comply with ethical standards of practice

·         VI.H.2 - Evaluate the consequences of a breach of healthcare ethics

 

Assessment of Outcomes: 
 

Assignments, discussions, case studies, quizzes, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

 

Grading System:

This course requires a "C" (70%) or better in order to pass the course.

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged


For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation: 

Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:

Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities:

Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information:

None

Course Schedule

Assignments

Due
View Dates 
 

 

Week 1 - Ethics

 

 

Readings:
Chapters 1 - 4
PowerPoints, Chapters 1 - 4

  Sunday

 

Discussion 1.1 - Introduction
Discussion 1.2 - Case Study 1.1

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday

 

Assignment 1.1 - Disclosing Error to a Patient - Case Study 1.2

Sunday

 

Assessment 1.1 - Quiz 1

Sunday

 

Week 2 - Evidence of Tort Law 

 

 

Readings:
Chapters 5 - 6
PowerPoints, Chapters 5 - 6

  Sunday

 

Discussion 2.1 – Discoverability and Admissibility

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday

 

Assignment 2.1 – Case Study 2.1 – Scenario 5
Assignment 2.2 – Case Study 2.2 – Scenario 6

 Sunday

 

Assessment 2.1 - Quiz 2

Sunday

 

Week 3 - Corporations, Contracts and Anti-trust Legal Issues/Consent to Treat 
 

 

 

Readings:
Chapters 7 - 8
PowerPoints, Chapters 7 - 8

  Sunday

 

Discussion 3.1 – Consent to Treat Case Involving Minors

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday

 

Assignment 3.1 - Scenario Chapter 7
Assignment 3.2 - Scenario Chapter 8

 Sunday

 

Assessment 3.1 - Quiz 3

Sunday

 

Week 4 - The Legal Health Record and HIPAA Privacy Part I

 

 

Readings:
Chapters 9 - 10
PowerPoints, Chapters 9 - 10

Sunday  

 

Discussion 4.1 -  Validating the Record

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday

 

Assignment 4.1 - Medical Record Review Exercise
Assignment 4.2 – Identification, Retention and Disposition of Medical Records

 Sunday

 

Assessment 4.1 - Quiz 4

Sunday

 

Week 5 - HIPAA Privacy Rule Part II and Security Rule

 

 

Readings:
Chapters 11 - 12
PowerPoints, Chapters 11 - 12

  Sunday

 

Discussion 5.1 – Distinguish Between Privacy in Health Care and Confidentiality

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday  

 

Assignment 5.1 – HIPAA Case Discussion 
Assignment 5.2 - AHIMA Website

 Sunday

 

Assessment 5.1 - Midterm Exam

Thursday

 

Week 6 - Security Threats and Controls 
 

 

 

Readings:
Chapter 13
PowerPoint, Chapter 13

Sunday  

 

Discussion 6.1 – Case Study 6.1

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday  

 

Assignment 6.1 – Chapter 13 Scenario

Sunday

 

Assessment 6.1 - Quiz 6

Sunday

 

Week 7 - Patient Rights and Responsibilities and Ownership of the Medical Record

 

 

Readings:
Chapters 14 - 15
PowerPoints, Chapters 14 - 15

Sunday  

 

Discussion 7.1 – Darcy 
Discussion 7.2 –  Huping Zhou

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday  

 

Assignment 7.1 – Patient Rights Case Study
Assignment 7.2 – Sensitive Information Evaluation

 Sunday

 

Assessment 7.1 - Quiz 7

Sunday

 

Week 8 - Reporting Disclosures: RM, QI and Patient Safety

 

 

Readings:
Chapters 16 - 17
PowerPoints, Chapters 16 - 17 

  Sunday

 

Discussion 8.1 -  Web Search
Discussion 8.2 - Charlotte Prince

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday  

 

Assignment 8.1 – Comparison of Sample Risk Management Plans

 Sunday

 

Assessment 8.1 - Quiz 8

Sunday

 

Week 9 - Corporate Compliance and Medical Staff

 

 

Readings:
Chapters 18 - 19
PowerPoints, Chapters 18 - 19 

  Sunday

 

Discussion 9.1 – Ethics Scenario

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday

 

Assignment 9.1 – Registration Employee
Assignment 9.2 – Medical Staff Privilege Review 
Assignment 9.3 – New Director of Health Information Management

 Sunday

 

Assessment 9.1 - Quiz 9

Sunday

 

Week 10 -Workplace Law

 

 

Readings:
Chapter 20
PowerPoint, Chapter 20

Sunday  

 

Discussion 10.1 - Workplace Ethics

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday  

 

Assignment 10.1 – New Hire
Assignment 10.2 – Labor Law Summary
Assignment 10.3 - Corporate Compliance Project

Sunday

 

Assessment 10.1 - Quiz 10

Sunday

 

Week 11 - Finals Week

 

 

Discussion 11.1 - Wrapping It Up

Thursday

 

Assessment 11.1- Final Exam

Thursday

 
 

Assessment of Outcomes

Grading Criteria

Assignment

Weight

 

 Discussions
 

10% 

 

 Assignments

35% 

 

 Quizzes

15% 

 

Exams and Project
 

40% 

 

Total

100%

 
 

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy
All assignments are due Sunday each week. Each student will be allowed two late assignments. The request to submit a late assignment must be received by the instructor no later than 12:00pm, Eastern on Monday after the week closes. The late assignment(s) will be due by Thursday, 11:55pm, Eastern and five points per day will be deducted. Any subsequent late assignment (assignment three forward) will be scored as a zero if not completed by Sunday each week. This policy only applies to assignments. Quizzes, exams and discussions are not eligible for late submissions. 
 

Assignment Descriptions

Discussion Forums

Each week, you are presented with one or more discussions questions related to the week's topic. You are expected to respond to the initial questions by Wednesday of that week, then provide meaningful comments to at least two other students' posts and to comments on your initial post by Sunday. The discussions are a means for class participation and help hone your analytical and communication skills. Initial discussion post require at least one scholarly reference in APA format. The textbook is a great starting point, but is not scholarly, therefore, it is not a valid reference for this course.

Note: All posts and replies must be original work, not copied/pasted from another source. Copying other students' posting and resubmitting them as your own is cheating an is treated as such.

Written Assignments

The written assignments require answers to questions selected to evaluate your understanding of the key concepts covered in each of the weekly reading assignments. The answer length should not be shorter than 2 -3 paragraphs and no longer than a page and a half unless otherwise instructed in the assignment. The assignment should be in you own words and referenced per APA. 

   

Quizzes

Quizzes will consist of 10 questions and a 30 minute time limit. As you have only one attempt to complete the quiz, be sure you allot enough time to complete the quiz before you begin.

Midterm Exam

The Midterm  exam consists of 75 questions from Weeks 1 - 5  content. You have 2 hours to complete the exam. You only have one attempt so be sure you have allotted enough time to complete the exam before you start. Question formats may include multiple choice, matching, true/false, multiple select (select all that apply), and fill-in-the-blank.        

 

Final Exam

The final exam is a comprehensive exam (Weeks 1 - 10) that consists of 100 questions. You have 2 hours to complete the exam. You only have one attempt so be sure you have allotted enough time to complete the exam before you start. Question formats may include multiple choice, matching, true/false, multiple select (select all that apply), and fill-in-the-blank.

Grade Explanation

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking, show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area, highly developed communication and presentation skills. Work is of outstanding quality.

B
Good
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category. Work is of very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects of the subject matter. Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or creative thinking. Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.

F
Failing
0-59%

Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements, shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills. Work is of unacceptable quality.

 

HIM170 - Performance Improvement

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Health Information Management
Course Syllabus
HIM170 - Performance Improvement
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This course provides education on quality assessment and performance improvement in regards to health care information. Topics include utilization management, risk management, case management, regulatory quality monitoring requirements and outcomes measures and monitoring.

Course Prerequisite: None

Required Text(s) and Resources: Shaw, P., Elliott, C. (2019). Quality and performance improvement in healthcare: Theory, practice and management (7th ed). Chicago: American Health Information Management Association. ISBN: 9781584266631.

Sayles, N. and Gordon, L. (2016), Health information management technology: an applied approach (5th edition). Chicago, IL: AHIMA Press. ISBN: 978-1-58426-517-7.

Spath, P. (2013). Health care quality management student workbook (4th edition). Forest Grove, OR: Brown-Spath & Associates. ISBN: 978-1-929955-47-3.

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

·         Discuss the principles of quality improvement (QI)/quality management (QM), utilization management (UM) and risk management (RM) in health care

·         Identify and apply appropriate tools used to display QI/QM data

·         Analyze QI/QM data to assess clinical outcomes

·         Describe the functions of committees related to hospital performance improvement (PI) and medical staff peer review programs

·         Discuss the importance and interactions of regulatory agencies in QI/QM programs

·         Discuss the importance of the role of Risk Management in the QI/QM program

HIM Associate Degree Entry Level Competencies

This course will focus on the following AHIMA competencies:

III.C.1 – Explain analytics and decision support.

III.D. 2 – Analyze data to identify trends

III.H.1 – Apply policies and procedures to ensure the accuracy and integrity of health data both internal and external to the health system.

VI.A.1 – Summarize health information related leadership roles.

VI.A.2 – Apply the fundamentals of team leadership.

VI.A.3 - Organize and facilitate meetings.

VI.C.1 – Utilize tools and techniques to monitor, report, and improve processes.

VI.C.2 – Identify cost-saving and efficient means of achieving work processes and goals.

VI.C.3 – Utilize data for facility-wide outcomes reporting for quality management and performance.

VI.I.1 – Summarize project management methodologies.

Assessment of Outcomes:  Discussions, Written assignments, midterm exam, final exam

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100%

Excellent

B

80-89%

Above Average

C

70-79%

Average

D

60-69%

Below Average

F

0-59%

Failing

W


Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF


Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF


Failing - not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

Course Schedule

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is made available Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at midnight, on Sunday, January 17.

Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.Assignments DueView Dates
 

Assignments

Due
View Dates

Week 1: Introduction to Health Care Quality Management - Part 1

Read AHIMA textbook, Chapters 1 and 2

Sunday

Discussion 1.1 - Introductions
Discussion 1.2 - Personal Experience of High Quality Health Care
Discussion 1.3 - Internet Research of health Care Quality Definition

Initial post due by Wednesday, 
follow up posts due by Sunday

Assignment 1.1 - Contribution of Information Technology to Healthcare Performance
Assignment 1.2 - Hospital Quality Management Structure
Assignment 1.3 - Quality Improvement and Healthcare Reforms

Sunday

Week 2: Introduction to Health Care Quality Management - Part 2

Read AHIMA textbook, Chapter 15

Sunday

Discussion 2.1 - Personal Experience of Inferior Quality Health Care

Initial post due by Wednesday, 
follow up posts due by Sunday

Assignment 2.1 - Elements of a Successful Quality Management Effort
Assignment 2.2 - Factors that Inhibit Improvements in Healthcare
Assignment 2.3 - Quality Improvement and Healthcare Reforms
Assignment 2.4 - Case Study Questions

Sunday

Week 3: Tools of the Trade - Part 1

Read
AHIMA textbook, Chapter 3

 

Discussion 3.1 - Measures of Performance for Inferior Health Care

Initial post due by Wednesday, 
follow up posts due by Sunday

Assignment 3.1 - Process and Outcome Measures
Assignment 3.2 - Measure Customer Satisfaction with an Important HIM Process
Assignment 3.3 - Healthcare Reform

Sunday

Week 4: Tools of the Trade - Part 2

Read
AHIMA textbook, Chapter 5

Sunday

Access the Excel tutorial and work through the lessons to master the basic concepts of Excel.

Sunday

Discussion 4.1 - Accuracy and Validity of Health Care Data

Initial post due by Wednesday, 
follow up posts due by Sunday

Assignment 4.1 - Create a Survey Instrument
Assignment 4.2 - Query an Online Data Source to Measure Performance
Assignment 4.3 - Create and Interpret a Line Graph
Assignment 4.4 - Select Data Presentation Formats

Sunday

Week 5: Getting Results - Part 1

Read Sayles textbook, Chapter 13

Sunday

Discussion 5.1 - Sampling Methodology

Initial post due by Wednesday, 
follow up posts due by Sunday

Assignment 5.1 - Cycle Time Data Collection Tool
Assignment 5.2 - Measuring Compliance
Assignment 5.3 - Measurement Sampling Techniques

Initial post due by Wednesday, 
follow up posts due by Sunday

Midterm Exam

Thursday

Week 6: Getting Results - Part 2

Read AHIMA textbook, Chapter 17

Sunday

Discussion 6.1 - HIPAA Responsibilities to Protect Patient Privacy

Initial post due by Wednesday, 
follow up posts due by Sunday

Assignment 6.1 - Core Measure Comparison
Assignment 6.2 - Case Study

Sunday

Week 7: Evaluating Measurement Results

Read Sayles textbook, Chapter 12

Sunday

Discussion 7.1 - Importance of Assessing Healthcare Data

Initial post due by Wednesday, 
follow up posts due by Sunday

Assignment 7.1 - Create and Interpret a Bar Graph
Assignment 7.2 - Create and Interpret a Control Chart
Assignment 7.3 - Create a Corporate Report of Hospital Performance
Assignment 7.4 - Conduct a Root Analysis of a Sentinel Event

Sunday

Final Project - Begin work on Final Project

Thursday, Week 11

Week 8: Communicating Measurement Results

Read AHIMA textbook, Chapter 6

Sunday

Discussion 8.1 - Elements of Effective Communication

Initial post due by Wednesday, 
follow up posts due by Sunday 

Assignment 8.1 - Meeting Minutes Project
Assignment 8.2 - Storyboard Exercise
Assignment 8.3 - Case Study

Sunday

Week 9: The Performance Improvement Model

Read
AHIMA textbook, Chapters 18, 19 and 4

Sunday

Discussion 9.1 - Project Team Development

Initial post due by Wednesday, 
follow up posts due by Sunday 

Assignment 9.1 - Charter a Performance Improvement Project
Assignment 9.2 - Plan a Rapid Cycle Improvement Project
Assignment 9.3 - Measure the Effectiveness of an Improvement Project
Assignment 9.4 - Case Study

Sunday

Week 10: Putting It All Together

Read
Project Management in Healthcare: Past, Present and Future
Project Management Manual
AHIMA textbook, Chapter 21

Sunday

Discussion 10.1 - Legal Issues
Discussion 10.2 - Career Self Assessment Survey and Discussion

Initial post due by Wednesday, 
follow up posts due by Sunday 

Assignment 10.1 - Performance Improvement Project

Sunday

Week 11: Finals Week

Discussion 11.1 - Challenges for the Health Information management Professional

Wednesday

Final Project Due

Thursday

 

 

Grading Criteria

Assignment

Weight

Discussions

20%

Written Assignments/Assessments     

50%

Midterm Exam

15%

Final Project

15%

Total

100%

 

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy
All assignments are due Sunday each week.  Each student will be allowed two late assignments.  The request to submit a late assignment must be received by the instructor no later than 12:00pm, Eastern on Monday after the week closes.  The late assignment(s) will be due by Thursday, 11:55pm, Eastern and five points per day will be deducted.  Any subsequent late assignment (assignment three forward) will be scored as a zero if not completed by Sunday each week. This policy only applies to assignments.  Quizzes, exams and discussions are not eligible for late submissions.

Assignment Descriptions

Discussions
Each week, you are presented with one or more discussions questions related to the week's topic. You are expected to respond to the initial questions by Wednesday of that week, then provide meaningful comments to at least two other students' posts and to comments on your initial post by Sunday. The discussions are a means for class participation and help hone your analytical and communication skills. Initial discussion post require at least one scholarly reference in APA format. The textbook is a great starting point, but is not scholarly, therefore, it is not a valid reference for this course.

Note: All posts and replies must be original work, not copied/pasted from another source. Copying other students' posting and resubmitting them as your own is cheating an is treated as such.

Written Assignments
Weekly assignments include exercises from the Spath workbook and other written assignments. textbook and applying codes to particular situations.

Exams/Projects
Exams/Projects are given to ensure the course concepts are being understood.

Assignment Cycle
All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week's work is made available Friday at 5:00 p.m. and will remain available for ten days. The weekly assignments, including lab exercises, and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5:00 p.m. on Friday the completed assignments will be due at midnight on Sunday. Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.  

All work must be submitted by the due date and time to qualify for the total points available. A penalty may be applied for late submissions.

Grade Explanation

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking, show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area, highly developed communication and presentation skills. Work is of outstanding quality.

B
Good
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category. Work is of very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects of the subject matter. Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or creative thinking. Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.

F
Failing
0-59%

Final Project - Begin work on Final Project  Thursday, Week 11Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements, shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills. Work is of unacceptable quality.

 

 

HIM231 - CPT Coding II

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Health Information Management
Course Syllabus
HIM231 CPT Coding II
Credit Hours:  4

Course Description: The focus of this class is to continue learning the coding rules for the CPT coding system and then applying the rules to code patient services. In addition, students will become proficient in the use of the Current Procedural Terminology manual. Students will be able to assign the correct CPT codes to any surgical and/or diagnostic procedure with the application of the correct CPT and/or HCPCS modifier.

Course Prerequisite: HIM101, BIO103, HIM131

Required Text(s) and Resources:

·        Green, M. (2016). 3-2-1 Code It! 7th Edition. ISBN: 9781337902809

·        Workbook: Green, M. (2016). Workbook for 3-2-1 Code It! 7th Edition. ISBN: 9781337902816

·        CPT Professional Edition 2019, AMA. ISBN: 9781622027521

·        Download the current Alpha-Numeric HCPCS File, Table of Drugs, and Alpha-Numeric Index from the CMS Website: 
https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Coding/HCPCSReleaseCodeSets/Alpha-Numeric-HCPCS.html

 

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

·        List the major sections found in the CPT manual

·        Interpret information in section guidelines and notes

·        Apply modifiers

·        State the purpose and contents of a special report

·        Locate terms in the CPT index

·        Identify content of CPT appendices

HIM Associate Degree Entry Level Competencies

This course will focus on the following AHIMA competencies:

I.A.2 - Evaluate the accuracy of diagnostic and procedural coding.

I.A.4 - Evaluate the accuracy of diagnostic and procedural coding.
 

Assessment of Outcomes: This course uses class discussions, written assignments, examinations, and analyses of case studies to assess outcomes.
 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

Course Schedule

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is madeavailable Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and
discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on
Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at midnight, on Sunday, January 17.

Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.

Assignments

Due
View Dates 

Week 1: Evaluation and Management: Hospital Observation Services,
Hospital Inpatient Services, Critical Care Services, Nursing Facility,
Domiciliary, Rest Home or Custodial Care Services

 

Read: Textbook Chapter 9 - CPT Evaluation and Management - Hospital Observation Services - Hospital Inpatient Services and Critical Care Services - Remainder of Chapter 9

Sunday

Drop Box 1.1
Drop Box 1.2

Sunday

Discussion 1.1 - Key Components in the Evaluations and Management Code
Section 

Initial post due Wednesday 11:55 p.m./Responses due Sunday 11:55 p.m.

Quiz 1.1 – E/M Coding 

Sunday 

Week 2:  NCCI Edits

 

Read: Chapter 8 - Introduction to CPT Coding - NCCI

Chapter 1 of the NCCI Policy Manual
How to Use NCCI Tools
Modifier - 59 Flowchart article 

Sunday 

Drop Box 2.1
Drop Box 2.2

Sunday 

Discussion 2.1 - NCCI Edits

Initial post due Wednesday 11:55 p.m./Responses due Sunday 11:55 p.m.  

Week 3:  Physician Fee Schedule

 

Read:  Textbook - Chapter 19 - Insurance and Reimbursement Overview - Introduction - Types of Third Party Payers and Impact of HIPAA on Reimbursement
Read the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule fact sheet from the US Department of Health and Human Services.  Read and study all associated Physician Fee Schedule documents.

Sunday 

Drop Box 3.1
Drop Box 3.2 

Sunday 

Week 4:  Digestive Surgery and Mediastinum and Diaphragm Surgery Coding

 

Read:  Textbook: Chapter 14 - CPT Surgery IV - Mediastinum and Diaphragm and Subsection - Digestive System Subsection
Codebook:  Digestive, Mediastinum and Diaphragm Subsection Guidelines and Procedures 

Sunday 

Drop Box 4.1
Drop Box 4.2 

Sunday 

Discussion 4.1 - Digestve Surgery Coding 

Initial post due Wednesday 11:55 p.m./Responses due Sunday 11:55 p.m.  

Quiz 4.1

Sunday

Week 5:  Urinary and Genital Systems and Midterm Exam

 

Read:  Textbook Chapter 14 - CPT Surgery IV - Urinary System Subsection and Chapter 15 - CPT Surgery V - Urinary System Subsection and Chapter 15 - CPT Surgery V - Male Genital System Subsection - Maternity Care and Delivery Subsection
Codebook:  Urinary System, Male and Female Genital Systems Subsection Guidelines and Procedures 

Sunday 

Drop Box 5.1
Drop Box 5.2 

Sunday 

Discussion 5.1 - Urinary and Genital System 

Initial post due Wednesday 11:55 p.m./Responses due Sunday 11:55 p.m.  

Midterm Exam

Thursday

Week 6:  Endocrine, Nervous System, Eye, and Auditory Systems

 

Read:  Textbook: Chapter 15 - CPT Surgery V - Endocrine System Subsection - Auditory System Subsection Codebook: Endocrine, Nervous System, Eye and Ocular Adenexa and Auditory Systems Subsections Guidelines and Procedures 

Sunday

Drop Box 6.1
Drop Box 6.2 

Sunday 

Discussion 6.1 - Nervous System 

Initial post due Wednesday 11:55 p.m./Responses due Sunday 11:55 p.m.  

Quiz 6.1

Sunday

Week 7:  Medicine Coding

 

Read:  Textbook Chapter 18 - CPT Medicine
Codebook: Medicine Guidelines 

Sunday 

Drop Box 7.1
Drop Box 7.2 

Sunday 

Discussion 7.1 - Modalities 

Initial post due Wednesday 11:55 p.m./Responses due Sunday 11:55 p.m.  

Quiz 7.1

Sunday

Week 8:  Radiology Coding

 

Read:  Textbook Chapter 16 - Radiology Coding
Codebook:  Radiology Guidelines and Procedures 

Sunday 

Drop Box 8.1
Drop Box 8.2 

Sunday 

Discussion 8.1 - Radiology Coding 

Initial post due Wednesday 11:55 p.m./Responses due Sunday 11:55 p.m.  

Quiz 8.1

Sunday

Week 9:  Categories II and III Coding

 

Read:  Textbook: None
Codebook:  Category II and III Guidelines 

Sunday 

Drop Box 9.1
Drop Box 9.2 

Sunday 

Discussion 9.1 - CPT Symbols 

Initial post due Wednesday 11:55 p.m./Responses due Sunday 11:55 p.m.  

Week 10:  Pathology and Laboratory Coding

 

Read:  Textbook Chapter 17 - CPT Pathology and Laboratory
Codebook: Pathology and Laboratory Guidelines 

Sunday 

Drop Box 10.1
Drop Box 10.2 

Sunday 

Discussion 10.1 - Pathology and Laboratory Subsections 

Initial post due Wednesday 11:55 p.m./Responses due Sunday 11:55 p.m.  

Quiz 10.1

Sunday

Week 11:  Final Examination

 

Discussion 11.1 - Wrapping it up
Final Examination covering Weeks 1-10 

 Thursday


Grading Criteria

Assignment

Weight

 Assignments

40% 

 Discussions 

10% 

 Quizzes 

20% 

 Examinations

30% 

 

 

 Total 

 100%

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy
All assignments are due Sunday each week. Each student will be allowed two late assignments. The request to submit a late assignment must be received by the instructor no later than 12:00pm, Eastern on Monday after the week closes. The late assignment(s) will be due by Thursday, 11:55pm, Eastern and five points per day will be deducted. Any subsequent late assignment (assignment three forward) will be scored as a zero if not completed by Sunday each week. This policy only applies to assignments. Quizzes, exams and discussions are not eligible for late submissions policy of this course that all assignments received after the due date do not receive any credit. Late assignments are not accepted.
 

Assignment Descriptions

Assignment and Reading Information 
All assignments, discussions, quizzes and examinations must be submitted by the due date and time to qualify for the total points available.   

Please refer to the course calendar. The specific dates that lessons open and close are posted. Post any questions regarding due dates to “Ask the Instructor” or send the instructor an email.  

In addition to your textbooks and CPT Code books, the lecture notes and all material within each week’s folder should be considered required reading. Questions for quizzes and exams come from the textbook, CPT code book, and weekly material. Depending on your individual circumstances, you can expect to spend 10 hours a week or more completing assignments, reading and studying. 

Discussions 
Weekly discussions are designed to engage critical thinking regarding the readings and provide a forum to interact with other students. Your initial discussion post is due Wednesday, with meaningful responses to at least two peers by Sunday. The textbook is a great starting point, but is not a valid reference for this course. The codebook is a valid reference.
 

Grading Explanation 

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking, show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area, highly developed communication and presentation skills. Work is of outstanding quality.

B
Above Average
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category. Work is of very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects of the subject matter. Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or creative thinking. Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.

F
Failing
0-59%

Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements, shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills. Work is of unacceptable quality.

 

HIM242 - ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Coding II

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Allied Health
Health Information Management
Course Syllabus
HIM242 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Coding II

Credits: 4

Course Description: This course provides instruction in the use of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification, ICD-10-CM. The students will learn how to code diagnoses using the electronic ICD-10-CM and the ICD-10-CM code book. They will also learn to use the ICD-10-CM Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting. Accurate code selection is the focus of the course.  Case studies provide practical experience coding for various medical specialties.  

Course Prerequisite: HIM142

Required Text(s) and Resources: ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS Coding Handbook without Answers, 2019 Edition, Leon-Chisen, ISBN: 9781556484414

ICD-10-CM 2019:  The Complete Official Codebook, ISBN: 9781622027736

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

·         Explain ICD-10-CM coding guidelines

·         Accurately assign ICD-10-CM codes for:

o    Injuries, and burns for inpatient hospital charts

o    Signs and symptoms for inpatient hospital charts

o    Pregnancies

o    Inpatient hospital procedures

o    Infectious diseases

o    Mental disorders

o    Circulatory disorders

o    Neoplasms 

HIM Associate Degree Entry Level Competencies

This course will focus on the following AHIMA competencies:

I.A.1 - Apply diagnosis/procedure codes according to current guidelines.

I.C.3 – Ensure accuracy of diagnostic/procedural groupings such as DRG, MSDRG, APC and so on.

I.C.6 – Use and maintain applications and processes to support other clinical classification and nomenclature systems.

I.D.6 – Ensure accuracy of diagnostic/procedural groupings such as DRG, MSDRG, APC and so on.

Assessment of Outcomes: Weekly coding assignments, weekly case studies, weekly quizzes, weekly discussion posts, midterm coding exam and case study, final coding exam and case study.

Grading System:

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog. It is also contained in the page titled Academic Integrity Policy within the Syllabus and Important Course Documents folder.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

 

Course Schedule

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is made available Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at midnight, on Sunday, January 17.

Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.

Assignments

Due

View Dates

Week 1: Introduction to ICD-10-CM

 

Read: Textbook: Chapters 1-3

 Sunday

Discussion 1.1 - Introduction

 First post due Wednesday

Responses due Sunday

Discussion 1.2 - ICD-10-CM Chapter Review

  First post due Wednesday

Responses due Sunday

Assignment 1.1 - ICD-10-CM

Quiz 1.1 

Sunday

Week 2: ICD-10-CM Basics

 

Read: Textbook: Chapter 5-7 and Chapter 12
ICD-10-CM Guidelines: Coding Conventions

 Sunday

Discussion 2.1 - Z Codes 

 First post due Wednesday

Responses due Sunday

Assignment 2.1 - ICD-10-CM

Quiz 2.1

Sunday

Week 3: Coding Signs and Symptoms

 

Read: Textbook: Chapter 13
ICD-10-CM: Chapter 18

 Sunday

Discussion 3.1 - Differences between Signs and Symptoms 

 First post due Wednesday

Responses due Sunday

Assignment 3.1 - Case Studies and Coding

Sunday

Quiz 3.1 - Coding Activity

Sunday

Week 4: Infectious and Endocrine Disease, and Mental Disorders

 

Read: Textbook: Chapters 14 - 16
ICD-10-CM Guidelines

 Sunday

Discussion 4.1 -  Abuse vs. Dependence  

  First post due Wednesday

Responses due Sunday

Assignment 4.1 - Case Studies and Coding

Assignment 4.2 – MSDRG/Encoder

Sunday

Quiz 4.1 - Coding Activity

Sunday

Week 5: Blood-forming Organs and Nervous Systems Diseases

 

Read: Textbook: Chapter 17 and 18
ICD-10-CM Guidelines

 Sunday

Discussion 5.1 - Pain

 First post due Wednesday

Responses due Sunday

Assignment 5.1 - Case Studies and Coding

Sunday

Midterm

Thursday

Week 6: Diseases of Respiratory System, Digestive System, and Genitourinary System

 

Read: Textbook: Chapters 19-21
ICD-10-CM Guidelines

 Sunday

Discussion 6.1 - COPD 

 First post due Wednesday

Responses due Sunday

Assignment 6.1 - Case Studies and Coding

Sunday

Quiz 6.1 - Coding Activity

Sunday

Week 7: Diseases of Skin and Musculoskeletal Systems

 

Read: Textbook: Chapters 22 and 23
ICD-10-CM Guidelines

 Sunday

Discussion 7.1 - Pathological vs. Traumatic Fractures

 

 

  First post due Wednesday

Responses due Sunday

Assignment 7.1 - Case Studies and Coding

Assignment 7.2 - Physician Query

Sunday

Quiz 7.1 - Coding Activity

Sunday

Week 8: Complications of Pregnancies

 

Read: Textbook: Chapters 24-27
ICD-10-CM Guidelines

Sunday

Discussion 8.1 - Postpartum Complications and Late Effects of Pregnancy/Childbirth

  First post due Wednesday

Responses due Sunday

Assignment 8.1 - Case Studies and Coding

Assignment 8.2 – SNOMED CT

Sunday

Quiz 8.1 - Coding Activity

Sunday

Week 9: Circulatory System Diseases and Neoplasms

 

Read: Textbook: Chapters 28 and 29
ICD-10-CM Guidelines

 Sunday

Discussion 9.1 - Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease

  First post due Wednesday

Responses due Sunday

Assignment 9.1 - Case Studies and Coding

Sunday

Quiz 9.1 - Coding Activity

Sunday

Week 10: Injuries, Burns, Poisoning, and Complications of Surgery and Medical Care

 

Read: Textbook: Chapters 30 - 33
ICD-10-CM Guidelines 

 Sunday

Discussion 10.1 - To Code or Not to Code a Condition 

  First post due Wednesday

Responses due Sunday

Assignment 10.1 - Case Studies and Coding
Assignment 10.2 - Coding Audit

Sunday

Practice Exam - Coding Activity (ungraded - can be done at any time that week)

Any day

Week 11: Why ICD-10-CM Coding Guidelines Are Important and Finals Week

 

Discussion 11.1 - Reflections

Wednesday 

Final Exam

Thursday

 

 

Grading Criteria

Assignment

Weight

Discussions 

10%

Quizzes

20%

Case Studies

25%

Midterm Exam

20%

Final Exam

25%

 

 

 

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy
All assignments are due Sunday each week.  Each student will be allowed two late assignments.  The request to submit a late assignment must be received by the instructor no later than 12:00pm, Eastern on Monday after the week closes.  The late assignment(s) will be due by Thursday, 11:55pm, Eastern and five points per day will be deducted.  Any subsequent late assignment (assignment three forward) will be scored as a zero if not completed by Sunday each week. This policy only applies to assignments.  Quizzes, exams and discussions are not eligible for late submissions.

Assignment Descriptions

Practice Coding Exercises
Several weeks provide practice coding activities based upon a case study scenario. These activities require you to use the coding manual and to determine the principal diagnosis code, secondary codes, and procedure codes. These activites are not graded but you are encouraged to complete them for practice. All activities provide feedback. Please note that these interactive exercises do require you to use an alphanumeric convention (entering codes in alphanumeric order) that is NOT required in tests in this course and is not common practice in the field. It is a convention required just for these exercises.

Discussion Forums 
Weekly discussions are designed to engage critical thinking regarding the readings and provide a forum to interact with other students. Your initial discussion post is due Wednesday, with meaningful responses to at least two peers by Sunday. The textbook is a great starting point, but is not a valid reference for this course. The codebook is a valid reference.

Quizzes
Weekly quizzes include coding questions, identifying the correct code for a provided diagnosis.  They ensure the textbook and article material are being read and understood.

Case Studies
Case Studies are given to ensure theyou are able to apply the material from textbook and the lectures. In many weeks there are severalungraded practice case studies as described above. These appear on the Lesson page and can be completed as often as you like. 

Each week there is also a graded assignment that includes case studies and coding questions for that week's clinical area. These use fill-in-the-blank and multiple select formats to identify principal, secondary, and procedure codes. Given that the exams also include coding case studies, these assignments provide you with lots of practice using the coding manual and applying the tips and hints provided both within the weekly instruction and within your text. Take advantage of this practice!

Exams
A mid-term exam and final exam are given to ensure you are making progress in your coding ability. This course includes a Midterm (Week 5) and Final exam (Week 11), as well as an ungraded practice exam in Week 10. While case studies focus on coding all relevant codes, exams focus on the principal diagnosis. Accurate coding is a must in the field and exam grading uses case sensitivity, so ensure you are aware of and use upper and lower case to enter codes exactly as they are found in the coding manual. Points are lost to inaccurate codes.

 

Grading Explanation

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking, show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area, highly developed communication and presentation skills. Work is of outstanding quality.

B
Good
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category. Work is of very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects of the subject matter. Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or creative thinking. Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.

F
Failing
0-59%

Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements, shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills. Work is of unacceptable quality.

 

 

HIM250X - Healthcare Statistics

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Health Information Management
Course Syllabus
HIM250X - Healthcare Statistics
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This course instructs students on using statistical software to analyze data for quality, utilization and risk management. Other topics include study of the institutional review board process, national guidelines regarding research, techniques for data reporting and analyzing descriptive and vital statistics.

Course Prerequisite: MTH101

Required Text(s) and Resources: Darche, L. and Koch, G. (2020). Basic allied health statistics and analysis (5th ed.). Cengage. ISBN 9781337796965.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

·         Describe the purpose and use of hospital and health statistics

·         Perform statistical computations based on uniform definitions and methodology for health statistics 

·         Generate health information statistical reports used for medical and administrative purposes

·         Describe which health information statistical reports meet the requirements of government regulations and accrediting agencies

HIM Associate Degree Entry Level Competencies

This course will focus on the following AHIMA competencies:

I.D.2 – Apply graphical tools for data presentations.

I.E.1 – Identify and use secondary data presentations.

I.E.2 – Validate the reliability and use secondary data sources.

III.B.2 – Utilize health information to support enterprise wide decision support for strategic planning.

III.C.2 – Apply report generation technologies to facilitate decision-making.

III.D.1 – Utilize basic descriptive, institutional, and healthcare statistics

.III.F.1 – Explain common research methodologies and why they are used in healthcare.

Assessment of Outcomes:

Discussions, assessments, statistics project

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog. It is also contained in the page titled Academic Integrity Policy within the Syllabus and Important Course Documents folder.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Course Schedule

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is made available Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at 11:55 p.m., on Sunday, January 17.

Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.

Assignments

Due

View Dates

Week 1: Statistical Terminology and Health Care Data

 

Readings

·         Koch, Chapter 1

·         Koch, Chapter 1 PowerPoint

·         Behavioral Health Trends in the United States: Results from the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health

 

Sunday

Discussions

·         Discussion 1.1 - Getting to Know You

·         Discussion 1.2 - Data Collection

First post by Wednesday

Responses to peers by Sunday

Assessments

·         Assessment 1.1 - Koch Chapter 1 Review Exercise

·         Assessment 1.2 - Koch Chapter 1 Test

Sunday

Week 2: Health Care Overview and Patient Data Collection

 

Readings

·         Koch, Chapter 3

·         Koch, Chapter 3 PowerPoint

Sunday

Discussions

·         Discussion 2.1 - Patient Care by Facility Type

First post by Wednesday

Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments

·         Assignment 2.1 - Self-tests from Koch Chapter 3 (Ungraded)

Sunday

Assessments

·         Assessment 2.1 - Koch Chapter 3 Review Exercise

·         Assessment 2.2 - Koch Chapter 3 Test

Sunday

Week 3: Mathematical Review

 

Readings

·         Koch, Chapter 2

·         Koch, Chapter 2 PowerPoint

Sunday

Discussions

·         Discussion 3.1 - Importance of Rounding

First post by Wednesday

Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments

·         Assignment 3.1 - Self-tests from Koch Chapter 2 (Ungraded)

Sunday

Assessments

·         Assessment 3.1 - Koch Chapter 2 Review Exercise

·         Assessment 3.2 - Koch Chapter 2 Test

Sunday

Week 4: Frequency Distributions & Tables, Measures of Central Tendency & Dispersion Objectives

 

Readings

·         Koch, Chapters 11 and 12

·         Koch, Chapter 11 PowerPoint

·         Koch, Chapter 12 PowerPoint

Sunday

Discussions

·         Discussion 4.1 - Why Group Data?

First post by Wednesday

Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments

·         Assignment 4.1 - Self-tests from Koch Chapters 11 and 12 (Ungraded)

Sunday

Assessments

·         Assessment 4.1 - Koch Chapter 11 and 12 Review Exercise

·         Assessment 4.2 - Koch Chapter 11 and 12 Test

Sunday

Week 5: Community Health Statistics

 

Readings

·         Koch, Chapter 10

·         Koch, Chapter 10 PowerPoint

·         National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, NCHS Fact Sheet

Sunday

Discussions

·         Discussion 5.1 - Uses of Vital Statistics

First post by Wednesday

Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments

·         Assignment 5.1 - Self-tests from Koch Chapter 10 (Ungraded)

Sunday

Assessments

·         Assessment 5.1 - Koch Chapter 10 Review Exercise

·         Assessment 5.2 - Koch Chapter 10 Test

Sunday

•&νβσπ;&νβσπ;&νβσπ;&νβσπ;&νβσπ;&νβσπ; Assessment 5.3 – Mid-Term Exam

Thursday

Week 6: Hospital Census, Occupancy and Length of Stay

 

Readings

·         Koch, Chapters 4, 5, and 6

·         Koch, Chapter 4 PowerPoint

·         Koch, Chapter 5 PowerPoint

·         Koch, Chapter 6 PowerPoint

·         Length of Stay: Timing It Right

Sunday 

Discussions

·         Discussion 6.1 - Why Length of Stay Matters

First post by Wednesday

Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments

·         Assignment 6.1 - Self-tests from Koch Chapters 4, 5, and 6 (Ungraded)

Sunday

Healthcare Statistics Final Project

Sunday of Week 10

Assessments

·         Assessment 6.1 - Koch Chapters 4, 5, and 6 Review Exercise

·         Assessment 6.3 - Koch Chapters 4, 5, and 6 Test

Sunday

Week 7: Hospital Mortality Rates, Obstetrical Related Rates & Autopsy

 

Readings

·         Koch, Chapters 7, and 9

·         Chapter 7 PowerPoint

·         Chapter 9 PowerPoint

·         Deaths: Final Data for 2013. National Vital Statistics Report.

Sunday

Discussions

·         Discussion 7.1 - Mortality Rates

First post by Wednesday

Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments

·         Assignment 7.1 - Self-tests from Koch Chapters 7, and 9 (Ungraded)

Sunday

Assessments

·         Assessment 7.1 - Koch Chapters 7 and 9 Review Exercise

·         Assessment 7.2 - Koch Chapters 7 and 9 Test

Sunday

Week 8: Clinical and Nonclinical Statistics

 

Readings

·         Koch, Chapter 8

·         Koch, Chapter 8 PowerPoint

·         Medicare Non-Payment of Hospital-Acquired Infections: Infection Rates Three Years Post Implementation

Sunday

Discussions

·         Discussion 8.1 - Policy Impact

First post by Wednesday

Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments

·         Assignment 8.1 - Self-tests from Koch Chapter 8 (Ungraded)

Sunday

Assessments

·         Assessment 8.1 - Koch Chapter 8 Review Exercise

·         Assessment 8.2 - Koch Chapter 8 Test

Sunday

Week 9: Displaying Data for Analysis

 

Readings

·         Koch, Chapter 13

·         Koch, Chapter 13 PowerPoint

Sunday 

Discussions

·         Discussion 9.1 - Choosing Graphic Data Displays

First post by Wednesday

Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments

·         Assignment 9.1 - Self-tests from Koch Chapter 13 (Ungraded)

Sunday

Assessments

·         Assessment 9.1 - Koch Chapter 13 Review Exercise

·         Assessment 9.2 - Koch Chapter 13 Test

Sunday 

Week 10: Fundamentals of Research and Statistical Applications

 

Readings

·         Koch, Chapter 14

·         Koch, Chapter 14 PowerPoint

·         Behavioral Health Trends in the United States: Results from the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health

Sunday 

Discussions

·         Discussion 10.1 - AHIMA Research

First post by Wednesday

Responses to peers by Sunday

Assignments

·         Assignment 10.1- IRB Research

·         Assignment 10.2 - Health Care Statistics Final Project

Sunday 

Week 11: Finals Week

 

Discussions

·         Discussion 11.1 - Policy Impact

First post by Wednesday

Responses to peers by Thursday

Assessments

·         Assessment 11.1 - Final Exam

Thursday

Assessment of Outcomes

Assignment

Weight

Discussions, Review Exercises, Assignments

30%

Chapter Tests

30%

Midterm, Final Exam, and Final Project

40%

 Total 

 100%

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy
All assignments are due Sunday each week.  Each student will be allowed two late assignments.  The request to submit a late assignment must be received by the instructor no later than 12:00pm, Eastern on Monday after the week closes.  The late assignment(s) will be due by Thursday, 11:55pm, Eastern and five points per day will be deducted.  Any subsequent late assignment (assignment three forward) will be scored as a zero if not completed by Sunday each week. This policy only applies to assignments.  Quizzes, exams and discussions are not eligible for late submissions.

If you experience technical difficulties in the LMS that may result in a late assignment, you must immediately contact the 24/7 Online Support Center (toll free) at 1-888-720-6684 and try to resolve the issue. The Online Support Center keeps track of all support calls made by students.

Assignment Descriptions

Discussions
Weekly discussions are designed to engage critical thinking regarding the readings and provide a forum to interact with other students. Your initial discussion post is due Wednesday, with meaningful responses to at least two peers by Sunday. The textbook is a great starting point, but is not scholarly, therefore, it is not a valid reference for this course.

Review Exercises
For each chapter you have a review exercise, which is essentially a practice test that is meant as a formative evaluation. That means its purpose is to show you what you have yet to master, and allow you to address those deficiencies in your knowledge before you take the summative evaluation--the chapter test. You have 2 opportunities, with unlimited time, on each review exercise. Your higher score on the 2 attempts is recorded as your grade. A recommended strategy is to read and study all of the learning content, and then take the review exercise the first time to see how you fare. Next, go back to re-study the areas where you did not do well. Then re-take the review exercise to ensure you are ready for the chapter test.

Assignments
Most of the assignments in the course are ungraded self-tests that are in the textbook. You will not do well on the review exercises or chapter tests if you do not complete these self-tests. Any requirements for other assignments are explained in the lessons.

Chapter Tests
The chapter tests are summative evaluations designed to measure your mastery of the learning content. Each chapter test comprises 25 problems, and you have 1 hour and only 1 opportunity to complete the test. You receive a warning when 10 minutes remain, and the test automatically saves and closes when time expires.

Midterm and Final
The midterm comprises 75 questions drawn from the Koch Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 12 and 13 tests covered in Lessons 1-5. The final exam comprises 75 questions drawn from chapters 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 14. For each test, you have 180 minutes and only 1 attempt. You receive a warning when 10 minutes remain, and the test automatically saves and closes when time expires

Healthcare Statistics Final Project
Complete information about the Healthcare Statistics Final Project is under the Assignments page in week 6.

Grading Explanation

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking, show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area, highly developed communication and presentation skills. Work is of outstanding quality.

B
Above Average
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category. Work is of very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects of the subject matter. Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or creative thinking. Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.

F
Failing
0-59%

Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements, shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills. Work is of unacceptable quality.

 

HIM261 - Healthcare Management

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Health Information Management
Course Syllabus
HIM261 - Healthcare Management
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description

This course will engage in the functions of a manager, planning, organizing, decision making, staffing, leading or directing, communication and motivating. Further study will include principles of authority/ responsibility, delegation and effective communication, organization charts, job descriptions, policies and procedures, employee motivation, discipline and performance evaluation. 

Course Prerequisite

HIM161, HIM170, ENG102

Required Text(s) and Resources

Olden, P. C. (2015). Management of healthcare organizations: An introduction (2nd ed.). Chicago, IL: Health Administration Press. ISBN: 978-1-56793-690-2 

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

·         Identify the various types of management styles

·         Develop work plans, policies, procedures, and resource requisitions in relation to job functions

·         Prioritize the functions of an HIM department

·         Contribute to work team and committees

·         Observe staffing levels and productivity standards for health information functions

·         Provide feedback to work team regarding performance

·         Use quality improvement tools and techniques to monitor, report and improve processes

·         Examine items for budgetary oversight to maximize cost savings and workflow processes and goals

·         Demonstrate the importance of orientation, training, and continuing education in the workplace

HIM Associate Degree Entry Level Competencies

This course will focus on the following AHIMA competencies:

·         VI.A.1 – Summarize health information related leadership roles.

·         VI.B.1 – Recognize the impact of change management on processes, people and systems.

·         VI.D.1 – Report staffing levels and productivity standards for health information functions.

·         VI.D.2 – Interpret compliance with local, state, and federal labor regulations.

·         VI.D.3 – Adhere to work plans, policies, procedures, and resource requisitions in relation to job functions.

·         VI.E.1 – Explain the methodology of training and development.

·         VI.E.2 – Explain return on investment for employee training/development.

·         VI.G.1 – Plan budgets.

·         VI.G.2 – Explain budget variances.

·         VI.H.3 – Assess how cultural issues affect health, healthcare quality, cost and HIM.

·         VI.H.4 – Create procedures and policies that support a culture of diversity.

Assessment of Outcomes

Discussions, assignments, final project

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged


For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation 

Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity

Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities

Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information

None

Course Schedule

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is made available Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at midnight, on Sunday, January 17.

Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.

 

Assignments

Due
View Dates

Week 1 - Health, Healthcare and Healthcare Organizations

 

 Readings:

·         Chapter 1 from Management of Healthcare Organizations: An Introduction, 2nd edition

·         "Decisions, Decision" case (pp. 326-327)

Sunday 

  Discussion 1.1 - Future Trends

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday

  Assignment 1.1 - Making Decisions

 Sunday

  Quiz 1.1

Sunday

Week 2 - Management and Planning

 

 Readings:

·         Chapters 2 and 3

·         "Taking Care of Business at Graceland Memorial Hospital" case (pp. 334-335)

  Sunday

  Discussions:

·         Discussion 2.1 - Mintzberg’s Ten Managerial Roles

·         Discussion 2.2 - Managerial Roles

  Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday

 Assignments:

·         Assignment 2.1 - Case Analysis Paper

·         Assignment 2.2 - Staffing Levels and Productivity Standards

·         Assignment 2.3 - New HIM Department Budget 

Sunday 

  Quiz 2.1

Sunday

Week 3 - Organizing the HIM Organization

 

 Readings:

·         Chapters 4 and 5

·         Revisit the "Taking Care of Business at Graceland Memorial Hospital" case

·         "Case: Nowhere Job" (p.  333)

Sunday

  Discussion 3.1 - Organizing Work

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday  

  Assignments:

·         Assignment 3.1 - Case Study: Business at Graceland Memorial Hospital

·         Assignment 3.2 - Case Study: Nowhere Job

·         Assignment 3.3 - Chapter Review Questions

Sunday

  Quiz 3.1

Sunday

Week 4 - Organizing Groups and Teams

 

 Readings:

·         Chapter 6

·         Revisit the "Taking Care of Business at Graceland Memorial Hospital" case

Sunday

  Discussion 4.1 - Strategic Group Development

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday  

  Assignments:

·         Assignment 4.1 - Case Study: Business at Graceland Memorial Hospital

·         Assignment 4.2 - Chapter Review Questions

Sunday

  Quiz 4.1

Sunday

Week 5 - The Staffing Function

 

 Readings:

·         Chapters 7 and 8

·         "I Can't Do It All" case (p. 332)

Sunday

 Discussion 5.1 - Hiring and Retention Strategies

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday  

 Assignments:

·         Assignment 5.1 - Case Study: Recruiting 

·         Assignment 5.2 - Case Study: Encouraging Decision Making

·         Assignment 5.3 - Coder Education

·         Assignment 5.4 - Chapter Review Questions

Sunday

  Assessments:

·         Midterm Exam

Thursday

Week 6 - Leadership

 

 Readings:

·         Chapters 9, 10 and 11

·         Revisit the "I Can't Do It All" case 

Sunday

  Discussion 6.1 - Medical Ethics

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday

 Assignments:

·         Assignment 6.1 - Case Study: I Can't Do It All Leadership Theories

·         Assignment 6.2 - Case Study: I Can't Do It All Motivational Theories

·         Assignment 6.3 - Case Study: I Can't Do It All Organizational Culture

·         Assignment 6.4 - Chapter Review Questions 

·         Assignment 6.5 - Final Project

Sunday

  Quiz 6.1

Sunday

Week 7 - Performance Management

 

 Readings:

·         Chapter 12

Sunday

  Discussion 7.1 -  Managerial Control

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday  

 Assignments: 

·         Assignment 7.1 - Case Study: Decisions, Decisions

·         Assignment 7.2 - Chapter Review Questions

Sunday

  Quiz 7.1

Sunday

Week 8 - Problem Solving

 

 Readings:

·         Chapter 13

·         Revisit the "Decisions, Decisions" case  (pp. 326-327)

Sunday

  Discussion 8.1 - Conflict Resolution Styles

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday  

 Assignments:

·         Assignment 8.1 - Case Study: Decisions, Decisions

·         Assignment 8.2 - Chapter Review Question

Sunday

  Quiz 8.1

Sunday

Week 9 - Managing Change

 

 Readings: 

·         Chapter 14

·         Revisit the "Taking Care of Business at Graceland Memorial Hospital" case

Sunday

  Discussion 9.1 - Management Principles

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday  

  Assignments:

·         Assignment 9.1 - Case Study: Taking Care of Business at GMH

·         Assignment 9.2 - Chapter Review Questions  

Sunday

  Quiz 9.1

Sunday

Week 10 - Effective Communications

 

 Readings:

·         Chapter 15

·         Revisit the "I Can't Do It All" case 

Sunday

 

  Discussion 10.1 - Creating an Effective Communication Model

Initial post due Wednesday
Responses due Sunday 

 

  Assignments:

·         Assignment 10.1 - Case Study: I Can't Do It All

·         Assignment 10.2 - Final Project Due

·         Assignment 10.3 - Chapter Review Questions 

Sunday

  Quiz 10.1

Sunday

Week 11 - Finals Week

 

  Discussion 11.1 - Management Tools

 Wednesday

  Final Exam

Thursday


Assessment of Outcomes

Grading Criteria

Assignment

Weight

 Discussions

 10%

 Assignments

 40%

 Quizzes

 10%

 Midterm/Final Exam

  20%

 Final Project

 20%

 Total 

 100%

 

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

It is the policy of this course that all assignments received after the due date do not receive any credit. Late assignments are not accepted without written permission of the instructor.

If you experience technical difficulties in the LMS that may result in a late assignment, you must immediately contact the 24/7 Online Support Center (toll free) at 1-888-720-6684 and try to resolve the issue. The Online Support Center keeps track of all support calls made by students.

Assignment Descriptions

Discussions - Weekly discussions are designed to engage critical thinking regarding the readings and provide a forum to interact with other students. Your initial discussion post is due Wednesday, with meaningful responses to at least two peers by Sunday. The textbook is a great starting point, but is not scholarly, therefore, it is not a valid reference for this course.

Quizzes - Each week you are given a short quiz to help reinforce the concepts covered that week.

Exams - You are given a midterm and final which are cumulative over all material covered in class.  The exams are multiple choice and T/F questions. A set time frame is allocated for completion. See the instruction page for details.  Make sure you give yourself enough time to take the exams in entirety before beginning.

Final Project - See project instructions and guidelines under PROJECT on the left navigation bar beginning in Week 6.

Grading Explanation 

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking, show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area, highly developed communication and presentation skills. Work is of outstanding quality.

B
Above Average
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category. Work is of very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects of the subject matter. Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or creative thinking. Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.

F
Failing
0-59%

Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements, shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills. Work is of unacceptable quality.

 

HIM271 - ICD-10-PCS Coding

 SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Health Information Management
Course Syllabus
HIM271 ICD-10-PCS Coding
Credits: 4 hours

Course Description: This course provides instruction in the use of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Procedure Coding System, ICD-10-PCS. The students learn how to code procedures using the ICD-10-PCS coding system. They also learn to use the ICD-10-PCS Official Guidelines and practice assigning codes for general and multi-specialty procedures. 4 credit hours lecture, 1 credit hour lab

Course Prerequisite: HIM142 and HIM242 *May be taken concurrently with HIM242*

Required Text(s) and Resources: Kuehn, L., Jorwic, T. M. (2019). ICD-10: An applied approach. AHIMA Press. ISBN: 9781584266891

ICD-10-PCS 2019 The Complete Official Codebook, AMA, ISBN: 9781622027750

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

·         Discuss the background and design of the ICD-10-PCS Code Set

·         Identify the organization and structure of the ICD-10-PCS Code set

·         Identify the ICD-10-PCS coding guidelines

·         Define Root operations as designated in the ICD-10-PCS code set

·         Analyze surgical documentation to determine correct assignment of Root operations

·         Define surgical approaches as designated in the ICD-10-PCS code set

·         Select operative approaches to surgical documentation

·         Assign PCS codes utilizing the ICD-10-PCS Coding Steps

·         Assign ICD-10-PCS codes from various body systems

·         Evaluate selected codes for accuracy

Assessment of Outcomes

·         Written assignments

·         Examinations

·         Class discussions

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog. It is also contained in the page titled Academic Integrity Policy within the Syllabus and Important Course Documents folder.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

 

Course Schedule

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is made available Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at midnight, on Sunday, January 17.

Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.

 

Assignments

Due View Dates

 Week 1: Introduction to ICD-10-PCS Coding 

 Required Reading 
 Textbook chapters 1,2, and Appendix A
 Suggested Reading 
 Medical Coding: A Journey, chapter 20

 Sunday

 Discussion 1.1 - Introductions
 Discussion 1.2 - Advantages of ICD-10-PCS

 Initial post due by Wednesday, response post due by Sunday

 Assignment 1.1 - Exercises

 Sunday

 Quiz 1.1

 Sunday

 Week 2: Root Operations 

 Read chapters 3, 4, 5, and 6

 Sunday

 Discussion 2.1 - 7th Character

 Initial post due by Wednesday, response post due by Sunday

 Assignment 2.1 - Exercises

 Sunday

 Quiz 2.1

 Sunday

 Week 3: Root Operations and Anatomical Regions 

 Read chapters 7, 8, and 9

 Sunday

 Discussion 3.1 - Percutaneous vs. Percutaneous Endoscopic

 Initial post due by Wednesday, response post due by Sunday

 Assignment 3.1 - Exercises
 Assignment 3.2 - Case Studies

 Sunday

 Quiz 3.1

 Sunday

 Week 4: Respiratory, Circulatory, and Gastrointestinal and Hepatobiliary Systems  

 Read chapters 10, 11, and 12

 Sunday

 Discussion 4.1 - Lobectomy

 Initial post due by Wednesday, response post due by Sunday

 Assignment 4.1 - Exercises
 Assignment 4.2 - Case Studies

 Sunday

 Quiz 4.1

 Sunday

 Week 5: Endocrine and Lymphatic Systems, and Integumentary System  

 Read chapters 13 and 14

 Sunday

 Discussion 5.1 - Lymph System Disease

 Initial post due by Wednesday, response post due by Sunday

 Assignment 5.1 - Exercises
 Assignment 5.2 - Case Studies

 Sunday

 Midterm Exam

 Thursday

 Week 6: Muscular and Skeletal System  

 Read chapters 15 and 16

 Sunday

 Discussion 6.1 - Muscular System

 Initial post due by Wednesday, response post due by Sunday

 Assignment 6.1 - Exercises
 Assignment 6.2 - Case Studies

 Sunday

 Quiz 6.1

 Sunday

 Week 7: Urinary System and Male Reproductive System  

 Read chapters 17 and 18

 Sunday

 Discussion 7.1 - Male Reproductive System

 Initial post due by Wednesday, response post due by Sunday

 Assignment 7.1 - Exercises
 Assignment 7.2 - Case Studies

 Sunday

 Quiz 7.1

 Sunday

 Week 8: Female Reproductive System and Obstetrics  

 Read chapters 19 and 20

 Sunday

 Discussion 8.1 - Female Reproductive System

 Initial post due by Wednesday, response post due by Sunday

 Assignment 8.1 - Exercises
 Assignment 8.2 - Case Studies

 Sunday

 Quiz 8.1

 Sunday

 Week 9: Placement, Performance and Therapies, Osteopathic, and Other Procedures 

 Read chapters 21, 22, and 23

 Sunday

 Discussion 9.1 - Administration Substances

 Initial post due by Wednesday, response post due by Sunday

 Assignment 9.1 - Exercises
 Assignment 9.2 - Case Studies

 Sunday

 Quiz 9.1

 Sunday

 Week 10: Coding Radiation, Physical Rehabilitation, and Substance Abuse Treatments  

 Read chapters 24 and 25

 Sunday

 Discussion 10.1 - Mental Health Qualifiers

 Initial post due by Wednesday, response post due by Sunday

 Assignment 10.1 - Exercises
 Assignment 10.2 - Case Studies

 Sunday

 Quiz 10.1

 Sunday

 Week 11: Finals Week  

 Final Exam

 Thursday

 Discussion 11.1 - Final Reflections

 Thursday

 

Grading Criteria

Assignment

Weight

Discussions

10%

Exercises

15%

Case Studies

15%

PowerPoint Presentation

5%

Quizzes

20%

Midterm Exam

15%

Final Exam

20%

Total

100%

 

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy
All assignments are due Sunday each week. Each student will be allowed two late assignments. The request to submit a late assignment must be received by the instructor no later than 12:00pm, Eastern on Monday after the week closes. The late assignment(s) will be due by Thursday, 11:55pm, Eastern and five points per day will be deducted. Any subsequent late assignment (assignment three forward) will be scored as a zero if not completed by Sunday each week. This policy only applies to assignments. Quizzes, exams and discussions are not eligible for late submissions.

Discussions
Weekly discussions are designed to engage critical thinking regarding the readings and provide a forum to interact with other students. Your initial discussion post is due Wednesday, with meaningful responses to at least two peers by Sunday. The textbook is a great starting point, but is not scholarly, therefore, it is not a valid reference for this course. The codebook is an acceptable reference.

Grade Explanation

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking, show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area, highly developed communication and presentation skills.  Work is of outstanding quality.  

B
Good
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category. Work is of very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects of the subject matter. Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below
Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or creative thinking. Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.

F
Failing
0-59%

Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements, shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills. Work is of unacceptable quality.

 

 

HIM290X - Health Information Practicum

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Health Information Management
Course Syllabus
HIM290X - Health Information Practicum
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description
This course provides the students with the opportunity to practice their health information technology skills as they complete their professional practice experience (PPE) in local health care facilities. This experience allows the students to relate the functional and theoretical components of the curriculum to realistic practice situations.

Course Prerequisite
Course to be taken in last quarter

Required Text(s) and Resources:  McCuen, Cases In Health Information Management, 3rd ed., Cengage. 
ISBN: 9781305955332.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will:

·         Complete an in-person Practicum at an approved facility

·         Analyze case studies and provide solutions to case study questions.Implement training activities for compliance

·         Write a reflection on their practicum experience

Assessment of Outcomes:  

Discussions, Case Studies, Practicum Supervisor evaluation, and final reflection paper

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student’s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog. It is also contained in the page titled Academic Integrity Policy within the Syllabus and Important Course Documents folder.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

Course Schedule

All courses in the HIM Program have a ten-day assignment cycle. Each week’s work is made available Friday at 5 p.m. and remains available for ten days. The weekly assignments and discussions are due on the Sunday night of the week following the week they were made available, ten days later. For example, if the weekly assignments are made available at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 8, the completed assignments are due at 11:55 p.m., on Sunday, January 17.

Note these two exceptions: Week 1 when the week's work is open from the first day of the quarter at 8 a.m. to Sunday at 11:55 p.m. and the last week when the final exam is available from Monday at 8 a.m. until Thursday at 11:55 p.m. All times listed are EST/EDT.

Assignments

Due

Week 1: Introduction to the Practicum 

Discussion Forum 1.1 - Practicum Type

 Initial post due Wednesday/Responses
to peers due Sunday

Assignment 1.1 - Resume

 Sunday

Assignment 1.2 - Practicum Information

 Sunday

Week 2: Customer Service 

Discussion Forum 2.1 - Internal versus External Customer Service

Initial post due Wednesday/Responses
to peers due Sunday

Assignment 2.1 - Case 2-27 - Breach Notification

 Sunday

Assignment 2.2 - Providing Effective Internal Customer Service

 Sunday

Assignment 2.3 - Internal Customer Service

 Sunday

Week 3: Soft versus Hard Skills

Discussion Forum 3.1 - Soft versus Hard Skills

Initial post due Wednesday/Responses
to peers due Sunday

Assignment 3.1 - Behavior

 Sunday

Assignment 3.2 - Behavior Analysis

 Sunday

Assignment 3.3 - Writing Skills for Technical Professionals

 Sunday

Week 4: Data Content, Structure and Standards 

Discussion Forum 4.1 - Copy and Paste in the EHR

Initial post due Wednesday/Responses
to peers due Sunday

Assignment 4.1 - Case 1-21 - Face Validity of QI Study on Births

 Sunday

Assignment 4.2 - Case 1-26 - Clinical Vocabularies

 Sunday

Week 5: Information Protection: Access, Archival, Privacy and Security 

Discussion Forum 5.1 - Alteration of Patient Record

Initial post due Wednesday/Responses
to peers due Sunday

Assignment 5.1 - Case 2-8 - Processing a Request for Release of Information

 Sunday

Assignment 5.2 - Case 2-16 - Accounting for Disclosure of Protected Health Information under HIPAA

 Sunday

Assignment 5.3 - Case 2-43 - Patient Verification

 Sunday

Week 6: Informatics, Analytics and Data Use

Discussion Forum 6.1 - System Integration

Initial post due Wednesday/Responses
to peers due Sunday

Assignment 6.1 - Case 3-9 - System Life Cycle

 Sunday

Assignment 6.2 - Case 3-27 - Cloud Computing

 Sunday

Assignment 6.3 - Case 3-38 - Encoder Selection

 Sunday

Week 7: Revenue Management 

Discussion Forum 7.1 - Hierarchical Condition Categories

Initial post due Wednesday/Responses
to peers due Sunday

Assignment 7.1 - Case 4-19 - Monitoring Revenue

 Sunday

Assignment 7.2 - Case 4-20 - Utilization Review

 Sunday

Week 8: Compliance 

Discussion Forum 8.1 - MS-DRG Changes

Initial post due Wednesday/Responses
to peers due Sunday

Assignment 8.1 - Case 5-13 - Documentation Improvement

 Sunday

Assignment 8.2 - Caase 5-14 - Office of the Inspector General Findings

 Sunday

Week 9: Leadership 

Discussion 9.1 - Evaluating Employees' Skills

Initial post due Wednesday/Responses
to peers due Sunday

Assignment 9.1 - Case 6-9 - Developing a Training Plan

 Sunday

Assignment 9.2 - Case 6-19 - Budgeting for Reducing Payroll

 Sunday

Week 10: Healthcare Statistics and Research Method

Discussion 10.1 - Clinical Quality Improvement Research

Initial post due Wednesday/Responses
to peers due Sunday

Assignment 10.1 - Case 7-16 - Relative Risk Comparison

 Sunday

Assignment 10.2 - Case 7-34 - Skyview Hospital Monthly Statistical Report

 Sunday

Assignment 10.3 - PPE Log

 Sunday

Assignment 10.4 - Student Evaluation of PPE Site

 Sunday

Assignment 10.5 - Site Director Evaluation (student does not submit)

 Sunday

Week 11: Finals Week 

Discussion Forum 11.1 - Final Thoughts

Initial post due Wednesday/Responses
to peers due Thursday

Assignment 11.1 - PPE Reflection Paper

 Thursday

Grading Criteria

Assignment

Weight

Weekly Assignments

30%

Weekly Discussions

15%

PPE

45%

Final PPE Reflection Paper

10%

 Total

100%

 

Grades within the Learning Management System (LMS) are not official until the instructor reviews and finalizes all grades at the end of the quarter. Official grades are available Monday following the last week of the quarter.

Incomplete: A grade of incomplete may be granted to students who have suffered serious personal illness or critical emergency circumstances during the academic term, resulting in failure to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter. Documentation from a physician is required and must be attached to the petition for a temporary grade of incomplete. Please see the college catalog for additional information.

Late Policy
All assignments are due Sunday each week.  Each student will be allowed two late assignments.  The request to submit a late assignment must be received by the instructor no later than 12:00pm, Eastern on Monday after the week closes.  The late assignment(s) will be due by Thursday, 11:55pm, Eastern and five points per day will be deducted.  Any subsequent late assignment (assignment three forward) will be scored as a zero if not completed by Sunday each week. This policy only applies to assignments.  Quizzes, exams and discussions are not eligible for late submissions.

Grade Explanation

A
Excellent
90-100%

Full understanding of subject matter, capacity to analyze, demonstrate critical thinking, show evidence of creative thinking, familiar with literature and previous work in area, highly developed communication and presentation skills. Work is of outstanding quality.

B
Good
80-89%

Good comprehension of subject matter, evidence of critical and creative thought, familiarity with literature and previous work in subject area, competence in communication and presentation skills, but none of the above to the degree found in A category. Work is of very good quality.

C
Average
70-79%

Some understanding of subject matter and can assimilate and communicate basic aspects of the subject matter. Work is of satisfactory or adequate quality.

D
Below Average
60-69%

Minimal understanding of subject matter, poorly developed communication skills, inability to apply subject matter understanding in other contexts, and little evidence of critical or creative thinking. Work is of unsatisfactory but passable quality.

F
Failing
0-59%

Inadequate understanding of subject matter, failed to complete course requirements, shows no demonstration of critical thought, very poor communication skills. Work is of unacceptable quality.

 

HSS101X - Introduction to Human Services

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College Of Allied Health
Course Syllabus
HSS101X - Introduction to Human Services
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description

The main goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the field of Human Services. Students will learn the theory, knowledge, attitudes, values, and skills needed to become a Human Services professional. The course will examine the needs of vulnerable populations and the role of human service agencies to address those needs including their organization, service delivery system, staffing patterns, and funding sources. This explores the origin and development of the social welfare system as well as social welfare policy.

 

Course Prerequisite

None

 

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

·         Define Human Services and explain the reasons human services are needed

·         Identify populations and vulnerable groups in need

·         Identify the major influences in history of Human Services

·         Examine and compare models and perspectives to be applied in Human Services programs

·         Describe main roles and responsibilities of a human services worker and the interactions with human service agencies

·         Explore career and practice options in Human Services

·         Identify and describe major social policies the United States government has developed

·         Assess and apply interventions to address social issues

·         Describe the impact of cultural competency and diversity issues to address social need

·         Explain and apply ethical standards in the provision of human services

·         Assess and describe community needs and the multiple roles of community workers

·         Examine and critique problem solving and ethical issues in current issues

Assessment of Outcomes 
 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged


For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation

Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity

Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities

Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information

None

HSS220 - Diversity in Human Services

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Course Syllabus
HSS220 - Diversity in Human Services
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description

The focus of this course is to increase students’ cross-cultural awareness, knowledge, and skills in the assessment and provision of health and human services to diverse populations. Students will learn how to integrate culturally appropriate models tailored to the needs of diverse audiences. The interaction of race, culture, assumptions, myths, beliefs in the provision of human services will be examined.
 

 

Course Prerequisite

None

 

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

·         Define diversity of the population and examine demographic changes and migration in the U.S.

·         Define main terminologies related to diversity and cultural and linguistic competency in the provision of health and human services

·         Describe how cultural differences and variations can impact health services and health outcomes

·         Define the National CLAS Standards

·         Describe national programs and models to serve ethnic, racial, and minority groups.

·         Identify health disparities and social determinants of health that intersect with the health of populations

·         Describe the significance for health and human services providers to receive training in cross-cultural communication or cultural competency to reduce health disparities

·         Examine and describe vulnerable groups’ social and health needs

·         Examine and discuss characteristics of special groups and cultures including behavior, values, health beliefs, and traditions

·         Describe strategies to address cultural barriers

 

Assessment of Outcomes  

Specified on the course schedule/outline

Grading System

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation

Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity

Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University’s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

 

Students with Disabilities

Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

 

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information

None

MED171 Medical Ethics

Sullivan University

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MED171:  Medical Ethics

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: Since the allied health professional is an important member of the medical team and their awareness of multiple legal and ethical issues are critical in today�s health care environment, this course explores information relating to medical law and ethics.  The course is designed to assist the healthcare professional in better understanding the legal and ethical obligations to patients, healthcare providers and healthcare employers.  Topics in medical law, medical ethics, and bioethics are discussed.  Scope of practice, state and federal legislation, and state and federal licensing and certification requirements are covered in this course.

 

Course Prerequisite:  None

 

Class Time:         Residential: 4 days per week, 11 weeks, 50 minutes per day or

                       1 evening per week, 11 weeks, 3 hours and 20 minutes per evening

Distance Education: 11 weeks

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.        

1.       Understand the position of the medical employee in their relation to other paramedical groups and the physician

2.       Define law, ethics, morals and bioethics and describe their importance to the practice of medicine and to medical office personnel

3.       Define medical legal and ethical terms

4.       Formulate a foundation for ethical behavior and decision-making related to various medical ethics and related issues while treating patients with empathy and impartiality

5.       Understand state medical practice acts, the Federal Controlled Substance Act, and the general liability of physician employers

6.       Provide the student with a foundation for ethical behavior and decision making while treating all patients with empathy and impartiality

7.       Inform the student of the HIV infection process and the ethical and legal implications of the disease

8.       Stress the importance of maintaining confidentiality

9.       Use appropriate guidelines when releasing records or medical information

 

Text       Medical Law and Ethics, 5th Edition, Bonnie R. Fremgen, Prentice Hall, 2015.

 

Assessment of Outcomes

�         Quizzes

�         Homework/Group Work

�         Examinations

�         Project

Specified on course outline

 

 

 

 

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

                                                                                     

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: *** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

A minimum of 70% (�C�) is required to pass the course for the overall grade.

The student must successfully complete all of the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competencies may be completed as an independent check off, as a component of another competency check off, or evaluation by means of course exams.

Cognitive

 

X.C.1 Differentiate between scope of practice and standard of care for medical assistants

X.C.2 Compare and contrast provider and medical assistant roles in terms of standard of care

X.C.3 Describe components of the Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act (HIPAA)

X.C.4 Summarize the Patient Bill of Rights

X.C.5 Discuss licensure and certification as they apply to healthcare providers

X.C.6 Compare criminal and civil law as they apply to the practicing medical assistant

X.C.7 Define:

                a. negligence

                b. malpractice

                c. statute of limitations

                d. Good Samaritan Act

                e. Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

                f. living will/advanced directives

                g. medical durable power of attorney

                h. Patient Self-Discrimination Act (PSDA)

                i. risk management

X.C.8 Describe the following types of insurance:

                a. liability

                b. professional (malpractice)

                c. personal injury

X.C.9 List and discuss legal and illegal applicant interview questions

X.C.10 Identify:

                b. Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA)

                c. American with Disabilities Act Amendment Acts (ADAAA)

X.C.12 Describe compliance with public health statutes:

                a. communicable diseases

                b. abuse, neglect, and exploitation

                c. wounds of violence

X.C.13 Define the following medical legal terms:

                a. informed consent

                b. implied consent

                c. expressed consent

                d. patient incompetence

                e. emancipated minor

                f. mature minor

                g. subpoena duces tecum

                h. respondent superior

                i. res ipsa loquitor

                j. locum tenens

                k. defendant-plaintiff

                l. deposition

                m. arbitration-mediation

                n. Good Samaritan Laws

XI.C.1 Define:

a.        ethics

b.       morals

XI.X.2 Differentiate between personal and professional ethics

XI.C.3 Identify the effect of personal morals on professional performance

 

Psychomotor

 

X.P.1 Locate a state�s legal scope of practice for medical assistants

X.P.4 Apply the Patient�s Bill of Rights as it relates to:

                a. choice of treatment

                b. consent for treatment

                c. refusal of treatment

X.P.5 Perform compliance reporting based on public health statutes

X.P.6 Report an illegal activity in the healthcare setting following the proper protocol

XI.P.1 Develop a plan for separation of personal and professional ethics

XI.P.2 Demonstrate appropriate response(s) to ethical issues

 

Affective

 

III.A.1 Recognize the implications for failure to comply with Center for Disease Control (CDC) regulations in

healthcare settings

X.A.2 Protect the integrity of the medical record

XI.A.1 Recognize the impact personal ethics and morals have on the delivery of healthcare

MED173 Anatomy and Physiology II

Sullivan University
College of Allied Health 
Course Syllabus
Course #MED173 Anatomy and Physiology II
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This is a continuation of Course MSS123 with emphasis on the circulatory system, body defenses and immunity, urinary, respiratory, digestive, and reproductive systems.  Further discussion of disease processes will be included.

Course Prerequisite:  MSS123 (or MED172)
 

Class Time: 
Residential: 4 days per week, 11 weeks, 50 minutes per day or                       
1 evening per week, 11 weeks, 3 hours and 20 minutes per evening

Distance Education: 11 weeks

Required Text(s) and Resources:
The Human Body in Health and Disease- 13th Edition, Barbara Janson Cohen; Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins 2015.

Study Guide for The Human Body in Health and Disease- 13th Edition.  Kerry L. Hull & Barbara Janson Cohen; Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins 2015.

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.            List major organs for each listed body system

2.            Describe the normal function of each listed body system

3.            Identify common pathology related to each listed body system

4.            Analyze pathology as it relates to the interaction of listed body systems

5.            Discuss implications for disease and disability when homeostasis not maintained 

6.            Describe implications for treatment related to pathology of the listed body systems

7.            Describe the relationship between anatomy and physiology of the listed body systems and medications used for treatment in each

8.            Compare body structure and function of the human body across the life span

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

Grading System:


 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

                                                                                     

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.  

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog.  

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: *** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

A minimum of 70% (�C�) is required to pass the course for the overall grade.

MED173 � Anatomy and Physiology II
MAERB 2015 Standards

Cognitive
I.C.1 Describe structural organization of the human body
I.C.2 Identify body systems
I.C.3 Describe: 
I.C.4 List major organs in each body system
I.C.5 Identify the anatomical location of major organs in each body system
I.C.6 Compare body structure and function of the human body across the life span
I.C.7 Describe the normal function of each body system
I.C.8 Identify common pathology related to each body system including:

a.        Signs

b.       Symptoms

c.        Etiology

I.C.9 Analyze pathology for each body system including:       

a.        diagnostic measures

b.       treatment modalities

IV.C.1 Describe dietary nutrients including:

a.            Carbohydrates

b.            Fat

c.            Protein

d.            Minerals

e.            Electrolytes

f.             Vitamins

g.            Fiber

h.            Water

IV.C.2 Define the function of dietary supplements
IV.C.3 Identify the special dietary needs for:

a.            Weight control

b.            Diabetes

c.            Cardiovascular disease

d.            Hypertension

e.            Cancer

f.             Lactose sensitivity

g.            Gluten-free

h.            Food allergies

V.C.10 Define both medical terms and abbreviations related to all body systems

MED176 Medical Terminology

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Allied Heatlh

Course Syllabus

Course #176:  Medical Terminology

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: Students learn the prefixes, roots and suffixes used in medical terminology.  Medical specialties, operative terms and medical records terms complete the instruction.

 

Course Prerequisite:  None

 

Class Time:

Residential: 4 days per week, 11 weeks, 50 minutes per day or

                       1 evening per week, 11 weeks, 3 hours and 20 minutes per evening

Distance Education: 11 weeks

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Recognize and understand words in the daily use of medical terminology.

2.       Build appropriate medical terms from word parts learned, given the meaning of the word

3.       Identify new word parts in other medical terms and having learned the meaning, to be able to use these new words to both build and understand further medical terms.

4.       Build a complete professional vocabulary with expected proficiency in usage and spelling.

5.       Be recognize the importance and definition of words commonly used in medical transcription of routine medical report

 

COURSE TEXTBOOK & RESOURCES

Leonard, P. Building a medical vocabulary: With Spanish translations (10th ed.), 2018. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.

 

Stedman, Stedman�s Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing 7th Edition, 2011; Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: A minimum grade of 70% C is required to pass the class.

*** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies (see attached addendum list) prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA or MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

COMPETENCY EVALUATIONS COMPLETED IN THIS COURSE

The following evaluations are graded.  Students must attain a score of 90 or above on each competency skill to successfully complete the course.  Participation in plus Friday tutoring is strongly advised for any student having difficulty in meeting these competencies. 

The student must successfully complete all of the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competencies may be completed as an independent check off, as a component of another competency check off, or evaluation by means of course exams.

MED211 Medical Terminology
MAERB 2015 Standards


Cognitive

V.C.9 Identify medical terms labeling the word parts
V.C.10 Define medical terms and abbreviations related to all body systems

MED177: Pharmacology & Laboratory Terminology

ULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #177:  Pharmacology & Laboratory Terminology

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: This course introduces the principles of pharmacology, drug action, and therapy based on body systems and disease.  A review of clinical laboratory procedures, indications for testing, and interpretation of results gives the student an understanding of pharmacology and laboratory terminology.

 

Course Prerequisites:  MED172 (or MSS123), MED176

 

Class Time:

Residential: Day: Four days per week, 11 weeks per quarter, 50 minutes per class.

                Evening: One evening per week, 11 weeks per quarter, 3 hours 40 minutes per evening.

 

Distance Education � 11 weeks per quarter.  Students are required to follow distance education

attendance log in requirements.

                                               

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.        

  1. Gain a working knowledge of commonly used medications.
  2. Develop an understanding of the disease states requiring medication.
  3. Understand the vocabulary used in clinical laboratory testing as well as common testing names and results.

 

Text(s):

Understanding Pharmacology, Fifth Edition, Susan M. Turley, MA, RN, RHIT, CMT, Pearson Education, Inc., 2016.

Mosby�s Diagnostic & Laboratory Test Reference, 12th Ed., K. Pagana, T.J. Pagana, & T.N. Pagana, Mosby, 2015.

Mosby�s Nursing Drug Reference, 30th edition, Linda Skidmore-Roth, RN, MSN, NP.  Elsevier, 2018.

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

 

A grade of C or better is required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog.

MED178: Medical Insurance

Sullivan University

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MED178:  Medical Insurance

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: This course familiarizes students with health insurance and managed care, medical professional fees, and reimbursement through claim processing, billing and collections.

 

Course Prerequisite:  MED270

 

Class Time: 
Four days per week, 11 weeks per quarter, 50 minutes per class

OR
Distance Education - 11 weeks per quarter.  Students are required to follow distance education attendance log in requirements.

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Apply managed care policies and procedures.

2.       Apply third party guidelines.

3.       Obtain managed care referrals and pre-certification.

4.       Use a physician�s fee schedule.

5.       Complete insurance claim forms.

6.       Perform billing and collection procedures.

7.       Utilize computer software to maintain office systems.

8.       Risk management evaluation in insurance application.

9.       Perform routine bank deposit procedures for service fees collected

Assessment of Outcomes:   Specified on course outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

                                                                                     

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: 

Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

The student must successfully complete all of the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competencies may be completed as an independent check off, as a component of another competency check off, or by means of a course activity or exam.

Cognitive
V.C.7  Recognize elements of fundamental writing skills
VII.C.1 Define the following bookkeeping terms:

a.        charges;

b.       payments;

c.        accounts receivable;

d.       accounts; e. adjustments

VII.C.2 Describe banking procedures as related to the ambulatory care setting
VII.C.3 Identify precautions for accepting the following types payments:

a.        cash;

b.       check;

c.        credit card;

d.       debit card

VII.C.4 Describe types of adjustments made to patient accounts including:

a.        non-sufficient funds (NSF) check;

b.       collection agency transaction;

c.        credit balance;

d.       third party

VII.C.5 Identify types of information contained in the patient�s billing record
VII.C.6 Explain patient financial obligations for services rendered
VIII.C.1 Identify:

a.        types of third party plans;

b.       information required to file a third party claim;

c.        the steps to filing a third party claim

VIII.C.2 Outline managed care requirements for patient referral
VIII.C.3 Describe processes for:

a.        verification of eligibility for services;

b.       precertification;

c.        preauthorization

IX.C.5 Define medical necessity as it applies to procedural and diagnostic coding
X.C.3 Describe components of the Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act (HIPAA)
X.C.7 Define:

a.        negligence

b.       malpractice

c.        statute of limitations

d.       Good Samaritan Act

e.        Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

f.        living will/advanced directives

g.       medical durable power of attorney

h.       Patient Self-Discrimination Act (PSDA)

i.         risk management

X.C.11 Describe the process in compliance reporting:

a.        unsafe activities�;

b.       errors in patient care;

c.        conflicts of interest;

d.       incident reports

Psychomotor

VII.P.1 Perform accounts receivable procedures to patient accounts including posting:

a.        charges;

b.       payments; 

c.        adjustments

VII.P.2 Prepare bank deposits
VII.P.4 Inform a patient of financial obligations for services rendered
VIII.P.1 interpret information on an insurance card
VIII.P.2 Verify eligibility for services including documentation
VIII.P.3 Obtain certification or preauthorization including documentation
VIII.P.4 Complete an insurance claim form

Affective

VII.A.1 Demonstrate professionalism when discussing patient�s billing record
VII.A.2 Display sensitivity when requesting payment for services rendered
VIII.A.1 Interact professionally with third party representatives
VIII.A.2 Display tactful behavior when communicating with medical providers regarding third party requirements
VIII.A.3 Show sensitivity when communicating with patients regarding third party requirements

MED179: Compliance Issues

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Course Syllabus
Course #MED179: Compliance Issues
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This course will introduce the coding/healthcare reimbursement student to issues of medical billing compliance. Topics such as fraud and abuse, compliance plan elements, penalties, and OIG (office of Inspector General) will be addressed. In addition, the student will learn comprehensive chart auditing techniques, which include documentation standards, third-party requirements, and risk management. 

Course Prerequisites:  MED290, MED178 (MED178 can be a co-requisite)

Class Time:  Four days per week, 11 weeks per quarter, 50 minutes per class.
                       OR
                       Distance Education � 11 weeks per quarter.  Students are required to follow distance education attendance log in requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Accurately identify and differentiate between Fraud and Abuse.

2.       Demonstrate knowledge of Basic Healthcare Compliance Laws (including, but not limited to: Stark Laws, Anti-kickback Statutes, HIPAA).

3.       Demonstrate application of Compliance Practices for the Health Care Facility.

4.       Demonstrate understanding of the OIG�s Work Plan and its impact on the Health Care Facility through written Corporate Compliance Manual.

5.       Demonstrate advanced understanding of the AMA�s guidelines for coding of E/M Services.

6.       Perform chart audits on varied services for both inpatient and outpatient services.

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

Grading System:

Letter Grade    

Range    

Definition    

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks    

NF

-----

Failing - not actively engaged

 

 

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.  

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog.  

 

 

Winter 2019

MED209X Advanced Terminology For Medical Coding

Spencerian College

Course #209X Syllabus

COURSE TITLE:  Advanced Terminology For Medical Coding                              4 credits

Prerequisite:  176

Corequisite: 277 (may be taken previously)

 

I.  Class Time:          11 week web-assisted course

II.      Course Description:

In this course the coding student will gain additional knowledge of advanced medical  terms pertaining to diagnoses, diseases, anatomy & physiology, treatment modalities, and procedures to enhance the process of abstracting data from medical records to facilitate coding.

 

III.      Course Objectives:

�         Recognize and understand common medical procedures and treatments.

�         Build a professional vocabulary of advanced medical terms.

�         Utilize the advanced terminology to accurately identify and code medical services for reimbursement to the healthcare provider.

IV.     Texts:

Medical Terminology: A Living Language, 6th Edition, Fremgen & Frucht, Pearson, 2016.

Netter's Atlas of Human Anatomy for CPT Coding, 2nd Ed., Kirschner, AMA Press, 2009

Stedman's Medical Dictionary for Health Professionals and Nursing, 7th edition, Wolters, Kluer, LWW, 2012.

 

V. Teaching Strategy:

This course is taught through weekly instructor-guided lessons, interactive class discussion board, Power Point presentations, illustrations, interactive assignments, and exams.

 

VI.  Course Outline

�         Introduction to Medical Terminology, Body Structures

�         Integumentary System Terminology

�         Musculoskeletal System Terminology

�         Cardiovascular System Terminology

�         Blood, Lymphatic, & Immune Systems Terminology

�         Respiratory System Terminology

�         Digestive & Urinary Systems Terminology

�         Reproductive System Terminology

�         Endocrine & Nervous Systems Terminology

�         Eye &  Ear systems Terminology, Special Topics

 

VII.  Evaluation:

          Quizzes/Exams             10%

          Assignments                  20%

          Comprehensive Final    70% (proctored outside course)

 

 

Grading Scale:

A = 90 or more points
B = 80 to 89 points
C = 70 to 79 points
D = 60 to 69 points
F = 59 and below

                         

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Spencerian College recognizes and supports the standards set forth in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, which are designed to prevent discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. Disabilities are defined as mental and/or physical impairments which substantially limit one or more of a person�s major life activities, and which necessitate modifications to the facilities, programs, or services of the College. Spencerian College is committed to making reasonable accommodations for qualifying students in accordance with law and to creating full accessibility to campus facilities. Spencerian College cannot, however, make accommodations that are unduly burdensome or that fundamentally alter the nature of the College�s programs. Qualifying students need to contact their department director or the Associate Dean of Student Affairs at the beginning of their program to ensure that the student benefits from the maximum assistance possible. Medical documentation of their disability and the requested accommodations must be presented in writing at that time.                                                                      

Revised Fall 2016

MED211: Health and Safety Techniques

Sullivan University

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MED211:  Health and Safety Techniques

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: Students become certified CPR basic rescuers (American Heart Association Healthcare Provider with AED).  Medical asepsis and infection control are discussed.  Training in vital signs and first aid procedures complete this course.

Course Prerequisite:  None

 

Class Time:         Residential:  4 days per week, 11 weeks, 65 minutes per day or

                       1 evening per week, 11 weeks, 4 hours and 20 minutes per evening

Distance Education: 11 weeks

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Perform Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation according to guidelines of the American Heart Association.

2.       Perform First Aid procedures

3.       Demonstrate adherence with OSHA bloodborne pathogens standards, Fire Prevention, and Ergonomics training mandates

4.       Perform Vital Signs

Text

BLS for Healthcare Providers; AHA, 2016.

Health & Safety Techniques; Spencerian College, Elsevier, 2011.

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline.

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

                                                                                     

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: *** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

A minimum of 70% (�C�) is required to pass the course for the overall grade.

COMPETENCY EVALUATIONS COMPLETED IN THIS COURSE

The following evaluations are graded.  Students must attain a score of 90 or above on each competency skill to successfully complete the course.  Participation in plus Friday tutoring is strongly advised for any student having difficulty in meeting these competencies.

The student must successfully complete all of the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competencies may be completed as an independent check off, as a component of another competency check off, or evaluation by means of course exams.

MED211 Health and Safety

MAERB 2015 Standards

 

Cognitive

 

I.C.13 List principles and steps of professional/provider CPR

I.C.14 Describe basic principles of first aid as they pertain to the ambulatory healthcare setting

III.C.1 List major types of infectious agents

III.C.2. Describe the infection cycle including:

a.        The infectious agent

b.       Reservoir

c.        Susceptible host

d.       Means of transmission

e.        Portals of entry

f.        Portals of exit

III.C.5 Define the principles of standard precautions

III.C.6 Define personal protective equipment (PPE) for:

a.        All body fluids, secretions and excretions

b.       Blood

c.        Non-intact skin

d.       Mucous membranes

X.C.11 Describe the process in compliance reporting:

a.        unsafe activities

b.       errors in patient care

c.        conflicts of interest

d.       incident reports

XII.C.1 Identify:

a.        safety signs

b.       symbols

c.        labels

XII.C.2 Identify safety techniques that can be used in responding to accidental exposure to:

a.        Blood

b.       Other body fluids

c.        Needle sticks

d.       Chemicals

XII.C.3 Discuss fire safety issues in the ambulatory healthcare environment

XII.C.4 Describe fundamental principles for evacuation of a healthcare setting

XII.C.5 Describe the purpose of Safety Data Sheets (SDS) in a healthcare setting

XII.C.6 Discuss protocols for disposal of biological chemical materials

XII.C.7 Identify principles of:

a.        Body mechanics

b.       Ergonomics

XII.C.8 Identify critical elements of an emergency plan for response to a natural disaster or other

emergency

 

Psychomotor

 

I.P.1 Measure and record:

                a. blood pressure

                b. temperature

                c. pulse

                d. respirations

                e. height

                f. weight

I.P.12 Produce up-to-date documentation of provider/professional level CPR

I.P.13. Perform first aid procedures for:

                a. bleeding

                b. diabetic coma or insulin shock

                c. fractures

                d. seizures

                e. shock

                f. syncope

III.P.1 Participate in bloodborne pathogen training

III.P.2 Select appropriate barrier/personal protective equipment

III.P.8 Perform wound care

III.P.9 Perform dressing change
X.P.7 Complete an incident report related to an error in patient care

XII.P.1 Comply with:

                a. safety signs

                b. symbols

                c. labels

XII.P.2 Demonstrate proper use of:

b. Fire extinguisher

XII.P.3 Use proper body mechanics

XII.P.4 Participate in a mock exposure event with documentation of specific steps

XII.P.5 Evaluate the work environment to identify unsafe working conditions

 

Affective

V.A.2 Demonstrate the principles of self-boundary

XII.A.1 Recognize the physical and emotional effects on a person involved in an emergency situation

XII.A.2 Demonstrate self-awareness in responding to an emergency situation

MED212: Medical Laboratory Procedures

Sullivan University

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MED212:  Medical Laboratory Procedures

Credit Hours: 6

 

Course Description: Students are trained in patient instruction, quality control, blood collection and lab procedures.  These procedures include hematology, immunology, microbiology, chemistry, urinalysis, venipuncture, capillary sticks, and the care of and use of the microscope.

Course Prerequisite:  MED173, MED176

 

Class Time:         Residential:  4 days per week, 11 weeks, 110 minutes per day or

                       1 evening per week, 11 weeks, 3 hours and 40 minutes per evening

Distance Education: 11 weeks

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.  Properly obtain specimens of urine, blood, and other body fluids for laboratory examination.

2.  Properly operate and maintain the microscope.

3.  Demonstrate methods and procedures for completion of commonly ordered waived laboratory testing used in the laboratory.

Text

 

Clinical Procedures for Medical Assistants; 10th ed., Bonewit-West, 2017, Saunders.

Student Manual for Clinical Procedures for Medical Assistants; 10th edition, Bonewit-West, 2017,  Saunders.

 

 

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline.

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

                                                                                     

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: *** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

A minimum of 70% (�C�) is required to pass the course for the overall grade.

COMPETENCY EVALUATIONS COMPLETED IN THIS COURSE

The following evaluations are graded.  Students must attain a score of 90 or above on each competency skill to successfully complete the course.  Participation in plus Friday tutoring is strongly advised for any student having difficulty in meeting these competencies.

The student must successfully complete all of the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competencies may be completed as an independent check off, as a component of another competency check off, or evaluation by means of course exams.

 

Cognitive

 

I.C.10  Identify CLIA waived tests associated with common diseases
I.C.12  Identify quality assurance practices in healthcare
III.C.4  Identify methods of controlling the growth of microorganisms
VI.C.9 Explain the purpose of routine maintenance of administrative and clinical equipment
VI.C.10  Lists steps involved in completing an inventory
XII.C.1 Identify:  a. safety signs; b. symbols, c. labels
XII.C. 2 Identify safety techniques that can be used in responding to accidental exposure to:

a.        blood;

b.       other body ffluids;

c.        needle sticks;

d.       chemicals

Psychomotor

I.P.2 Perform:  b. venipuncture; c. capillary puncture
I.P.10 Perform a quality control measure
I.P.11 Obtain specimens and perform:

a.        CLIA waived hematology test;

b.       CLIA waived chemistry test; 

c.        CLIA waived urinalysis;

d.       CLIA waived immunology test;

e.        CLIA waived microbiology test

II.P.2 Differentiate between normal and abnormal test results
II.P.3 Maintain lab test results using flow sheets
III.P.2 Select appropriate barrier/personal protective equipment (PPE)
III.P.3 Perform handwashing
III.P.10 Demonstrate proper disposal of biohazardous material:

a.        sharps;

b.       regulated wastes

V.P.11 Report relevant information concisely and accurately
VI.P.8 Perform routine maintenance of administrative or clinical equipment
VI.P.9 Perform inventory with documentation
XII.P.1 Comply with:

a.        safety;

b.       symbols;

c.        labels

XII.P.2 Demonstrate proper use of:

a.        eyewash;

b.       sharps disposal

Affective

I.A.1 Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient assessment
I.A.2 Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient care
I.A.3 Show awareness of a patient�s concerns related to the procedure being performed
II.A.1 Reassure the patient of the accuracy of the test results
V.A.2 Demonstrate the principles of self-boundaries
V.A.3 Demonstrate respect for individual diversity including:

a.        gender;

b.       race;

c.        religion;

d.       age;

e.        economic status;

f.        appearance

V.A.4 Explain to a patient the rationale for performance of a procedure
X.A.2 Protect the integrity of the medical record


The preceding practical evaluations are graded.  Students must attain a score of 90 or above on each skill to successfully complete the course.  Participation in plus Friday tutoring is strongly advised for any student having difficulty in meeting these competencies.

MED213: Advanced Clinical Skills

Sullivan University

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MED213:  Advanced Clinical Skills

Credit Hours: 3

 

Course Description: The main focus of this course is pharmacology and the preparation and administration of medications.  Also covered are radiation preparation and safety issues.

Course Prerequisite:  MED171, MED173, MED176

 

Class Time:         Residential:  4 days per week, 11 weeks, 50 minutes per day or

                       Night - 1 evening per week, 11 weeks, 3 hours and 40 minutes per evening

Distance Education: 11 weeks

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate the ability to interpret abbreviations and symbols used by physicians when writing prescriptions.

2. Understand the various classifications of drugs.

3. Prepare medication to be administered orally, intramuscularly, subcutaneously and intradermal.

4. Compute medication dosage using standard conversion tables.

5. Administrations of medication--orally and parentally.

6. Practice safety while positioning patients for radiation procedures.

7. Demonstrate knowledge in identifying risk management issues in the clinical setting.

8. Demonstrate knowledge of basic pulmonary function testing.

Text

Clinical Procedures for Medical Assistants; 10th ed., Bonewit-West, 2017, Saunders.

Student Manual for Clinical Procedures for Medical Assistants; 10th edition, Bonewit-West, 2017,  Saunders.

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline.

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

                                                                                     

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: *** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

A minimum of 70% (�C�) is required to pass the course for the overall grade.

The student must successfully complete all of the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competencies may be completed as an independent check off, as a component of another competency check off, or evaluation by means of course exams.

The preceding practical evaluations are graded.  Students must attain a score of 90 or above on each skill to successfully complete the course.

 

Cognitive

I.C.11 Identify the classifications of medications including:

a.        indications for use

b.       desired effects

c.        side effects

d.       adverse reactions

II.C.1 Demonstrate knowledge of basic math computations
II.C.2 Apply mathematical computations to solve equations
II.C.3. Define basic units of measurement in:

a.        The metric system

b.       The household system

II.C.4 Covert among measurement systems
II.C.5 Identify abbreviations and symbols used in calculating medication dosages
XII.C.1 Identify:

a.        safety signs;

b.       symbols;

c.        labels

XII.C.2 Identify safety techniques that can be used in responding to an accidental exposure to:

a.        blood;

b.       other body fluids;

c.        needle sticks;

d.       chemicals

Psychomotor

I.P.4 Verify the rules of medication administration:

a.        right patient

b.       right medication

c.        right dose

d.       right route

e.        right time

f.        right documentation

I.P.5 Select proper sites for administering parenteral medication
I.P.6 Administer oral medication
I.P.7 Administer parenteral (excluding IV) medications
II.P.1 Calculate proper dosages of medication for administration
III.P.2 Select appropriate barrier/personal protective equipment (PPE)
III.P.3 Perform handwashing
III.P.10 Demonstrate proper disposal of biohazardous material

a.        sharps

b.       regulated waste

V.P.4 Coach patient regarding:

a.        office policies

b.       health maintenance

c.        disease prevention

d.       treatment plan

V.P.11 Report relevant information concisely an accurately
XII.P.1 Comply with:

a.        safety;

b.       symbols;

c.        labels

XII.P.2 Demonstrate proper use of: c. sharps disposal

Affective

X.A.2 Protect the integrity of the medical record

MED214: Phlebotomy Techniques

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Course Syllabus
Course #MED214: Phlebotomy Techniques
Credit Hours: 6

Course Description

 

Students are trained in patient instruction, quality control, blood collection and lab procedures.  These procedures include hematology, immunology, microbiology, chemistry, urinalysis, venipuncture, capillary sticks, and the care of and use of the microscope.

 

Course Prerequisite

MED172

Class Time: 
Residential:  4 days per week, 11 weeks, 65 minutes per day or                       
2 evenings per week, 11 weeks, 4 hours and 20 minutes per evening
Distance Education: 11 weeks

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Follow universal precautions in specimen collection and handling.

2.       Determine types of patient preparation and give patient instructions.

3.       Follow the concepts of quality assurance and quality control.

4.       Properly collect laboratory specimens including blood and urine.

5.       Process samples according to standard operating procedures.

Text:

Phlebotomy, Fourth Edition, Robin S. Warekois, Richard Robinson, Elsevier, Inc., 2016.

Assessment of Outcomes  

Specified on the course schedule/outline

Grading System

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.  

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation

Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity

Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

 

Students with Disabilities

Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

 

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information  *** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

A minimum of 70% (�C�) is required to pass the course for the overall grade.

Plus Friday tutoring is strongly advised for any student having difficulty in meeting course requirements.

 

None

MED216X: Phlebotomy Exam Review

Sullivan University
College of Allied Health
Course Syllabus
Course #MED216X:  Phlebotomy Exam Review
Credit Hours: 3

Course Description: Students are trained in patient instruction, quality control, blood collection and lab procedures.  These procedures include hematology, immunology, microbiology, chemistry, urinalysis, venipuncture, capillary sticks, and the care of and use of the microscope.

Course Prerequisite:  MED214 

Class Time: Distance Education:  4 weeks web-assisted

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Identify the rationalization behind certifications of health professionals in the field of phlebotomy.

2.       Determine types of certification options available to the phlebotomist

3.       Follow procedures for registration for certification examination.

4.       Review pertinent topics covered on the certification examination

5.       Review test taking strategies

6.       Complete a MOCK certification examination

Text:

Complete Phlebotomy Exam Review, 2nd Edition, Pamela B. Primrose, Saunders Elsevier, Inc., 2016.

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline.

Grading System:
 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.  

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog.  

A minimum of 70% (�C�) is required to pass the course for the overall grade.

Plus Friday tutoring is strongly advised for any student having difficulty in meeting course requirements.

MED270 Medical Administrative Techniques

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MED270 Medical Administrative Techniques

Credit Hours: 3

 

Course Description: This course covers the various administrative front office duties in a medical setting including patient communications, record keeping/health information management, appointment scheduling, patient reception, financial management of patient accounts, and general facility environment issues.

 

Course Prerequisite:  None

 

Class Time:
Four days per week, 11 weeks per quarter, 50 minutes per class.
OR
Distance Education � 11 weeks per quarter.  Students are required to follow distance education attendance log in requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Schedule and manage appointments and inpatient/outpatient admissions and   procedures.  

2.       Establish and maintain the medical record and document appropriately.  

3.       Post charges, adjustments, NSF checks, and collection agency payments.  

4.       Perform accounts receivable and payable procedures.

5.       Process credit balance and refunds.

6.       Interact with patients through written, verbal, and non-verbal communications.  

7.       Demonstrate telephone techniques and perform in-person screenings.  

8.       Demonstrate knowledge of identifying risk management issues in administrative medical practices.

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: A minimum grade of 70% C is required to pass the class.

Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

The student must successfully complete all of the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competencies may be completed as an independent check off, as a component of another competency check off, or by means of a course activity or exam.

 

Cognitive

V.C.1 Identify styles and types of verbal communication
V.C.2 Identify types of nonverbal communication
V.C.3 Recognize barriers to communication
V.C.4 Identify techniques for overcoming communication barriers
V.C.5 Recognize the elements of oral communication using a send-receiver process
V.C.7 Recognize elements of fundamental writing skills
V.C.11 Define the principles of self-boundaries
V.C.14  Relate the following behaviors to professional communications: a. assertive; b. aggressive; c. passive
V.C.15 Differentiate between adaptive and non-adaptive coping mechanisms
V.C.17  Discuss the theories of: a. Maslow; b. Erikson; c. Kubler-Ross
V.C.18 Discuss examples of diversity; a. cultural; b. social; c. ethnic
VI.C.1 Identify different types of appointment scheduling
VI.C.2 Identify advantages and disadvantages of the following appointment systems: a. manual; b. electronic
VI.C.3 Identify critical information required for scheduling patient procedures
VI.C.5 Identify methods of organizing the patient�s medical record based on: a. problem-oriented medical record (POMR) ; b. source-oriented medical record (SOMR)
VI.C.6 Identify equipment and supplies needed for medical records in order to: a. Create; b. Maintain; c. Store
VI.C.7 Describe filing indexing rulesVII.C.1 Define the following bookkeeping terms: a. charges; b. payments; c. accounts receivable; d. accounts; e. adjustments
VII.C.4 Describe types of adjustments made to patient accounts including: a. non-sufficient funds (NSF) check; b. collection agency transaction; c. credit balance; d. third partyVIII.C.1 Identify: a. types of third party plans; b. information required to file a third party claim; c. the steps to filing a third party claim

Psychomotor

V.P.1 Use feedback techniques to obtain patient information including: a. reflection; b. restatement; c. clarification
V.P.2 Respond to nonverbal communication
V.P.4  Coach patients regarding: a. office policies
V.P.5 Coach patients appropriately considering: a. cultural diversity; b. developmental life stage; c. communication barriers
V.P.6 Demonstrate professional telephone techniques
V.P.7 Document telephone messages accurately
VI.P.1 Manage appointment schedule using established priorities
VI.P.2 Schedule a patient procedure
VI.P.3 Create a patient�s medical record
VI.P.4 Organize a patient�s medical record
VI.P.5 File patient medical records
VII.P.2 Obtain accurate patient billing information
VII.P.4 Inform a patient of financial obligations for services rendered

Affective

V.A.1 Demonstrate: a. empathy; b. active listening; c. nonverbal communications
VI.A.1 Display sensitivity when managing appointments
VIII.A.3 Show sensitivity when communicating with patients regarding third party requirements

MED274 Medical Assistant Techniques

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MED274 Medical Assistant Techniques

Credit Hours: 3

 

Course Description: The theory and principles of the clinical side of medical assisting are introduced while providing the student with hands-on practice to perfect technique.  Procedures covered include charting, height and weight, the physical exam, and minor office surgery.  Proper electrocardiogram techniques complete this course.

 

Course Prerequisite:  MED173, MED176

 

Class Time:
Residential: Day - 4 days per week for 11 weeks, 50-minute class per day OR                         
Night - 1 night per week for 11 weeks, 3 hours and 40 minutes per class
Distance Education: 11 weeks

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate the ability to utilize all aspects of the patient�s medical record and document appropriately in the medical record.

2. Demonstrate proper use of OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Standards

3. Identify regulated medical waste and bloodborne diseases

4. Explain the Hazard Communication Standard and demonstrate proper disinfection, sterilization, and sanitization techniques according to current healthcare standards.

5. Prepare patients for physical examination including body mechanics, positioning, and draping.

6. Perform patient assessments and assist provider with patient examination.

7. Demonstrate proper evaluation procedures for visual acuity at a distance and color vision assessment with a complete understanding of the anatomy of the eye.

8. Adapt communication to individuals' ability to understand and demonstrate effective communication with patients during assessment and instruction.

9. Instruct patient�s in health maintenance, nutrition, and screening procedures.

10. Perform pediatric growth measurements and charting in the medical record.

11. Perform minor surgery office procedure preparation and wound care.

12. Perform 12-lead, three-channel ECG.

Text:

Clinical Procedures for Medical Assistants; 10th ed., Bonewit-West, 2017, Saunders.

Student Manual for Clinical Procedures for Medical Assistants; 10th edition, Bonewit-West, 2017,  Saunders.

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: 

*** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA, MAMA w/PHLEB), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

A minimum grade of 70% C is required to pass the class.

The student must successfully complete all of the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competencies may be completed as an independent check off, as a component of another competency check off, or evaluation by means of course exams.

The preceding practical evaluations are graded. Students must attain a score of 90% or greater on each skill to successfully complete the course.  

Cognitive

II.C.6 Analyze healthcare results as reported in:

a.            graphs

b.            tables

III.C.3 Define the following as practiced within the ambulatory care setting:

a.            medical asepsis

b.            surgical asepsis

III.C.4 Identify methods of controlling the growth of microorganisms
III.C.7. Identify Center for Disease Control (CDC) regulations that impact healthcare practices
V.C.6 Define coaching a patient as it relates to:

a.             health maintenance

b.            Disease prevention

c.            compliance with treatment plan

d.            community resources

e.            adaptations relevant to individual patient needs

V.C.12 Define patient navigator
V.C.13 Describe the role of the medical assistant as the patient navigator
V.C.16 Differentiate between subjective and objective information
VI.C.4  Define types of information contained in the patient�s medical record
VI.C.5  Identify methods of organizing a patient�s medical record based on:

a.            problem-oriented medical record (POMR);

b.            source-oriented medical record (SOMR

)XII.C.1 Identify: c. labels

Psychomotor

I.P.1 Measure and record: 

a.            ength (infant)

b.            head circumference (infant)

c.            pulse oximetry

I.P.2 Perform:

a.            electrocardiogram;

b.            pulmonary function testing

I.P.3 Perform patient screening using established protocols
I.P.8 Instruct and prepare a patient for a procedure or a treatment
I.P.9 Assist provider with patient exam
II.P.4 Document on a growth chart
III.P.2 Select appropriate barrier/personal protective equipment (PPE)
III.P.3 Perform handwashing
III.P.4 Prepare items for autoclaving
III.P.5 Perform sterilization procedures
III.P.6 Prepare a sterile field
III.P.7 Perform within a sterile field
III.P.10 Demonstrate proper disposal of biohazardous material:

a.            sharps

b.            regulated waste

IV.P.1 Instruct a patient according to patient�s special dietary needs
V.P.3 Use medical terminology correctly and pronounced accurately to communicate information to providers and patients
V.P.4 Coach patients regarding: b. health maintenance; c. disease prevention; d. treatment plan
V.P.9 Develop a current list of community resources related to patient�s healthcare
V.P.10 Facilitate referrals to community resources in the role of a patient navigator
VI.P.8 Perform routine maintenance of administrative or clinical equipment
X.P.2 Apply HIPAA rules in regard to:

a.            privacy;

b.            release of information

X.P.3 Document patient care accurately in the medical record
XII.P.1 Comply with:

a.            safety signs

b.            symbols

c.            labels

XII.P.II Demonstrate proper use of: c. Sharps disposal 

Affective

I.A.1 Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient assessment
I.A.2 Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient care
I.A.3 Show awareness of a patient's concern related to the procedure being performed
IV.A.1 Show awareness of patient�s concerns regarding a dietary change
V.A.3 Demonstrate respect for individual diversity including:

a.            Gender

b.            Race

c.            Religion

d.            Age

e.            Economic status

f.             Appearance

X.A.1 Demonstrate sensitivity to patient�s rights
X.A.2 Protect the integrity of the medical record

MED277: Introduction to Medical Coding

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MED277: Introduction to Medical Coding

Credit Hours: 3

 

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the history and basic concepts of medical coding.  Students learn how to use CPT and ICD10-CM coding manuals.  They will perform CPT coding in areas of Evaluation and Management, Anesthesia, Surgery, Radiology, Pathology, Laboratory, and Medicine as well as basic ICD-10. 

 

Course Prerequisite:  MED172 and MED176

 

Class Time:
Four days per week for 11 weeks, 50-minute class per day 
OR                         
Distance Education - 11 weeks per quarter. Students are required to follow distance education attendance log in requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.            Demonstrate proper use of CPT and ICD coding manuals.

2.            Assign proper CPT codes to basic medical procedures.

3.            Assign proper ICD codes to basic medical diagnoses.

4.            Demonstrate an understanding of the relation between medical coding and reimbursement to healthcare providers.

5.            Demonstrate knowledge in identifying risk management issues in medical coding.

6.            Demonstrate knowledge of methods to work with physician to achieve maximum reimbursement 

Text:

Step-By-Step Medical Coding (current year edition of both text and workbook); Carol Buck, MS, CPC, COC, CCS-P, Elsevier.                
ICD-10_CM Professional for Hospitals; (current year).  Optum360, LLC.
CPT Professional Edition, (current year); American Medical Association Press.               
Dorland�s Dictionary of Medical Acronyms & Abbreviations, 7th edition; Stanley Jablonski, 2016, Elsevier. 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: 

***The student must successfully complete the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competency evaluation is done by means of the cumulative final exam in this course.  A minimum score of 70% is required on the final exam in order to demonstrate competency to pass the course.  Students who score less than 70% on the final cannot pass the class regardless of their grade status on the other items in the course.

 

Cognitive

IX.C.1  Describe how to use the most current procedural coding system
IX.C.2 Describe how to use the most current diagnostic coding classification system
IX.C.3 Describe how to use the most current HCPCS level II coding system
IX.C.4 Discuss the effects of: a. upcoding; b. downcoding

Psychomotor

IX.P.1 Perform procedural coding
IX.P.2 Perform diagnostic coding
IX.P.3 Utilize medical necessity guidelines

Affective

IX.A.1    Utilize tactful communication skills with medical providers to ensure accurate code selection

If the minimum competency score of 70% must be achieved on the final exam and the final overall score for all course work must be at least a 70% to pass the course.

MED289: Medical Coding II

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MED289: Medical Coding II

Credit Hours: 3

 

Course Description: This course will expand the student�s coding knowledge into more advanced coding training in CPT and ICD-10.  The student will also be introduced to Level II HCPCS codes, Documentation Guidelines, and Third Party Reimbursement Issues.  Students will learn and perform coding of various medical services from source documents (chart notes, written summaries, operative notes) and research employment opportunities in coding. 

 

Course Prerequisite:  MED173 and MED277

 

Class Time:
Four days per week for 11 weeks, 50-minute class per day 
OR                         
Distance Education - 11 weeks per quarter. Students are required to follow distance education attendance log in requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Assign proper CPT, ICD-10, and Level II HCPCS Codes to various medical services by abstracting the appropriate data from source documents. 

2. Demonstrate appropriate usage/assignment of modifiers to medical procedures/services.

3. Demonstrate an understanding of the relation between CPT coding and reimbursement to healthcare providers.

4. Identify employment opportunities in the field of Medical Coding.

Text:

Step-By-Step Medical Coding (current year edition of both text and workbook); Carol Buck, MS, CPC, COC, CCS-P, Elsevier.                
ICD-10_CM Professional for Hospitals; (current year).  Optum360, LLC.
CPT Professional Edition, (current year); American Medical Association Press.      
HCPCS Level II Professional, (current year), 14th edition, Ingenix.         
Dorland�s Dictionary of Medical Acronyms & Abbreviations, 7th edition; Stanley Jablonski, 2016, Elsevier. 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: 

**A MANDATORY MOCK Coding Proficiency Exam is given on the Friday of Week 9 each quarter.  ALL MEDICAL CODING AND HEALTHCARE REIMBURSEMENT STUDENTS (Day, Night, and Online) THAT HAVE REACHED MEDICAL CODING II #289 OR ABOVE IN THEIR PROGRAMS ARE REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE EACH QUARTER AS A REQUIREMENT OF THE ACADEMIC CURRICULUM. Attendance is required either on campus from 8:00am until completion of the 5- hour examination, which may take until 2:00pm, or via the online exam format.  Participation in this examination will count as a 150-point portion of the homework grade for this course.  There will be NO make-up opportunities for the MOCK Coding Proficiency Exam, nor will there be any excused absences.  NO EXCEPTIONS.

Failure to participate in the exam will result in grade reduction which may cause failure of this course and the student will be subject to dismissal from their academic program at the discretion of the Program Director.

***The research project is a mandatory requirement of this course.  Failure to submit this project according to the guidelines and by the stated deadline will result in failure of course regardless of the student�s grades on other items in the course.

MED290: Medical Coding III

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MED290: Medical Coding III

Credit Hours: 3

 

Course Description: This course will further expand the student�s coding skills in abstracting full data from medical records and combining the coding systems (CPT, ICD-10, and HCPCS) to insure accurate linkage of procedure to diagnosis.  The student will also be introduced to ICD-CM, ICD-PCS, and DRG�s for hospital inpatient and outpatient coding.  The student will also gain knowledge of certification avenues through research and mock examinations

 

Course Prerequisite:  MED289 and MED209

 

Class Time:
Four days per week for 11 weeks, 50-minute class per day 
OR                         
Distance Education - 11 weeks per quarter. Students are required to follow distance education attendance log in requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.       Demonstrate the ability to accurately abstract full data from various medical source documents.

2.       Accurately assign codes and modifiers from all of the coding systems (CPT, ICD-10, and HCPCS).

3.       Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate linkage of procedure to diagnosis in all of the coding systems and its relation to reimbursement. 

4.       Assign ICD-10-PCS codes to inpatient and outpatient hospital services.

5.       Demonstrate a basic understanding of DRG theory and application for hospital coding.

6.       Demonstrate a basic knowledge of Prospective Payment Systems. 

7.       Identify different avenues of coding certification.

Text:

Step-By-Step Medical Coding (current year edition of both text and workbook); Carol Buck, MS, CPC, COC, CCS-P, Elsevier.                
ICD-10_CM Professional for Hospitals; (current year).  Optum360, LLC.
ICD-10 PCS � The Complete Official Code Set, (current year), Optum360, LLC.
DRG Expert- A Complete Guidebook on the DRG Classification System Using ICD-10 CM and CPT Professional Edition, (current year), American Medical Association Press.
HCPCS Level II Professional, (current year), 14th edition, Ingenix.         
Dorland�s Dictionary of Medical Acronyms & Abbreviations, 7th edition; Stanley Jablonski, 2016, Elsevier. 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: 

**A MANDATORY MOCK Coding Proficiency Exam is given on the Friday of Week 9 each quarter.  ALL MEDICAL CODING AND HEALTHCARE REIMBURSEMENT STUDENTS (Day, Night, and Online) THAT HAVE REACHED MEDICAL CODING II #289 OR ABOVE IN THEIR PROGRAMS ARE REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE EACH QUARTER AS A REQUIREMENT OF THE ACADEMIC CURRICULUM. Attendance is required either on campus from 8:00am until completion of the 5- hour examination, which may take until 2:00pm, or via the online exam format.  Participation in this examination will count as a 150-point portion of the homework grade for this course.  There will be NO make-up opportunities for the MOCK Coding Proficiency Exam, nor will there be any excused absences.  NO EXCEPTIONS.

Failure to participate in the exam will result in grade reduction which may cause failure of this course and the student will be subject to dismissal from their academic program at the discretion of the Program Director.

Coding is a unique subject, and you should understand that way that your assignments and tests are graded.  When a scenario is given, you will be asked to provide the designated codes (i.e. CPT, ICD, or HCPCS) or a combination of these codes with applicable modifiers.  This will clearly be stated in the exam instructions.  Each scenario given has only ONE right answer.  Final determination of the correct answer is at the sole discretion of the course instructor.  In the real world, an insurance claim is either paid or denied�there is no half credit or extra credit.  The same applies to this course.  You MUST use a current year edition of each manual.  If you choose the wrong code simply because you are using outdated manuals, it will be marked wrong.  You must have the current year editions of each manual in order to take the final exam required for this course.

** The research project assigned in this course is MANDATORY.  All students must complete this project per the stated guidelines.  Failure to complete this course requirement will result in automatic failure of this course regardless of a student�s overall grade status for other items in this course.  This course requirement is not subject to the college�s appeals process.  NO EXCEPTIONS.

MED291 Advanced CPT Coding

SPENCERIAN COLLEGE

SYLLABUS

Course #291

 

 

Course Title:  Advanced CPT Coding                                                 Credits:           3

Prerequisites:  209 and 289

Co-requisite:   290

 

 

 

 

 

I.   Class Time:        11-week web-assisted online course

 

 

 

II.  Course Description:

            This course will further expand the advanced coder�s knowledge of coding (inpatient and outpatient) and provide more challenging coding scenarios and case studies. The student will gain knowledge of how to troubleshoot coding problems in the medical setting as well as more advanced issues of coding for maximum reimbursement and compliance.

           

 

III.  Course Objectives:

              Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

1.     Demonstrate advanced proper use of CPT coding manual.

2.     Assign proper CPT codes to advanced medical procedures.

3.     Demonstrate an understanding of the common problems with regard to specialty coding methodologies.

4.     Demonstrate an ability to code advanced procedures from full operative reports and other sources of documentation.

5.     Demonstrate accurate coding, while completing coding procedures in an decreased time frame, equipping the student to succeed at the national coding exam.

 

 

IV.  Textbook(s):

            2017 Step-By Step Medical Coding (text and workbook), Carol J. Buck MS,CPC,CPC-H,CCS-P, Elsevier, 2017

         ICD-10-CM Professional for Physicians, (current year) Optum360, LLC, 2016

           CPT Professional Edition, (current year),  American Medical Association Press

           HCPCS Level II Professional Edition, (current year), 14th edition Ingenix

            Dorland's Dictionary of Medical Acronyms & Abbreviations, 7th  edition,

           Stanley Jablonski, 2016, Elsevier

V.  Teaching Strategy:

This course will be presented in weekly instructor-guided lessons, lecture notes, illustrations, an interactive class discussion board, assignments, and exams.

 
*Spencerian College assumes two hours of outside preparation for every one hour in a
lecture course. Therefore, homework and course preparation is expected for all
courses offered at Spencerian College in order for students to achieve the intended
learning outcomes.
           

VI.  Course Outline:

This course will address advanced coding methods for the following medical specialties and the services that they encompass:

�         Cardiovascular

�         Orthopedic/Physical Therapy

�         Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery/Dermatology

�         OB/GYN & Male and Female Medicine

�         Internal Medicine/Family Practice

�         Radiology/Interventional Radiology

�         Neurology/ENT/Pulmonology

�         Gastroenterology

 VII.  Attendance Policy

Students in this web-assisted course must actively participate and submit work EACH week. Attendance participation is done by means of assignments, exams, projects, discussion board postings, emails with the instructor, etc. Failure to participate in 3 of the weekly lessons consecutively during the 11 week quarter will result in the student being dropped from the course. Additionally, failure to login for more than a 10 day consecutive period at any point in the quarter will also result in the student being dropped from the course.

VIII.  Evaluation:

Assignments             20%

Exams                        20%

Final Exam                  50%

Participation               10%

 

A   90-100

B   80-89

C   70-79

D   60-69

F    59 and below

 

**The final exam is the MOCK Coding Proficiency Examination modeled after the AAPC�s CPC exam.  It consists of 150 questions and the student will be allotted 5 hours to complete the exam.  Due to the nature and length of this exam, it will not be offered during the normal �final exam� scheduled time slot during week 11.  The exam will be given on campus in Louisville the Friday of Week 9, at 8:00 AM, or via an online format during week 9. The students will be subject to the examination guidelines as stated by the AAPC and to the guidelines set forth in the course contract.

 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Spencerian College recognizes and supports the standards set forth in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, which are designed to prevent discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities.  Disabilities are defined as mental and/or physical impairments which substantially limit one or more of a person�s major life activities, and which necessitate modifications to the facilities, programs, or services of the College.  Spencerian College is committed to making reasonable accommodations for qualifying students in accordance with law and to creating full accessibility to campus facilities.  Spencerian College cannot, however, make accommodations that are unduly burdensome or that fundamentally alter the nature of the College�s programs.  Qualifying students need to contact their department director or the Associate Dean of Student Affairs at the beginning of their program to ensure that the student benefits from the maximum assistance possible. Medical documentation of their disability and the requested accommodations must be presented in writing at that time.

 

Revised Spring 2017

 

MED292 Medical Billing and Health Claims Review

SPENCERIAN COLLEGE

SYLLABUS

COURSE #292

 

Course Title:  Medical Billing and Health Claims Review                                         4 credits

PREREQUISITES:  178, 291

 

I.   Class Time:

Day:    4 days per week, one 50 minute class per day, 11 weeks

                                                   OR

Night:  1 night per week, 3 hours and 20 minutes per night, 11 weeks 

II.          Course Description:

This course provides training and application in medical claims follow-up, troubleshooting, problem claims, reimbursement issues, and claims appeal. 

III.                Course Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

1.       Identify problematic billing issues in the medical facility.

2.       Demonstrate claim management follow-up skills.

3.       Analyze problem claims and apply appropriate problem-solving skills for claim resolution.

4.    Demonstrate an understanding of third-party payor resubmission guidelines and appeals processes.

5.      Identify proper billing procedures to aid the facility in maximizing reimbursement and avoid being targeted for an audit.

6.      Demonstrate proper understanding and performance of pre-authorization requests (written and oral), Local Medical Review Policies, and other claims processing issues.

7.  Correctly apply National Correct Coding Initiative to submitted claims for payment determination.

8.       Demonstrate knowledge of the physician credentialing process. 

IV.                Textbooks:

Principles of Healthcare Reimbursement, 5th edition, 2015, American Health Information Management Association.

Medical Record Auditor, 4th Edition,  Grider, Deborah. 2015,  American Medical Association.

ICD� 10-CM Hospital Edition (current year), Ingenix

CPT Professional Edition, (current year), American Medical Association Press

HCPCS Level II Professional Edition, (current year), Ingenix 

V.                  Teaching Strategy

This course is taught through lecture, class discussion, audio-visual aids, research projects, essay summaries, and interactive exercises. 

*Spencerian College assumes two hours of outside preparation for every one hour in a lecture course. Therefore, homework and course preparation is expected for all courses offered at Spencerian College in order for students to achieve the intended learning outcomes. 

VI.                Course Outline:

1.       Review of the insurance claim process and CMS-1500 and UB-92 form completion.

2.      Claim Management Techniques:  Life Cycle of an Insurance Claim, Claim Adjustment Reason Codes, Remittance Advice Reason Codes, EOB Review and Case Studies, Troubleshooting Problem Claims

3.       Certificates of Medical Necessity, Medical Necessity Denials

4.       Auditing and Risk Management

5.       Physician Credentialing

6.       Medical Billing and Collection Policies

7.       NCCI Edits, Local Medicare Review Policies (LMRP�s)

8.       Medicare Appeals

9.       Medical Billing/Reimbursement Certifications, Career Opportunities

10.   Electronic Claims Processing

11.   Medical Billing Systems

12.   Legal and Ethical Considerations 

VII.              Evaluation

Case Studies/Homework             25%

Quizzes/Tests                                 30%

Comprehensive Final Exam         40%

Attendance/Professionalism         5%

 

Grading Scale:

A = 90 or more points
B = 80 to 89 points
C = 70 to 79 points
D = 60 to 69 points
F = 59 and below

 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES 

Spencerian College recognizes and supports the standards set forth in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, which are designed to present discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities.  Disabilities are defined as mental and/or physical impairments which substantially limit one or more of a person�s major life activities, and which necessitate modifications to the facilities, programs, or services of the College.  Spencerian College is committed to making reasonable accommodations for qualifying students in accordance with law and to creating full accessibility to campus facilities.  Spencerian College cannot, however, make accommodations that are unduly burdensome or that fundamentally alter the nature of the College�s programs.  Qualifying students need to contact their department director or the Associate Dean of Student Affairs at the beginning of their program to ensure that the student benefits from the maximum assistance possible.  Medical documentation of their disability and the\ requested accommodations must be presented in writing at that time. 

College Attendance Policy:

                The College attendance policy is as follows:

�         Students in courses that follow the schedule of one class period a day, four days a week will be dropped when the 9th hour is missed.

�         Students in double period classes during the day will be dropped when more than 4 absences are incurred.

�         Evening students will be dropped at the 3rd absence.  Students who miss more than 44 minutes of the overall class are counted as absent.

�         Additional information about student attendance policies can be found in the Student Handbook.

 

 

Revised Spring 2017

MED300X EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF CODING SERVICES

SPENCERIAN COLLEGE

SYLLABUS

COURSE #MED300X

 

COURSE TITLE: EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF CODING SERVICES                               

CREDITS: 4 
PREREQUISITES: 299, 151, 291, 178

  

I. Delivery Method:  Distance Education -11 weeks

 

II. Description of Course:
This course will be a continuation of management principles with special emphasis on management issues specific to coding/healthcare reimbursement services, or other related health information areas. The student will be introduced to various topics including scope of service, structure and organization of coding services, management of coding/HIM personnel, HIM statistics, physician credentialing, contract negotiations, establishment of fee schedules, and quality control.

 

III. Course Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: 


1. Identify/demonstrate knowledge of the requirements of various coding systems to ensure adherence to established guidelines

2. Identify/demonstrate effective management skills of coding, billing, and HIM personnel (recruitment, hiring, mentoring, counseling, training)

3. Identify/demonstrate an understanding of information systems necessary to effectively coordinate the mergence of clinical and financial data in a medical facility

4. Demonstrate knowledge of scope of service in managing coding services

5. Identify/demonstrate knowledge of the structure and organization of coding services

6. Demonstrate knowledge of the physician credentialing process

7. Utilize audit results to evaluate the performance of coding/billing personnel for quality control purposes

 

IV. Textbooks:


Management for the Health Information Professional, Kelly&Greenstone, AHIMA, 2016

CPT Professional Edition, (current year), American Medical Association

ICD-10-CM Professional, (current year), Ingenix

HCPCS Level II Professional, (current year), Ingenix

DRG Expert, (current year), Ingenix

ICD-10-PCS Professional, (current year), Ingenix

 

V. Teaching Strategy:

Weekly instructor-guided lessons, lecture notes, interactive class discussion board, practical application exercises, research, assignments, and exams.

 

Spencerian College assumes two hours of outside preparation for every one hour in a lecture course. Therefore, homework and course preparation is expected for all courses offered at Spencerian College in order for students to achieve the intended learning outcomes.

VI. Outline of Course:

WEEK 1  : Management Functions of Health Information Management

WEEK 2   Leadership Concepts in Health Information Management


WEEK 3  : Change Management in Health Information Management

WEEK 4   Job Descriptions and Roles in Health Information Management

WEEK 5   Recruitment, Selection, and Retention in Health Information Management

WEEK 6   Performance Management in Health Information Management

WEEK 7   Training and Development in Health Information Management

WEEK 8  Organizational Structure of Health Information Management


WEEK 9  Case Study #2: The Remote Health Information Management Department 

                MOCK Coding Proficiency Exam (see note below***)

WEEK 10 Discussion Questions and Study for Final Exam

WEEK 11 Comprehensive Final Exam 


***NOTE: All #300X students are required to participate in the MOCK Coding Proficiency Exam either online in Week 9 or on campus in Louisville the Friday of Week 9 at 8:00am. This exam is a programmatic requirement each quarter for students in the Medical Coding and Healthcare Reimbursement programs. This exam counts as a 150 points assignment for this course. Failure to participate will result in grade reduction for this course as well as disciplinary action up to an including dismissal from your program.

 
VII. Evaluation:

Final Exam 50%

Case Studies 20%

Assignments 20%

Discussion Boards 10% 

Grading Scale:

90-100 A

80-89 B

70-79 C

60-69 D

below 60 F

 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES


Spencerian College recognizes and supports the standards set forth in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, which are designed to prevent discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. Disabilities are defined as mental and/or physical impairments which substantially limit one or more of a person�s major life activities, and which necessitate modifications to the facilities, programs, or services of the College. Spencerian College is committed to making reasonable accommodations for qualifying students in accordance with law and to creating full accessibility to campus facilities. Spencerian College cannot, however, make accommodations that are unduly burdensome or that fundamentally alter the nature of the College�s programs. Qualifying students need to contact their department director or the Associate Dean of Student Affairs at the beginning of their program to ensure that the student benefits from the maximum assistance possible. Medical documentation of their disability and the requested accommodations must be presented in writing at that time.

 

Revised Winter 2018

MSS104: Medical Terminology

Sullivan University

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MSS104:  Medical Terminology

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: This course introduces the skills necessary for understanding and properly using medical terminology by presenting a foundation of roots, prefixes, and suffixes.  Word building and definitions are related to the body systems, anatomy and physiology, examinations, procedures, treatment, and abbreviations used in oral communications, written correspondence, and medical records.

Course Prerequisite:  None

 

Class Time:         Residential: 4 days per week, 11 weeks, 50 minutes per day or

                       1 evening per week, 11 weeks, 3 hours and 20 minutes per evening

Distance Education: 11 weeks

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will:

 

1.      Demonstrate appropriate use and spelling of the medical language using the fundamentals of word analysis by word roots, combining forms, prefixes, and suffixes.

2.      Differentiate types of medical terms and the relationships among illness, procedures, treatments, diagnostic terms, and abbreviations.

3.      Demonstrate proficiency in the use of physiological and anatomical terms related to medical documents.

4.      Differentiate medical terms and their synonyms use in word phrases and symbols used to describe the various stets of health and disease of the human body.

5.      Interpret medical communications used to document health care found in periodicals, medical reference materials, and patient records.

 

Text

Building a medical vocabulary: With Spanish translations (9th ed.), 2015. Leonard, P. Elsevier.

Stedman�s Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing, 7th Edition, Stedman, 2011; Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

Assessment of Outcomes:

�        350 Term Examination

�        Project

�        Final

�        Homework

See course outline for further details.

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

                                                                                     

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: *** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

A minimum of 70% (�C�) is required to pass the course for the overall grade.

COMPETENCY EVALUATIONS COMPLETED IN THIS COURSE

The following evaluations are graded.  Students must attain a score of 90 or above on each competency skill to successfully complete the course.  Participation in plus Friday tutoring is strongly advised for any student having difficulty in meeting these competencies.

The student must successfully complete all of the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competencies may be completed as an independent check off, as a component of another competency check off, or evaluation by means of course exams.

MSS104 Medical Terminology

MAERB 2015 Standards

 

Cognitive

 

V.C.9 Identify medical terms labeling the word parts

V.C.10 Define medical terms and abbreviations related to all body systems

MSS133 Anatomy and Physiology II

Sullivan University

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MSS133 Anatomy and Physiology II

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: This is a continuation of Course MSS123 with emphasis on the circulatory system, body defenses and immunity, urinary, respiratory, digestive, and reproductive systems.  Further discussion of disease processes will be included.

 

Course Prerequisite:  MSS123

 

Class Time:         Residential: 4 days per week, 11 weeks, 50 minutes per day or

                       1 evening per week, 11 weeks, 3 hours and 20 minutes per evening

Distance Education: 11 weeks

 

Required Text(s) and Resources:

The Human Body in Health and Disease- 13th Edition, Barbara Janson Cohen; Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins 2015.

Study Guide for The Human Body in Health and Disease- 13th Edition.  Kerry L. Hull & Barbara Janson Cohen; Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins 2015.

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. List major organs for each listed body system

2. Describe the normal function of each listed body system

3. Identify common pathology related to each listed body system

4. Analyze pathology as it relates to the interaction of listed body systems

5. Discuss implications for disease and disability when homeostasis not maintained 

6. Describe implications for treatment related to pathology of the listed body systems

7. Describe the relationship between anatomy and physiology of the listed body systems and medications used for treatment in each

8. Compare body structure and function of the human body across the life span

 

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

                                                                                     

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: *** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

A minimum of 70% (�C�) is required to pass the course for the overall grade.

MSS133 � Anatomy and Physiology II

MAERB 2015 Standards

 

Cognitive

I.C.1 Describe structural organization of the human body

I.C.2 Identify body systems

I.C.4 List major organs in each body system

I.C.5 Identify the anatomical location of major organs in each body system

I.C.6 Compare body structure and function of the human body across the life span

I.C.7 Describe the normal function of each body system

I.C.8 Identify common pathology related to each body system including:

a.      Signs

b.      Symptoms

c.      Etiology

I.C.9 Analyze pathology for each body system including:

       a. diagnostic measures

       b. treatment modalities

IV.C.1 Describe dietary nutrients including:

a.      Carbohydrates

b.      Fat

c.      Protein

d.      Minerals

e.      Electrolytes

f.       Vitamins

g.      Fiber

h.      Water

IV.C.2 Define the function of dietary supplements

IV.C.3 Identify the special dietary needs for:

a.      Weight control

b.      Diabetes

c.      Cardiovascular disease

d.      Hypertension

e.      Cancer

f.       Lactose sensitivity

g.      Gluten-free

h.      Food allergies

IV.C.11 Define both medical terms and abbreviations related to all body systems

MSS144: Medical Laboratory Procedures I

Sullivan University

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MSS144:  Medical Laboratory Procedures I

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: This is a lecture and laboratory class designed to introduce the student to the clinical aspects of their profession.  Some areas covered include electrocardiograms, pulmonary function testing, asepsis, sterile technique, use of the autoclave, preparing and assisting with physical examinations and performing minor procedures.  Students will address nutrition and special dietary needs of patients in this course.

 

Course Prerequisite:  MSS133

 

Class Time:         Residential:  4 days per week, 11 weeks, 50 minutes per day or

                       1 evening per week, 11 weeks, 4 hours and 20 minutes per evening

Distance Education: 11 weeks

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.      Identify concepts of medical asepsis and infection control

2.      Prepare and assist with physical examinations

3.      Explain patient care and give patient instructions

4.      Summarize adaptations for individual needs

5.      Identify and perform basic concepts of EKG and pulmonary function testing

6.      Prepare and assist with minor office surgeries demonstrating sterile technique

7.      Instruct patient according to special dietary needs and concerns

 

Text:

                Clinical Procedure for Medical Assistants, 10th ed., Bonewit-West.  Saunders, 2015

                Student Mastery Manual to Accompany Clinical Procedures for Medical Assistants, 9th ed.,Bonewit-West,

                        Saunders, 2018.

 

Assessment of Outcomes

�        Tests

�        Competencies

�        Final Exams

See course outline for details

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

                                                                                     

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: *** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

A minimum of 70% (�C�) is required to pass the course for the overall grade.

The student must successfully complete all of the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competencies may be completed as an independent check off, as a component of another competency check off, or evaluation by means of course exams.

MSS144 Medical Laboratory Procedures I

 MAERB 2015 Standards

Cognitive

 

II.C.6 Analyze healthcare results as reported in:

a.      graphs

b.      tables

III.C.3 Define the following as practiced within the ambulatory care setting:

a.      medical asepsis

b.      surgical asepsis

III.C.4 Identify methods of controlling the growth of microorganisms

III.C.7. Identify Center for Disease Control (CDC) regulations that impact healthcare practices

V.C.6 Define coaching a patient as it relates to:

                a. health maintenance

                b. Disease prevention

                c. compliance with treatment plan

                d. community resources

                e. adaptations relevant to individual patient needs

V.C.12 Define patient navigator

V.C.13 Describe the role of the medical assistant as the patient navigator

V.C.16 Differentiate between subjective and objective information

X.C.12 Describe compliance with public health statutes:

a.      communicable diseases

b.      abuse, neglect, and exploitation

c.      wounds of violence

 

Psychomotor

 

I.P.1 Measure and record:

g.    length (infant)

h.    head circumference (infant)

I.          pulse oximetry

I.P.2 Perform:

a.      electrocardiogram

b.      pulmonary function testing

I.P.3 Perform patient screening using established protocols

I.P.8 Instruct and prepare a patient for a procedure or a treatment

I.P.9 Assist provider with patient exam

II.P.4 Document on a growth chart

III.P.2 Select appropriate barrier/personal protective equipment (PPE)

III.P.3 Perform handwashing

III.P.4 Prepare items for autoclaving

III.P.5 Perform sterilization procedures

III.P.6 Prepare a sterile field

III.P.7 Perform within a sterile field

III.P.10 Demonstrate proper disposal of biohazardous material:

1.       

  1. sharps
  2. regulated waste

IV.P.1 Instruct a patient according to patient�s special dietary needs

V.P.1 Use feedback techniques to obtain patient information including:

a.      reflection

b.      restatement

c.      clarification

V.P.3 Use medical terminology correctly and pronounced accurately to communicate information to

 providers and patients

V.P.9 Develop a current list of community resources related to patient�s healthcare

V.P.10 Facilitate referrals to community resources in the role of a patient navigator

VI.P.7 Input patient data utilizing a practice management system

X.P.3 Document patient care accurately in the medical record

X.P.5 Perform compliance reporting based on public health statutes

XII.P.1 Comply with:

a.      safety signs

b.      symbols

c.      labels

 

Affective

 

I.A.1 Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient assessment

I.A.2 Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient care

I.A.3 Show awareness of a patient's concern related to the procedure being performed

IV.A.1 Show awareness of patient�s concerns regarding a dietary change

V.A.3 Demonstrate respect for individual diversity including:

a.      Gender

b.      Race

c.      Religion

d.      Age

e.      Economic status

f.       Appearance

X.A.1 Demonstrate sensitivity to patient�s rights

X.A.2 Protect the integrity of the medical record

MSS154: Health and Safety Techniques

Sullivan University

College of Allied Health

Course Syllabus

Course #MSS154:  Health and Safety Techniques

Credit Hours: 4

 

Course Description: Students become certified CPR basic rescuers (American Heart Association Healthcare Provider with AED).  Medical asepsis and infection control are discussed.  Training in vital signs and first aid procedures complete this course.

Course Prerequisite:  None

 

Class Time: Residential:  4 days per week, 11 weeks, 50 minutes per day or

                  ������������ 1 evening per week, 11 weeks, 4 hours and 20 minutes per evening

Distance Education: 11 weeks

 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.      Perform Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation according to guidelines of the American Heart Association.

2.      Perform First Aid procedures

3.      Demonstrate adherence with OSHA bloodborne pathogens standards, Fire Prevention, and Ergonomics training mandates

4.      Perform Vital Signs

Text

BLS for Healthcare Providers; AHA, 2016.

Health & Safety Techniques; Sullivan University, Elsevier, 2018.

 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline.

 

Grading System:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

-----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

-----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

-----

Failing � not actively engaged

                                                                                     

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion. 

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.  For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

 

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.  

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Accommodations for the Disabled in the current catalog. 

 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: *** Students must successfully complete all required individual competencies prior to completing this course.  In some courses, additional programmatic competency evaluation is required.   Per AAMA/MAERB/CAAHEP programmatic requirements, students in the Medical Assisting program, or programs that include Medical Assisting (i.e. MCSA, MAMA), are required to demonstrate competency by achieving a minimum of 70% on the designated course competency exam.  In these MA inclusive programs, students who score less than 70% on the competency exam will not pass the class regardless of their grade status on other items in the course.

A minimum of 70% (�C�) is required to pass the course for the overall grade.

COMPETENCY EVALUATIONS COMPLETED IN THIS COURSE

The following evaluations are graded.  Students must attain a score of 90 or above on each competency skill to successfully complete the course.  Participation in plus Friday tutoring is strongly advised for any student having difficulty in meeting these competencies.

The student must successfully complete all of the following competencies prior to completing this course.  Competencies may be completed as an independent check off, as a component of another competency check off, or evaluation by means of course exams.

MSS154 Health and Safety

MAERB 2015 Standards

 

Cognitive

 

I.C.13 List principles and steps of professional/provider CPR

I.C.14 Describe basic principles of first aid as they pertain to the ambulatory healthcare setting

III.C.1 List major types of infectious agents

III.C.2. Describe the infection cycle including:

a.      The infectious agent

b.      Reservoir

c.      Susceptible host

d.      Means of transmission

e.      Portals of entry

f.       Portals of exit

III.C.5 Define the principles of standard precautions

III.C.6 Define personal protective equipment (PPE) for:

a.      All body fluids, secretions and excretions

b.      Blood

c.      Non-intact skin

d.      Mucous membranes

X.C.12 Describe compliance with public health statutes:

a.      communicable diseases

b.      abuse, neglect, and exploitation

c.      wounds of violence

XII.C.1 Identify:

1.       

  1. safety signs
  2. symbols
  3. labels

XII.C.2 Identify safety techniques that can be used in responding to accidental exposure to:

a.      Blood

b.      Other body fluids

c.      Needle sticks

d.      Chemicals

XII.C.3 Discuss fire safety issues in the ambulatory healthcare environment

XII.C.4 Describe fundamental principles for evacuation of a healthcare setting

XII.C.5 Describe the purpose of Safety Data Sheets (SDS) in a healthcare setting

XII.C.6 Discuss protocols for disposal of biological chemical materials

XII.C.7 Identify principles of:

a.      Body mechanics

b.      Ergonomics

XII.C.8 Identify critical elements of an emergency plan for response to a natural disaster or other emergency

 

Psychomotor

 

I.P.1 Measure and record:

                a. blood pressure

                b. temperature

                c. pulse

                d. respirations

                e. height

                f. weight

I.P.12 Produce up-to-date documentation of provider/professional level CPR

I.P.13. Perform first aid procedures for:

                a. bleeding

                b. diabetic coma or insulin shock

                c. fractures

                d. seizures

                e. shock

                f. syncope

III.P.1 Participate in blood borne pathogen training

III.P.2 Select appropriate barrier/personal protective equipment

III.P.8 Perform wound care

III.P.9 Perform dressing change

XII.P.1 Comply with:

                a. safety signs

                b. symbols

                c. labels

XII.P.2 Demonstrate proper use of:

b. Fire extinguisher

XII.P.3 Use proper body mechanics

XII.P.4 Participate in a mock exposure event with documentation of specific steps

XII.P.5 Evaluate the work environment to identify unsafe working conditions

 

Affective

 

III.A.1 Recognize the implications for failure to comply with Center for Disease Control (CDC) regulations in healthcare settings

V.A.1 Demonstrate:

                a. empathy

                b. active listening

                c. nonverbal communication

V.A.2 Demonstrate the principles of self-boundary

XII.A.1 Recognize the physical and emotional effects on a person involved in an emergency situation

XII.A.2 Demonstrate self-awareness in responding to an emergency situation

MSS214X - Medical Software Applications

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Course Syllabus
MSS214X - Medical Software Applications
4 Credit Hours

Course Description

This course introduces the student to medical informatics by providing a step-by-step approach of using medical office management software through a simulated Electronic Health Record (EHR).

Course Prerequisites

CSC118, MSS104

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�        Utilize electronic health records management

�        Utilize hands on application of medical records software system components in order to apply these applications to the real medical office setting

�        File and maintain patient medical information using EHR

�        Utilize EHR software/hardware successfully

�        Demonstrate appropriate security measures for protection of medical information using the electronic health record

Assessment of Outcomes  

Specified on the course schedule/outline

Grading System

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

 

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation

Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity

Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities

Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information

None

RCT507X - Image Production in Computed Tomography

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Allied Health
Course Syllabus
RCT507X - Image Production in Computed Tomography
Credit Hours: 5

Course Description

Through readings and assignments, this course deals with the physics and the technologic aspects of conventional and spiral/helical CT, including digital image processing radiation attenuation, data acquisition, and image reconstruction. In addition, this course will describe the major components of a CT scanner and discuss the factors affecting image quality and radiation dose to the patient. 

Course Prerequisite

Acceptance into the CT program

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

 

Assessment of Outcomes  

Specified on the course schedule/outline

Grading System

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged


For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation

Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity

Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities

Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information

None

College of Business

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business
Course Syllabus
BUS204X - Introduction to Business Law and Ethics
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description

This course is a survey of the nature and functions of law with emphasis on its application in the field of contracts, including a scan of the legal framework of agency, torts, partnership and corporate relationships.

Course Prerequisite

None

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�        Assess and manage everyday legal risks and ethical challenges in the business environment

�        Explain the distinction between ethical and legal judgment

�        Identify how to integrate judgment into everyday business decisions

�        Use appropriate legal and ethical terminology

�        Describe how the law balances rights

�        Explain the principal sources of law

�        Describe generally the court system and alternative dispute resolution

�        Apply the elements of a contract including offer and acceptance, mutual assent, capacity, consideration, legality, form (writing), and methods of discharge

�        Explain consumer protection law to a degree sufficient to be useful in business and consumer transactions

�        Compare the principal/agent and employer/employee relationship

�        Identify ethical issues when they arise in business situations

�        Describe the relevance of law and the relationship between law and business

�        Explain how the law is subject to multiple, often conflicting forces and constantly changing

�        Identify how to avoid dangerous or expensive mistakes

�        Identify when to seek the assistance of an attorney

Assessment of Outcomes

Specified on the course schedule/outline

Grading System

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation

Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity

Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities

Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information

None

 

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration (COBA)
Course Syllabus
BUS224:  Professional Development
Credit Hours: 4 quarter hours 

Course Description:

This course is designed to assist students in obtaining employment and how to become an effective employee. The student gains skills in interviewing techniques, resume writing, networking and communication. Emphasis is placed on values, goals and business ethics. This course is designed to enable the student to develop essential skills and knowledge necessary to reach their full career potential. It is the instructor�s intention that this class be as practical and applicable to real life as is possible. The student will gain skills to evaluate his/her capabilities relevant to their profession, prepare a summary of those skills, write a resume, develop a job search plan, interview effectively, adjust to a new job and resign professionally. The student will also obtain skills in effective communication with employers and coworkers.

Course Prerequisite: None

Course Outcomes:

�         Complete a self-evaluation to identify and summarize personal and professional qualities

�         Develop an effective cover letter, resume and portfolio

�         Develop an effective job search strategy and networking skill set

�         Develop successful interviewing techniques and participate effectively in practice interviews

�         Understand negotiating techniques

�         Understand techniques for succeeding in a new job and methods for making a job change  

Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on Course Outline

Grading System:

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

 


Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.  

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation:  Students must be actively engaged in the course.   For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.


Academic Integrity:  Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity Policy and are consequently strictly prohibited.  All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog.  They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the university.  For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.   

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog. 

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information:  None

I. TEXT:

Brown, Gordon W., and Paul A. Sukys: Business Law, with UCC Applications, 13th ed., McGraw-Hill / Irwin
ISBN: 9780073524955
 

II. COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is a study of the law of sales; consumer protection; personal property and bailments; real estate; wills, intestacy, and trusts; negotiable instruments and banking; insurance; secured transactions; employment law; partnerships and corporations; and international law.
 

III. COURSE OBJECTIVES:

�        Contrast the laws of sales under the UCC with the common law.

�        Describe the laws of consumer protection.

�        Explain the disposition of a deceased person�s property.

�        Understand the concept of negotiability and know the various types of negotiable instruments.

�        Know the various security devices for real estate and for personal property.

�        Distinguish among the various kinds of business organizations and discuss the various federal and state laws that regulate them.

�        Know how international statutes and treaties protect innovation.

�        Understand the ever-growing influence of international law in the world of business.

IV. COURSE OUTCOMES:

�        An ability to use precise legal language.  

�        An understanding of business law and legal procedures.

�        An understanding of various legal remedies.

�        An understanding of employee rights and management responsibilities.

�        An ability to apply legal principals to business transactions.

�        Recognition of situations that call for legal advice. 
 

�        An understanding of corporate structure and governance.

�        Knowledge of various international legal concepts and institutions.

V. EVALUATION:
 

 Midterm

 100

33.33%

 Comprehensive Final

 100

33.33%

 Weekly Chapter Questions

 50 (5 pts. ea. for 10 weekly assignments) 

16.67%

 Discussion Board Questions

 50 (5 pts. ea. for 10 weekly assignments)

16.67%

 Total

 300

100%

 

VI. GRADING SCALE:

 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

 

VII. CLASS POLICIES:

This syllabus is subject to change at the discretion of the instructor.

IMPORTANT NOTE FROM YOUR INSTRUCTOR! Please keep the original emails for all correspondence in your �Sent� folder or copy the email to your personal email account. If I don't receive your email and a penalty is assessed, I will require the original email in order to give you the appropriate credit.

Any student that reports that they are having technical difficulties and therefore, cannot meet a deadline must provide proof of contact with the Learning Management System (LMS) helpdesk in the form of a Ticket number.

It is YOUR responsibility to ensure the course work you submit is correctly posted or uploaded. You will ALWAYS receive a confirmation screen from the LMS that your submission was successful. Consider printing out this confirmation screen and saving it for your records.

Assignments are due by due dates that are set out in the Course Instructions & Directions. Remember, late assignments will not be accepted.

 

 

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration
Course Syllabus
BUS424X - International Business
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description: This class covers such topics as foreign environment for overseas operations; U.S. Government policies and programs for international business; international economic policies; and management decisions and their implementation in international marketing, management, and finance.

Course Prerequisite: MGT304

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�         Define international trade theory

�         Discuss the political and legal actors that impact international business

�         Discuss the impact of culture on international business

�         Discuss the role of emerging markets on international business

�         Describe the impact of trade agreements on international business

�         Describe the role of the international monetary system on international business

�         Discuss the effect of exchange rates on international business

�         Discuss the various entry modes to exporting

�         Describe the role of global sourcing on international business

�         Describe the importance of global strategic planning on international business

�         Define the role of human relations in an international business environment

�         Describe the role of research and development in international business

�         Describe the challenges and opportunities on international marketing

�         Describe the importance of supply chain management to an international business

�         Define the role of accounting in an international business


Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on Course Outline.

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged


Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: Students may want to update their Career Development Plans during this course.

CMM401 Principles of Conflict Management

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration (COBA)
Course Syllabus
CMM401: Principles of Conflict Management
Credit Hours: 4 quarter hours

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to present communication theories relevant to conflict resolution and to help managers understand, analyze, and manage conflict. In addition to increasing communication skills, the course will focus on the human and emotional aspects of conflict including the influence of anger, gender, culture, forgiveness, and linguistics.

Course Prerequisite:  None

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: 

1.       Discuss basic theories of conflict

2.       Recognize and apply productive ways to manage conflicts

3.       Evaluate the conflict management style of the student

4.       Apply models for conflict analysis and conflict management and best practices

5.       Explain the role of anger, gender, culture, power and forgiveness in conflict

6.       Develop and apply good communication and listening skills. 

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline 

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged


Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

CMM402/HRL303 - Diversity Perspectives in the Workplace

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration (COBA)
Course Syllabus
CMM402/HRL303 - Diversity Perspectives in the Workplace
Credit Hours: 4 quarter hours

 

Course Desciption: By applying the principles and techniques learned, students should be able to better understand and work with an increasingly diverse workforce. Students will learn to appreciate diversity among individuals, understand advantages of a well-managed workforce, recognize and manage stereotyping, reduce EEO occurrences, and develop creative solutions for managing diversity issues. (Same as HRL 303).

Course Prerequisite: None

Student Learning Outcomes:  Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

1.       Define ethnic groups, gender groups, age groups, and the physically challenged

2.       Identify the myths and facts related to each group

3.       Discuss and separate reality from preconceptions

4.       Explain the value of a diverse workplace

5.       Apply theories of diversity to the workplace.  

Assessment of Outcomes:  Specified on course outline

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program)-Specific Information: None.

Effective: March 2016          Version: 4.0

CMM405 - Restorative Justice Philosophy and Proces

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration (COBA)
Course Syllabus
CMM405 - Restorative Justice Philosophy and Process
Credit Hours: 4 quarter hours

Course Description: This course offers a critical review of Restorative Justice (RJ) including a consideration of its definitions, historical roots, theoretical origins, key principles and substantive practices. Students will examine restorative justice from a historical, sociological, criminological and psychological perspective. Assumptions about justice will be examined by comparing and contrasting retributive and restorative paradigms. The course also provides a critical assessment of the benefits and limitations of restorative justice.

Course Prerequisite: None

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

1.       Discuss restorative justice concepts, principles and values

2.       Explain the concept, methods and potential uses of different restorative justice practices

3.       Identify the personal, interpersonal, and organizational changes necessary for implementation of restorative justice initiatives and the implications for policy and program development including stakeholder and professional roles

4.       Identify the historical and theological roots of restorative justice

5.       Compare and contrast restorative and retributive justice models

6.       Evaluate the philosophy of restorative justice, while gaining an understanding of the nature of justice from the perspective of the victim, perpetrator, and community.

Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on course outline

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

HCA401X Principles of Healthcare Finance

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration
Course Syllabus
HCA401X - Principles of Healthcare Finance
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description

This class is intended to give students an introduction to the managed care landscape and the third-party payment system of today�s healthcare industry. Topics will include managed care, Medicare and Medicaid issues, reimbursement mechanisms, universal healthcare, capitation, per-case or per-diagnosis payment, how these are packaged by third-party payers, and the effects reimbursement types have on health care provider organizations.

Course Prerequisite

MGT 304

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�         Describe the financial management functions of healthcare

�         Analyze the difference between financial management and accounting functions within healthcare organizations

�         Analyze the functions of a CFO within a healthcare organization

�         Describe the 5 financial principles used in the effective and efficient management of a successful healthcare organization

�         Describe the �language of business� of financial accounting used in healthcare organizations

�         Demonstrate managerial decision making related to employee selection, training, and evaluation techniques related to supervision

�         Contrast financial statements related to for-profit entity vs. not-for profit organizations

�         Describe the following healthcare financing terms: DRG, Deferred Tax Liability, Accrual principle, Variance analysis

�         Specify the financial facts of a healthcare organization

�         Describe valuing assets of a healthcare organization

�         Describe budgeting processes within a healthcare organization including variance analysis

�         Describe the basics of capital budgeting within a healthcare organization

�         Describe the management of endowment in a not-for-profit organization

�         Apply financial best practices used within a healthcare organization

Assessment of Outcomes  

Specified on the course schedule/outline

Grading System

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged


For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation

Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity

Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities

Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information

None

HCA402X Senior Seminar in Healthcare Topics

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration, Healthcare Department 
Course Syllabus
HCA402X - Senior Seminar in Healthcare Topics
Credit Hours: 4


 

Course Description: This course is designed to allow the student to explore current trends in healthcare and examine how these trends affect the future of healthcare in the United States and in other nations of the world. These topics may include government legislation, genetics, computers in healthcare, human resource needs, and developments in managed care.

Course Prerequisite: Senior status, HCA301, HCA302, HCA401

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�         Describe current healthcare issues facing the U.S.

�         Discuss how society as a whole is dealing with the advent of the ACA and its impact on healthcare

�         Identify how the continuous government intervention is affecting healthcare providers

�         Describe the effects of ethnic and racial disparity on healthcare today

�         Describe how healthcare expenditure and pharmaceutical control are affecting the quality of healthcare delivery

�         Describe how special populations such as HIV and AIDS, children�s health, homeless people and mental health are affecting rising costs and delivery of care

�         Identify the ethical issues in public health and health services

�         Evaluate whether government intervention is good or bad to the industry as a whole

�         Describe the impact of on-going advances in technology and healthcare

�         Identify and describe future direction healthcare needs to make if any on whether to correct the system or improve innovations

Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on Course Outline.

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged


Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

HRL310X HR Perspectives in Guidance and Counseling

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration
Course Syllabus
HRL310X - HR Perspectives in Guidance and Counseling
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description

This course is a comprehensive review of the various theories, concepts and approaches of counseling needed in the human resource setting. It enhances the ability of the human resource manager to relate to personal issues relevant to work and familial issues that stifle effectiveness and productivity. It allows the manager to recognize areas where he/she can assist and where referral is more appropriate. It additionally strengthens the competencies of the manager in the area of career counseling.

 

Course Prerequisite

None

 

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�         Discuss pros and cons of HR counseling, as well as counseling as a profession

�         Compare and contrast counseling, coaching, and mentoring use within an the HR setting

�         Examine business and HR principles as they relate to counseling and/or coaching and the need for these skills in the modern workplace

�         Examine ethical issues that arise in counseling especially as they pertain to HR

�         Discuss key terms as well as integrate theories into practice concerning HR counseling and coaching

Assessment of Outcomes 
 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged


For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

Active Participation

Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity

Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities

Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information

None

HRL431X - Corporate Training

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
The College of Business Administration-Human Resource Leadership
Course Syllabus
HRL431X - Corporate Training


 

Course Description: This course is a study of the techniques, systems, approaches and issues related to the development, administration, and management of the corporate/organizational training program. Emphasis is placed on determining training needs, the training analysis system, testing, and the development of effective training programs for all employees.

Course Prerequisite: None

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�         Discuss the role of training in corporations

�         Analyze performance problems to determine the proper intervention (training or other)

�         Identify training goals and needs

�         Analyze learner characteristics and instructional contexts

�         Formulate training objectives/outcomes

�         Utilize a variety of instructional strategies

�         Evaluate a training program

�         Develop a training plan and training materials

Assessment of Outcomes: 

�         Discussions

�         Written assignments

�         Final exam

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

HRL465X - Health and Safety in the Workplace

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business
Course Syllabus
HRL465X - Health and Safety in the Workplace
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description

This course presents an examination of the principles of health and safety as they apply to the modern workplace. Specific topics discussed include OSHA legislation and standards, worker�s compensation, stress related problems, workplace violence, and terrorism threats in the workplace. Prerequisite(s): None

 

Course Prerequisite

None

 

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�         Discuss hazardous materials management, construction safety, OSH safety training and accident investigation and present a coherent analysis to supported legislation.

�         Describe the management fundamentals to promote health and safe practices for the workplace.

�         Discuss the proper administrative or engineering controls that should be used to reduce exposure and minimize injuries and propose methods to eliminate the hazards. 

�         Identify unsafe hazard conditions in the workplace or home that pose danger, threat and safety or health, and report unsafe conditions and work practices.

�         Evaluate and control hazards on the jobsite, and identify decisions required to maintain protection of the environment, workplace, and home as well as personal health and safety.

�         Identify and describe the organization of regulatory agencies that deal with issues of occupational safety and health, environmental health, and risk management.

�         Define basic terminology used in the field of occupational safety and health and apply it appropriately.

�         Describe and demonstrate how to access safety information and resources.

�         Discuss the history and evolution of occupational safety and health.

�         Evaluate the financial and human impact of occupational injuries and illnesses.

�         Identify elements of workers compensation plans.

 

Assessment of Outcomes  

Specified on the course schedule/outline

Grading System

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

For more details about the Grading System, please see the current catalog.

 

Active Participation

Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

 

Academic Integrity

Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

 

Students with Disabilities

Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

 

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information

None

HRL471X - Project in Human Resource Management

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
The College of Business Administration
Human Resource Leadership
Course Syllabus
HRL471X - Project in Human Resource Management


 

Course Description: This course is a culmination of all previous course work and designed to allow the student to utilize his/her total human resource knowledge.  Based upon the instructor�s guidance, the student develops a project related to the overall human resource environment. Major topics include legal issues, training, performance appraisals, industrial relations, diversity, compensation, safety, job analysis, equal opportunity, staffing and recruitment, as well as the development and utilization of general employment practices.

Course Prerequisite: None 

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�         Discuss the comprehensive functions and responsibilities of the human resources field, to include recruiting, training, compensation, human resource information systems, diversity etc., and how these support the overall organization

�         Articulate fundamental human resource theories, concepts, and human resource practices

�         Explain human resource support functions, such as psychological and social perspectives, legal issues, union perspectives, and ethics

�         Identify and use human resource management web sites, academic journals and practitioner journals

Assessment of Outcomes:

�         Discussion Questions

�         Case Studies

�         Interview and Presentation

�         Midterm Exam

�         Capstone Project

�         Competency Exam

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

LDR401X - Essentials of Leadership

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
School of Business
Course Syllabus
LDR401X - Essentials of Leadership
Credit Hours: 4


 

Course Description: This course requires the student to investigate, analyze, and research the historical and contemporary concepts of leadership. The student will be informed of the traits, characteristics, qualities, motives, and personalities of the leader that will be needed to harness the uniqueness of today's workforce.

The leadership styles of task-relationship, principle-centered leadership, situational leadership, and hybrid leadership will be discussed. The students will also be introduced to the responsibility of helping others in the organization to reach their leadership potential.

Course Prerequisite: None

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�         Examine the historical and contemporary concepts of leadership and the leader

�         Understand the skills needed for him/her to be an effective leader

�         Recognize the importance of developing leadership skills in others

�         Develop leadership skills to be applied in real-life situations

�         Develop personal leadership plans demonstrating the application of leadership theory

Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on Course Outline.

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

MGT114X - Business Organization and Management

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration
Course Syllabus
MGT114X - Business Organization and Management
Credit Hours: 4


 

Course Description: This course is a practical treatment of many fields of business activities which include retailing, wholesaling, manufacturing, and service. Management functions, accounting, marketing, and finance are carefully developed. This course includes practical application of stock and bond investments.

Course Prerequisite: None

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�        Describe the dynamics of the competitive marketplace

�        Describe the role of economics as a framework for business

�        Describe capitalism and the free market system

�        Discuss the impact monetary and banking policy has on business management

�        Discuss the role of managerial and financial accounting in business management

�        Describe entrepreneurism and business formation

�        Discuss organizational strategy and structure in the context of the business environment

�        Describe the marketing function and its role in creating customer value and demand

�        Describe operations management, lean operations, and quality control

�        Discuss logistics, distribution, and supply chain management

�        Describe the role of human resources management

�        Discuss the role information and technology management play in business management

�        Discuss the importance of social responsibility and ethical behavior in modern business

�        Discuss the concepts of communication and its importance on organizational performance

�        Discuss customer service and its role in creating competitive advantage

�        Describe the relevance of each course identified in your selected degree program towards its contribution to success in your chosen career
 

Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on Course Outline.

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog. 

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information:  None

MGT274X - Basic Supervision

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business 
Course Syllabus
MGT274X - Basic Supervision
Credit Hours: 4


 

Course Description:

This course teaches the interrelationship of office functions, service, facilities, office communications, problem-solving, and successful human relations in office administration, with emphasis on first-line supervisory duties.


Course Prerequisite: MGT 114

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:           

�        Describe management tools and principals related to supervision

�        Demonstrate organizational diagramming techniques related to supervision

�        Demonstrate techniques used in planning work schedules related to supervision

�        Describe logistics and distribution processes related to supervision

�        Describe group dynamics and team building techniques related to supervision

�        Demonstrate employee selection, training, and evaluation techniques related to supervision

�        Describe individual and team motivational techniques related to supervision

�        Describe conflict management and dispute resolution techniques related to supervision

�        Describe quality assurance concepts related to supervision

�        Describe basic finance concepts related to supervision

�        Describe basic budgeting concepts related to supervision

�        Apply cost benefit analysis to supervision

�        Describe ethical behavior related to supervision

�        Develop SMART goals in support of career development planning related to supervisors

�        Demonstrate career-appropriate communication techniques used by supervisors

 Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on Course Outline.

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

 

MGT284X Human Resource Fundamentals

 SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
Management
Course Syllabus
MGT284X Human Resource Fundamentals

Course Description: This course presents an examination of the principles of personnel management as they apply to a modern industrial society. Specific topics discussed include the selection, placement, training, and promotion of personnel. A study of major legislation as it applies to various types of discrimination is included.

Course Prerequisite: None

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�         Describe the theories and practices relating to the management of human resources.

�         Explain the roles of supervisors and executives play in human resource management.

�         Describe the legal framework of HR that affects managerial decision making.

�         Discuss the environment that exists between the union and management.

Assessment of Outcomes: Discussions, Critical Thinking Papers, Assignments, Group Assignments, Exams, Comprehensive Final Exam

Grading System:

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

MGT295X Small Business Management

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
Management
Course Syllabus
MGT295X Small Business Management
 


 

Course Description: This course is a study of the challenges involved in starting and operating a successful small business such as location, determining how to borrow money, budgeting, credit, controlling inventory, turnover, and purchasing. 
 


Course Prerequisite: Advisor Approval; Last quarter of Associate degree.

Course Outcomes: 

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: 

1.       Compare and contrast advantages/disadvantages of owning one�s own business

2.       Examine financial statements including balance sheets, proforma statements, and cash flow

3.       Evaluate various business plans and projections

4.       Compare and contrast various marketing techniques utilized in small business management

5.       Examine management techniques and skills critical to being successful in small business.

Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on Course Outline

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending on the student's academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.  For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook. 

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

Discipline (Program) - Specific Information: None

 

Effective June, 2016.      Version 4.0

MGT304X - Principles of Management

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration
Course Syllabus
MGT304X - Principles of Management
Credit Hours: 4


 

Course Description: This course provides an analysis of fundamental management principles integrated with the concepts of behavioral sciences. Management processes, resources and organizational structure are introduced.

Course Prerequisite: None

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�         Describe the key aspects and result areas of management vs leadership

�         Compare, contrast, and connect the ever changing global business environment with the changes in the dynamic and diverse workplace, including the challenges of global economics

�         Examine and discuss the ethical practices and social responsibilities expected of today�s managers

�         Describe best practices to find and retain the right people, manage misbehavior, get rid of the incompetents, and to create an effective organizational structure and culture that embraces diversity

�         Describe the best steps to use to plan, strategize, communicate with clarity, and to hold effective meetings

�         Identify procedures to manage change, time, and stress, and to motivate to build team spirit and develop peak performers

�         Describe how to effectively mentor, coach, delegate and network

�         Describe how to develop and work within a team, including best practices for effective project management

�         Compare management by objective to management by exception and determine which is best in particular situations

�         Describe the key areas of business and discuss their interrelatedness in the value-chain, focusing on organizational, operational, and financial control

�         Analyze and report on best practices for brainstorming and making good decisions

�         Identify and discuss the advantages and pitfalls of information technology, regulations, and risk management

�         Analyze and report on the best steps to negotiate like a professional in the midst of conflict and corporate politics

�         Develop a plan to become a role model and achieve personal excellence in both management and leadership

�         Demonstrate written and oral communication skills within the context of management


Assessment of Outcomes: Specified on Course Outline

Grading System: 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

MGT324: Human Resource Leadership

 SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business Administration
Course Syllabus
MGT324: Human Resource Leadership

Course Description: This course presents an examination of the principles of human resources, including such topics as staffing, training, compensating, employee relations, and global human resources, with emphasis on contemporary workplace issues.

Course Prerequisite: MGT304 or HMS304

Course Outcomes: 
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

�         Describe the major roles of human resource management

�         Discuss the importance of the human resource management function

�         Recognize and explain contemporary human resource management issues

�         Relate human resource management to the organization�s strategic plan

Assessment of Outcomes: Discussion forums, exams, research project, and weekly assignments
 

Letter Grade

Range

Definition

A

90-100

Excellent

B

80-89

Above Average

C

70-79

Average

D

60-69

Below Average

F

0-59

Failing

W

----

Withdrawal during 1st 7 weeks

WF

----

Withdrawal failing after 7 weeks

NF

----

Failing--not actively engaged

 

Depending upon the student�s academic program, a grade of C or better may be required for successful completion.

For more details about the Grading System, please see the Student Handbook.

Active Participation: Students must be actively engaged in the course. For a definition of active engagement, please see the current catalog.

Academic Integrity: Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses against the University�s Academic Integrity and are consequently strictly prohibited. All students must familiarize themselves with the University policy on Academic Integrity.

Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are described in the University policy on Academic Integrity in the Catalog. They include failure of the assignment, failure for the course, or dismissal from the University. For the complete Cheating/Plagiarism policy, please see the current catalog.

Students with Disabilities: Students who have disabilities that may impact their performance in this course should follow the process described under the heading Disabled Student Services in the current catalog.

MGT330X - Information Systems for Managers

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
College of Business
Course Syllabus
MGT330X - Information Systems for Managers
Credit Hours: 4

Course Description

This course is designed to prepare managers to make IT investment decisions, take leadership roles in IT implementation projects, and better understand IT service delivery trade-offs. 

 

Course Prerequisite

MGT304 or HMS304

 

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

�        Analyze the benefits and limitations of different technologies

�        Discuss the rich variety of managerial issues raised by information systems

�        Demonstrate how information systems can help companies achieve competitive advantage

�        Summarize ethical Issues related to information systems

�        Compare and contrast the generational differences between IT professionals

�        Describe how to manage global IT talent/skills shortages while dealing with budget constraints

�        Discuss the balance between cloud computing benefits and security risks

�        Examine the ethics of behavioral tracking, behavioral targeting, and behavioral marketing

�        Analyze the security challenges of BYOD, BYOT, BYOP, BYOPC, BYOA and social hacking

�        Illustrate the rapid advances in new technology

�        Demonstrate the challenges of coexisting virtual and physical server environments

�        Analyze the risks of multiple user systems from multiple locations on multiple devices

�        Discuss how big data analytics can be used to cope with the Internet of Things

�        Compare and contrast the challenges of managing structured and unstructured big data

�        Examine how social media, social dialog, and semantic analysis tools can be used to create more sales and improve customer support

�        Determine management challenges concerning Shadow IT

�        Explain how to create value by improving services with combined outsourcing